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Full text of "Christian Cynosure"


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Annual Meeting 

Chicago 
May 21 and 22 



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CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $ 1 .00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicago, IJ1., under Act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Students Can't Run College ^ . . . . 1 

Blow to Fraternities 1 

Lid on Secret Societies /. . . 1 

Growth of Romanism 1 

Romanists Obtain Indian Funds 2 

Knights of the Royal Arch 2 

Order of the Blue Goose *2 

Initiated, Sues for $10,000. 2 

Is It a Masonic Church? 3 

Greatest Revivals Follow Faithful Testi- 
mony *3 

Lodge-Members Dominating the Church. 4 

True and Untrue (Poetry) 4 

Red White Man's Big Talk 4 

The Open Road. By David Grayson. (Il- 
lustrated) 5 

A Correction and Explanation 10 

President Blanchard's Letter 11 

China Is Agitated 15 

Contributions to Our Work 16 

News of Our Work 16 

Secretary W. B. Stoddard's Report 16 

Rev. G. A. Pegram's Letter 17 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter 18 

Our Kentucky Letter 19 

Rev. II. P. Gray's Report 20 

From Rev. F. J. Davidson 20 

From Home Guards 21 

Annual Meeting Program 22, 23, 24 

Index to Volume XL .25-30 

Mr. Bryan Is Initiated 30 

Black Hand Dooms Voltni 30 



INDIANA STATE OFFICERS, 
1907=1908. 

President — Rev. L. G. Bears, 412 W. 
13th street, Peru. 

Vice Presidents— Rev. C. A. Mum- 
mart, Huntington ; Rev. L. H. Ebey, ; 
and Rev. D. Y. Schultz, Bible Training 
School, Fort Wayne., 

Secretary — Rev. H. C. Ingersoll, 13 18 
E. Creighton avenue, Fort Wayne. 



NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY STATE 
OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. F. M. Foster, 345 W. 
29th St., New York City. 

First Vice President — Rev. D. Vander 
Ploeg, 47 Hope Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Second Vice President — Rev. K. F. 
Ohlson, 140 East 50th St., New York 
City. , 

Third Vice President — Rev. H. Blews, 
Brooklyn, N. Y v 

Secretary — Rev. G. Westenberg, 129 
4th Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

Treasurer — Rev. James Parker, 341 
Webster Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



IOWA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. J. S. McGaw, Morn- 
ing Sun, R. F. D. 

First Vice-President — Rev. H. P. 
Gray, Auburn. 

Second Vice-President — Rev. V. S. 
Jensen, Bray ton, R. F. D. 1. 

Secretary — Rev. T. J. Adrian, 723 
Penn. Ave., Des Moines. 

Treasurer — Abner Branson, New 
Sharon. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. J\.. D. Zahnizer, of 
Blairsville. 

Thirst Vice President — I. N. H. Beam, 
of Elizabethtown College. 

Second Vice President — Rev. J. S. 
Martin, of New Castle. , 

Secretary — Rev. O. G. Schoenlein, of 
Castle Shannon. 

Treasurer — H. C. Cassel, 2305 Ger- 
mantown avenue, Philadelphia. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, MAY, 1908. 



NUMBER 1 



STUDENTS CAN'T RUN COLLEGE. 

The trustees of Westminster College 
met in Pittsburg March 24, and, after a 
stormy session, upheld the action of the 
president, Rev. Dr. R. M. Russell, who 
recently suspended twelve of the most 
prominent students because they refused 
to discontinue their Greek letter socie- 
ties. 

Included among the suspended stu- 
dents are the manager of the basketball 
team, football team, baseball team and 
many of the players, and the editor of 
the college paper. 



BLOW TO FRATERNITIES 

Columbus, Ohio, April 1. — By a vote 
of 74 to 8 the house to-day passed the 
bill introduced in the general assembly to 
prohibit high school fraternities. 



LID ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

If you want to go to school in Chicago 
3'ou must sign the pledge. This is a copy 
of the pledge : 

"In consideration of being a pupil of 
a Chicago public school, on or after Sept. 

1, 1908, I, , having been a member 

of a so called secret society, known as 
or of the nature of a fraternity or soror- 
ity, do hereby renounce my membership 
in said organization and pledge myself 
not to become again a member of or have 
any connection whatever with any such 
so called secret society, having its exist- 
ence in whole or in part in any public 
school of said city, or where activities of 
such society work back and have an effect 
upon the discipline or scholarship of said 
public school, during my continuance as 
a pupil in the public schools of Chicago. 
I make this pledge without any reserva- 
tion whatsoever." 

'T hereby approve the accompanying 
resignation and certify that the state- 



ment therein made is true, to the best of 
my knowledge and belief." 

The last paragraph must be signed by 
the parent or guardian. 



GROWTH OF ROMANISM. 

The Boston Pilot, a Romanist organ, 
says that the advance sheets of the Cath- 
olic Directory show that the gain for the 
year has been 787,573. Adding the in- 
clusion through annexation of the Phil- 
ippines, Porto Rico, and the Sandwich: 
Islands, the American flag covers 22,- 
018,878 Romanists. One of the Commis- 
sioners of the National Census of Relig- 
ions is the Most Rev. John J. Glennon, 
D. D., Archbishop of St. Louis. 

The Romanists form the largest relig- 
ious sect in the United States, and more 
than one-third of all persons claiming 
church membership are adherents of 
Rome. In the West, there is a Church- 
Extension movement. "The Apostolic 
Mission House at Washington, D. C, is 
training men for the double work of 
stimulating the zeal of hereditary Catho- 
lics, and reaching out to the vast multi- 
tude of the unchurched in the United' 
States." Five negro priests are helping 
the work of Romanizing their race ; col- 
ored students are preparing ; the Pope is 
strongly encouraging the work among 
the Negroes ; Cardinal Gibbons is chair- 
man of the board; Romish bishops of the 
South are well represented ; and a Di- 
rector General is in the field. 

It is easy to see how Romish ceremo- 
nies and scenes would appeal to the Ne- 
gro. If this growing political force is 
favored by the elevation of Taft to the 
executive chair, with Roosevelt's influ- 
ence continued, the church will be liable 
to at least advance toward the point at 
which it aims, when its propaganda will 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



draw large support from the public treas- 
ury, and union of church and state, will 
have begun to be restored. 



ROMANISTS OBTAIN INDIAN FUNDS. 

What are known as the "Treaty" and 
"Trust" funds of the Sioux Indians are 
available for the use of the Catholic In- 
dian missions in the Rosebud reservation 
in South Dakota. This is in accordance 
with a recent decision of the courts . The 
two funds amounted to $27,000, of which 
the trust fund was $3,000, and the treaty 
fund $24,000. The judgment of the low- 
er court allowed the use of the $3,000, 
but enjoined the Commissioner of In- 
dian Affairs, the Secretaries of the 
Treasury and Interior, the Treasurer of 
the United States, and the Comptroller 
•of the Treasury, against all of whom 
suit was brought, from paying money to 
the Catholic Bureau out of the $24,000 
fund. 

We are indebted for these facts to the 
School Journal, and cannot but believe 
that the Indians were far from united in 
hoping for such a decision. We are re- 
minded of the Cherokee Indian who re- 
sponded to Romanist advances, "We goi 
done worshiping idols." 



The United Home Protectors, a frater- 
nal organization of Michigan, has gone 
into the hands of a receiver. 



KNIGHTS OF THE ROYAL ARCH. 

Knights of the R,oyal Arch, as the new 
organization is termed, was formed in 
California some years ago, and is said to 
be heavily backed financially by the retail 
liquor dealers of the coast and of the 
East. The motto is, "Fidelity ad Alios, '' 
which, translated, means "Fidelity to 
Others," and it is not denied by the men 
who joined the secret body that its pur- 
pose is to protect the business of selling 
liquor at retail, even to taking a hand in 
politics. 

'This is a fraternal and beneficial or- 
ganization, not limited to retail liquor 
dealers or to men interested in the liquor 
business in other ways," said Secretary 
James. "We are banded together for 
mutual protection in a businesslike way. 
Yes, we may get into politics later." 



The new organization, to a certain ex- 
tent, is patterned after the newly formed 
Liberty League, of Chicago, which, is 
making a stand against the Prohibition 
wave in the Central West. 



Rev. H. A. Day writes that in these 
days of incubators and patent brooders, 
one can never know what will be hatched 
out next. Women have called their hus- 
bands, "You old Goose," and men have 
called their women "Goosies," but here's 
the real thing, Ganders, Goslings, Golden 
Egg and all. What next? 

Blue Geese are a new strain. 

Order of Blue Goose. 

Lansing, Mich., March 3. — Sixty-five lead- 
ing fire insurance men of the state attended 
the annual meeting of the Order of the Blue 
Goose here to-day. Officers for the ensuing 
year were elected as follows: 

Most Loyal Gander — A. F. Powrie, Bay 
City. 

Supervisor of the Flock — J. Wobrien, 
Grand Haven. 

Custodian of the Goslings — W. D. An- 
drews, Lansing. 

Guardian of the Nest — J. W. Beck, De- 
troit. 

Wielder of the Quill— F. W. Andrews, De- 
troit. 

Keeper of the Golden Goose Egg — H. A. 
Barteli, Detroit. 



INITIATED, SUES FOR $10,000. 

Special to the Gazette. 

Brookhaven, Miss., March 6. — Suit has 
been filed for $10,000 damages by F. 
Abraham against the negro Order of 
Odd Fellows, the plaintiff basing his 
claim on injuries alleged to have been 
received while undergoing initiation re- 
cently. 



Was Washington a Mason? By 
President C. A. Blanchard. Forty-eight 
pages and cover. Price, 10 cents, post- 
paid. In the introduction the author 
says : "I have for years been intending 
to present with some care the relation 
of George Washington, General of the 
Colonial armies during the Revolutionary 
War, and first President of the United 
States, to Freemasonrv. I do not think 
that this duty should be longer delayed, 
and will now attempt as carefully as I 
can to discuss this question, which, from 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



3 



one point of view, is unimportant, but 
from another is' of the 
to all thinking people." 



from another is 1 of the highest interest 



IS IT A MASONIC CHURCH? 

Justice O'Gorman in the Supreme 
Court in New York has granted a cer- 
tificate of incorporation to. a religious 
society to be known as the "First Bahai 
Assembly of New York." 

The objects of the society are stated 
to be : 

To regularly hold and conduct relig- 
ious and educational meetings and ser- 
vices according to the tenets of original 
and fundamental Judaism, Christianity, 
Mohammedanism, and all other true re- 
ligious systems, as fulfilled in and 
summed up, elaborated and promulgated 
by and through the divine teachings of 
the Bahai revelation, and to enable its 
members and attendants and their fami- 
lies and friends to observe the same. 



The money in the organizing of lodges 
has attracted a certain class of ministers. 
One such is the Rev. F. Smiley, of Okla- 
homa, who has been touring certain por- 
tions of Pennsvlvania in the interests of 
Eagleism, the saloon lodge. 

The expenses for new members of the 
Maccabee order, last year, was pub- 
lished as $75,500.00. Twelve thousand 
new members were added at a cost of 
$6.50 per member. Some ministers can 
make more, probably, at six dollars a 
head for new lodge-members than they 
can preaching, and have better success. 
We think it is to their credit that they are 
not in the pulpit. 

A preacher is now canvassing Illinois 
for the American Stars of Equity. In 
Van Orin he felt called upon to state that 
the insurance could be had without be- 
longing to the lodge. 



We have known for some time that 
lodges vary the initiation services, at 
times, in order to secure certain members 
whose names will be valuable to use in 
securing other new members. It seems 
that for the purpose of obtaining a cer- 
tain name they will take a person into the 
lodge by proxy. A flaming headline in 
the press announced last fall that Presi- 



dent Roosevelt was to be a Warrior, 
when the Red Men got through with: 
him. The article closed by saying that 
"it is not even known whether he will be 
given all 'work' or part of it, or whether 
he will merely be one of a class to see 
the work exemplified on somebody else. 
Doubtless this will depend largely on the 
President's wishes/' 

A young man told us that he refused 
to join a secret society, but finally con- 
sented to become a member of what he- 
was assured was not secret. He gave his 
name and paid his dues and took a seat 
in what proved to be a secret lodge. He 
had been lied to because he was popular 
among young men and his name was 
wanted. In a suburb of Chicago an in- 
fluential man was taken into the Oddfel- 
lows in the same manner — that is, with- 
out any initiatory ceremonies. 



SAVE FROM SIN. 

We think our readers will be much in- 
terested in a newspaper item concerning 
revival services in the church of which. 
Rev. D. W. Rose is pastor. "The revi- 
val continues with much interest and 
profit. Rev. Stoddard will speak for 
about twenty minutes this evening upon 
the subject, 'The Unchristian Influence- 
of the Lodge System.' Revival service 
will follow this talk." 

A people revived under such a pastor 
will doubtless stay revived. 



At the last General Conference of the 
Wesleyan Methodist church it was de- 
clared by that body that the greatest re- 
v!va 1 s hnve come to the churches where- 
pastor and people have kindly but firmly 
kept from compromise with the lodge 
and other sins and insisted on separation. 
We quote from its report : 

Wesleyan Methodists the country over have 
courage to heartily champion the great re- 
form movements of our time, unpopular 
though they are. * * * 

Possihly a more unpopular reform than 
Prohibition is the crusade against organized 
secrecy. The secret place is the cover of sin 
of every nature, and he who would lift the 
covering cannot expect to stand in great fa- 
vor with those whose evil deeds and ill-gotten 
gain are thus exposed. Yet on this great 
question Wesleyan Methodists have an in- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



•creasing conviction tbat the underlying prin- 
ciple of the secret order is wrong, aaid the 
•courage that goes with this conviction is so 
rstrong tbat one may travel the Connection 
over and scarcely hear a dissenting voice 
from the present policy of the Church on this 
subject. Moreover, if such a word should 
be spoken here or there it is sure to be found 
that that sentiment has been an element of 
weakness in the past and that the work there 
has suffered for the lack of courage to stand 
true to the principles of the Church. At the 
same time it will be noticed that the greatest 
revivals have come to the churches where 
pastor and people have kindly but firmly kept 
from compromise with any sin and insisted 
'On separation from all worldly conformity. 



Rev. Mervin V. Jacobs, pastor of the 
"Baptist church of Pine Plains, N. Y., re- 
cently joined the Poughkeepsie branch 
of the Elks. Yesterday, April 5, 1908, 
his congregation, by a majority of three, 
voted to ask his resignation for the of- 
fense. 

Mr. Jacobs said to-day that represen- 
tations have been made to him that if he 
will withdraw from the Elks his congre- 
gation will reinstate him. 

"I am not that kind of man," said the 
clergyman. "When I take a stand, I 
know that I am right. I will stick to my 
•position." 

The church would have been justified 
in its course if the Elks were not more 
than half as objectionable as they are. 

Following the murder of Capt. Will- 
iam Morgan the Baptist churches gener- 
ally adopted testimonies excluding from 
fellowship determinately adhering lodge- 
men. Most of these churches have re- 
turned like the hog to its wallowing in 
the mire. All the more praise then to the 
Pine Plains Baptist church for its fidelity 
to its trust. 



LODGE MEMBERS DOMINATING THE 
CHURCH. 

The Monongahela presbytery of the 
United Presbyterian church in Pennsyl- 
vania yesterday dismissed the charges 
against the Rev. Dr. William H. Knox, 
pastor of the Wylie Avenue United 
Presbyterian Church, by thirty members 
~x>f his flock. Dr. Knox asserted that the 
trouble arose because most of the mem- 



bers of the session and board of trustees 
are affiliated with secret societies. 

A church that permits its members to 
be affiliated with secret societies, sooner 
or later will be dominated by them. The 
dominating spirit in the lodge is Satanic. 



TRUE AND UNTRUE. 

He was a dog ; 

But he stayed at home 

And guarded the family, night and day. 
He was a dog 

Tbat didn't roam : 

He lay on the porch or chased the stray, 

The tramps, the burglar, the hen, away ; 

For a dog's true heart for that household 
beat, 

At morning and evening, in cold and heat. 
He was a dog. 

He was a man; 

And didn't stay 

To cherish his wife and children fair. 
He was a man ; 

And every day 

His heart grew callous, its love-beats rare. 

He thought of himself at the close of the 
day, 

And, cigar in his fingers, hurried away 

To the club, the lodge, the store, the show. 

But he had a right to go, you know — 
He was a man. 
— The United Presbyterian. 



RED WHITE MAN'S BIG TALK. 

The visitors, members of Motoaca 
Council, No. 19, Improved Order of Red 
Men, were met at the trolleys by the 
proper committee, escorted to K. of P. 
Hail, and there listened to the following 
able address by Charles Headley: 

''Ladies and Gentlemen: — 

"We have assembled together to-night 
to promote harmony and create interest 
in the Degree of Pocahontas. Wah-Stel- 
la's membership is limited to a handful 
of hard-working ladies. We are all 
working for the goal that all Christian 
churches are striving for, with all due 
respect for the churches. I believe 
churches are right and proper. But we 
take up the work where the churches 
leave off. We are in duty bound to aid 
each other in adversity, both spiritually 
and financiallv." * * * 
— Ocean City Ledger. 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



-,Uf. -: t' .** 







THE OPEN ROAD 

A SEQUEL TO "ADVENTURES IN CONTENTMENT" 

BY DAVID GRAYSON 

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY THOMAS FOGARTY 

AN ADVENTURE IN FRATERNITY 



>*^pHIS, I am firmly 
convinced, is a 
strange world, as 
strange a one as 
I was ever in. 
Looking about 
me I perceive that 
t h§ simplest 
things are the 
most difficult, the 
plainest things 
are the darkest, 
the commonest 
things, the rarest. 
I have had an 
amusing adven- 
ture. 

This morning 
when I went to town for my marketing 
I met a man who was a Mason, an 
Oddfellow and an Elk, and who wore 
the evidences of his various memberships 
upon his coat. He asked me what lodge 
I belonged to, and he slapped me on the 
back in the heartiest manner, as though he 
had known me intimately for a long time. 
(I may say, in passing, that he was trying 
to sell me a new kind of corn-planter.) I 




could not help feeling complimented — 
both complimented and abashed. For I 
am not a Mason, nor an Oddfellow, nor 
an Elk. When I told him so he seemed 
much surprised and disappointed. 

"You ought to belong to one of our 
lodges," he said. "You'd be sure of 
having loyal friends wherever you go." 

He told me all about his grips and passes 
and benefits; he told 
me how much it would 
cost me to get in and 
how much more to stay 
in and how much for a 
uniform '(which was 
not compulsory). He 
told me about the fine 
funeral the Masons 
would give me; he said 
that the Elks would 
care for my widow and 
children. 

" You're just the sort 
of a man," he said, 
" that we'd like to have 
in our lodge. I'd en- 
joy giving you the grip 
of fellowship." 




6 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



He was a rotund, good-humored man 
with a shining red nose and a husky voice. 
He grew so much interested in telling me 
about his lodges that I think (I think) he 
forgot momentarily that he was selling. corn- 
planters, which was certainly to his credit. 

As I. drove homeward this afternoon I 
could not help thinking of. the Masons, 
the Oddfellows and the Elks— and cu- 
riously not without a sense of depression. 
I wondered if my friend of the corn- 
planters had found the pearl of great price 
that I -have been looking for so long. For 
is not friendliness the thing of all things 
that is most pleasant in this world ? Some- 
times it has seemed to me that the faculty 
of reaching out and touching one's neigh- 
bor whde he really lives is the greatest 
of human achievements. And it was with 
an indescribable depression that I wondered 
if these Masons and Oddfellows and Elks 
had in reality caught the' Elusive Secret 
and confined it within the insurmountable 
and impenetrable walls of their mysteries, 
secrets, grips, passes, benefits. 

"It must, indeed," I said to myself, 
"be a precious sort of fraternity that they 
choose to protect so sedulously." 

I felt as though life contained something 
that I was not permitted to live. I recalled 
how my friend of the corn-planters had 
wished to give me the grip of fellowship 
— only he could not. I was not entitled 
to it. I knew no grips nor passes. I wore 
no uniform. 

"It is a complicated matter, this fellow- 
ship," I said to myself. 

So I jogged along feeling rather blue, 
marveling that those things which often 
seem so simple should be in reality so 
difficult. 

But on such an afternoon as this no man 
could possibly remain long depressed. 
The moment I passed the straggling out- 
skirts oi the town and came to the open 
road, the light and glow of the country- 
side came in upon me with a newness and 
sweetness impossible to describe. Looking 
out across the wide fields I could see the 
vivid green of the young wheat upon the 
brown soil; in a distant high pasture the, 
cows had been turned out to the freshening 
grass; a late pool glistened in the afternoon 
sunshine. x\nd the crows were calling, 
and the robins had begun to come: and oh, 
the moist, cool freshness of the air! In the 
higher! heaven (never so high as at this time 



of the year) floated a few gauzy clouds: the 
whole world was busy with spring! 

I straightened up in my buggy and drew. 
in a good long breath. The mare, half 
startled, pricked up her ears and began to 
trot. She, too, felt the spring. 

" Here,"- 1 said aloud, " is where I belong. 




I am native to this place; of all these things 
I am a part." 

But presently — how one's mind courses 
back, like some keen-scented hound, for 
lost trails — I began to think again of my 
friend's lodges. And do you know, I had 
lost every trace of depression. The whole 
matter lay as clear in my mind, as little 
complicated, as the. countryside which met 
my eye so openly. 

"Why!" I exclaimed to myself, "I need 
not envy my friend's lodges. I myself 
belong to the greatest of all fraternal orders. 
I am a member of. the Universal Brother- 
hood of Men." 

It came to me so humorously as I sat 
there in my buggy that I could not help 
laughing aloud. And I was so deeply 
absorbed with the idea that I did not at 
first see the whiskery old man who was 
coming my way in a farm wagon. He 
looked at me curiously. As he passed, 
giving me half the road, I glanced up at 
him and cabled out cheerfully : 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



''How are you, Brother?'* 

You should have seen him look — and 
look — and look. After I had passed I 
glanced back. He had stopped his team, 
turned half way around in his high, seat 
and was watching me— for he did not 
understand. 

"Yes, my friend,"- 1 said to myself, "I 
am intoxicated — with the wine of Spring] " 

I reflected upon his astonishment when 
I addressed him as "Brother." A strange 
word! He did not recognize it. He ac- 
tually suspected that he was not- my 
Brother. 

So I jogged onward thinking about my 
fraternity, and I don't know when I have 
had more joy of an idea. It seemed so 
■explanatory! 

"I am glad," I said to myself, "that I 
am a Member. I am sure the Masons 
have no such benefits to offer in their 
lodges as we have in ours. And we do not 
require money of farmers (who have little 
to pay). We will accept corn, or hen's 
eggs, or a sandwich at the door, and as for 
a cheerful glance of the eye, it is for us the 
best of minted coin." 

(Item: to remember. When a man asks 
money for any good thing, beware of it. 
You can get a better for nothing.) 

I cannot undertake to tell where the 
amusing reflections which grew out of my 
idea would finally have led me if I had not 
been interrupted. Just as I approached 
the Patterson farm, near the bridge which 
crosses the creek, I saw a loaded wagon 
standing in the road ahead. The horses 
'seemed to have been unhooked, for the 
tongue was down, and a man was on his 
knees between the front wheels. 



U jj . '■#♦ f: ; ■-, 







Involuntarily I said: 
"Another member of my society: and in 
distress!" 

I had a heart at that moment for any- 
thing. I felt like some old neighborly 
Knight traveling the earth in search of : 
adventure. If there had been a mistress 
handy at that moment, I feel quite certain. 
I could have died for her, if absolutely 
necessary. 

As I drove alongside, the stocky, stout 
lad of a farmer in his brown duck coat 
lined with sheep's wool, came up from 
between the wheels. His cap was awry,, 
his trousers were muddy at the knees where 
he had knelt in the moist road, and his 
face was red and angry. 

A true knight, I thought to myself, looks 
not to the beauty of his lady, but only to her 
distress. 

"What's the matter, Brother?" I asked 
in the friendliest manner. 

"Kingbolt gone," he sajd gruffly, "and 
I got to" get to town before nightfall." 

"Get in," I said, "and we'll drive back. 
We shall see it in the road." 

So he got in. I drove the mare slowly 
and we both leaned out and looked. And 
presently there in the road the bolt lay. 
My farmer got out and picked it up. 

"It's all right," lie said. "I was afraid 
it was busted. I'm obliged to vou for the 
lift." 

"Hold on," I said, "'get in, I'll take you 
back." 

"Oh, I can walk." 

"But I can drive you faster," I said, 
and you've got to get that load to town 
before nightfall." 

I could not let him go without taking 

tribute. No 
matter what the 
story books say, 
I am firmly of the 
opinion that no 
gentle knight 
(who was hu- 
man) ever parted 
with the fair lady 
>* m - whose misery he 
had relieved 
without exchang- 
ing the lime of 
day, or offering 
her a bun from 
his dinner pail, 
or finding out 



(!■ 



8 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



(for instance) if she were maid 
or married. 

My farmer laughed and got 
in. 

"You see," I said, "when a 
member of my society is in dis- 
tress I always like to help him 
out." * 

He paused; I watched him 
gradually evolve his reply: 

"How did you know I was a 
Mason ? " 

"Well, I wasn't sure." 

" I only joined last winter," he 
said. " I like it first-rate. When 
you're a Mason you find friends 
everywhere." 

I had some excellent remarks 
that I could have made at this 
point, but the distance was short and king- 
bolts were irresistibly uppermost. After 
helping him to put in the bolt, I said: 

"Here's the grip of fellowship." 

He returned it with a will, but afterwards 
he said doubtfully: 

"I didn't feel the grip." 

" Didn't you ? " I asked. " Well, Brother, 
it was all there." 

"If ever I can do anything for you," he 
said, "just you let me know. Name's 
Forbes, Spring Brook." 

And so he drove away. 

"A real Mason," I said to myself, "could 
not have had any better advantage of 
his society at this moment than I. I 
walked right into it without a grip or a 
pass. And benefits have ajso been dis- 
tributed." 

As I drove onward I felt as though any- 
thing might happen to me before I got 
home. I know now exactly how all old 
knights, all voyageurs, all crusaders, all 
poets in new places, must have felt! I 
looked out at every turn of the road ; and, 
finally, after I had grown, almost discour- 
aged of further adventure I saw a man walk- 
ing in the road ahead of me. He was much 
bent over, and carried on his back a bag. 

When he heard me coming he stepped 
out of the road and stood silent, saving 
every unnecessary motion, as a weary man 
will. He. neither looked around nor spoke, 
but waited for me to go by. He was weary 
past expectation. I stopped the mare. 

"Get in, Brother," I said; "I am going 
your way." 

He looked at me doubtfully; then, as I 







moved to one side, he let his bag roll off 
his back into his arms. I could see the^ 
swollen, veins of his neck; his face had 
the drawn look of the man who bears 
burdens. 

"Pretty heavy for your buggy," he re- 
marked. 

"Heavier for you," I replied. 

So he put the bag in the back of my 
buggy and stepped in beside me diffidently. 

"Pull up the lap robe," I said, "and be 
comfortable." 

"Well, sir, I'm glad of a lift," he re- 
marked. "A bag of seed wheat is about 
all a man wants to carry for four miles." 

"Aren't you the man who has taken the 
old Rucker farm?" I asked. 

"I'm that man." 

"I've been intending to drop in and see 



you, 



I said. 



"Have you?" he asked eagerly. 

"Yes," I said. "I live just across the 
hills from you, and I had a notion that we 
ought to be neighborly — seeing that we. 
belong to the same society." 

His face, which had worn a look of set 
discouragement (he didn't know beforehand 
what the Rucker place was like!), had 
brightened up, but when I spoke of the 
society it clouded again. 

" You must be mistaken," he said. " I'm: 
not a Mason." 

"No more am I,"- 1 said. 

"Nor an Oddfellow." 

"Nor I." 

As I looked at the man I seemed to know 
all about him.. Some people come to us 
like that, all at once, opening out to some 
unsuspected key. His face bore not a few 
marks of refinement, though work and dis- 
couragement had done their best to oblit- 
erate them; his nose was thin and high, 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



9 



his eye was blue, too blue, and his chin 
somenow did not go with the Rucker 
farm. I knew! A man who in his time 
had seen many an open door, but who had 
found them all closed when he attempted 
to enter! If any one ever needed the bene- 
fits of my fraternity, he was that man. 

"What Society did you think I belonged 
to?" he asked. 

"Well," I said, "when I was in town a 
man who wanted to sell me a corn-planter 
asked me if I was a Mason — — " 

"Did he ask you that, too? "interrupted 
my companion. 

"He did," I said. "He did " and.I 

reflected not without enthusiasm that I had 
come away without a corn-planter. "And 
when I drove out of town I was feeling 
rather depressed because I wasn't a member 
of the lodge." 

"Were you?" exclaimed my companion. 
"So was I. I just felt as though I had 
about reached the last ditch. I haven't 
any money to pay into lodges and it don't 
seem's if a man could get acquainted and 
friendly without." 

"Farming is rather lonely work some- 
times, isn't it?" I observed. 

" You bet it is," he responded. " You've 
been there yourself, haven't you?" 

There may be such a thing as the friend- 
ship of prosperity; but surely it cannot be 
compared with the friendship of adversity. 
Men, stooping, come close together. 

"But when I got to thinking it over," I 
said, "it suddenly occurred to me that I 
belonged to the greatest of all fraternities. 
And I recognized you instantly as a charter 
member." 

He looked around at me expectantly, half 
laughing. I don't suppose he had so far 
forgotten his miseries for many a day. 

"What's that?" he asked. 

"The Universal Brotherhood of Men." 

Well, we both laughed — and understood 



After that, what a story he told me! — 
the story of a misplaced man on an unpro- 
ductive farm. Is it not marvelous how 
full people are — all people — of humor, 
tragedy, passionate human longings, hopes, 
fears — if only you can unloosen the flood- 
gates! As to my companion, he had been 
growing bitter and sickly with the pent-up 
humors of discouragement; all he needed 
-was a listener. 

He was so absorbed in his talk that he 
did not at first realize that we had turned 
into his own long lane. When he di>- 
covered it he exclaimed: 

" I didn't mean to bring you out of your 
way. I can manage the bag all right now." 

"Never mind," I said, "I want to get 
you home, to say nothing of hearing how 
you came out with your pigs." 

As we approached the house, a mournful- 
looking woman came to the door. My 
companion sprang out of the buggy as much 
elated now as he had previously been de- 
pressed (for that was the coinage of his 
temperament), rushed up to his wife and led 
her down to the gate. She was evidently 
astonished at his enthusiasm. I suppose 
she thought he had at length discovered his 
gold mine! 

When I finally turned the mare around, 
he stopped me, laid his hand on my arm 
and said in a confidential voice: 

"I'm glad we discovered that we belong 
to the same society." 

As I drove away I could not help chuck- 
ling when I heard his wife ask suspiciouslv 

"What society is that?" 

I heard no word of his answer: only the 
note in his voice of eager explanation. 

And so I drove homeward in the late 
twilight, and as I came up the lane, the 
door of my home o*pened, the light within 
gleamed kindly and warmly across the 
darkened yard: and Harriet was there on 
the step, waiting. 




?4? 



£=z*gg^^ffl^J* ffi 



— From the March number of The American Magazine; copyrighted, 190S, by 
the Phillips Publishing Co. By permission. 



10 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



€otttrilmii0tt0* 



A CORRECTION AND EXPLANATION. 

BY THE REV. J. H. LTNDEMEYER. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, April 15, 1908. 
Christian Cynosure, Chicago, 111. : 

Dear Sir — The article in the Cynosure, 
"An Anti-Secret Lutheran. Pastor/' has 
placed me in a false light with many of 
my brethren. It leaves the impression 
that I had a "lodge fight," and, unable 
to cope with the difficulty, had applied 
to the Cynosure for aid. The facts are 
these : The Cynosure, through its secre- 
tary, asked me if I could arrange for a 
convention in Council Bluffs,. I replied 
that while a convention would be very 
desirable for this lodge-ridden town, it 
would not be possible for me to arrange 
for one — first, on account of the attitude 
of my charge ; and, second, on account 
of my doctrinal convictions. Had the 
Cynosure published my reply verbatim, 
and then made its comment thereon, my 
brethren would have understood my posi- 
tion. 

We "Missouri Lutherans" have con- 
victions. We Relieve that we have and 
teach and confess the entire word of God 
in all its truth and purity. We oppose 
the lodge because God's word plainly 
forbids it, especially in 2 Corinthians 6 : 
14-18; but we are just as loyal to an- 
other word of God, Romans 16:17. I 
mentioned the "Preformed Church." I 
employed the word "Reformed" in a 
technical sense, embracing all those 
Protestant churches which deny the "real 
presence" in the Lord's supper. There 
is a great and serious difference between 
our church and the "Reformed" on that 
doctrine. We accept the plainly reveal- 
ed word (Matt. 26:26-28; Mark 14:22- 
24; Luke 22:19, 20; 1 Cor. 11:23-29), 
while the Reformed follow "reason" and 
see naught but emblems, signs, or a mem- 
orial, in the supper. For us to meet in 
a convention with pastors of the Reform- 
ed persuasion, worship with them and 
call them full-fledged brethren, would 
plainly be a violation of Romans 16:17, 
tantamount to sanctioning their false 
doctrines and saying there is really little 
difference between us ; that it matters 



very little whether a church accepts all 
of God's word or changes some of it to 
suit "the reason." 

We also take exception to the "total 
abstinence" and "American" (?) Sab- 
bath doctrines, which are often advanced 
in the Cynosure. 

To say: Let us meet as citizens, will 
never do. The Reformed pastors would 
not, even as citizens, deny their reformed 
phraseology. Things would be said to> 
which we must take exception or deny 
the truth. The only proper way for us 
to do would be to discuss our differences 
and, having adjusted them according to 
God's word, meet in perfect harmony. 
Meeting in convention on any other basis 
would be but an agreement to disagree 
in some points and agree in others. 

I am frank to say that I do not un- 
derstand the position of the Cynosure 
people. They are in church fellowship' 
with men they call false prophets (011 
the lodge question) ; they criticize these 
men in their writing, warn against them, 
yet meet in church conventions with 
them, call them brethren and remain in 
the same church body. We could not 
do so: To say we must be charitable is 
no scriptural reason. The charity which 
God demands is to avoid them. There 
is no denying it. The "Reformed" have 
caused divisions and offenses in the 
church of the Reformation through their 
doctrines. We must avoid them as we 
must avoid those who teach falsely on 
the lodge. 

We are often called "narrow-minded." 
Let those who,: indulge in such weak 
arguments show us a scripture which 
demands fellowshiping false teachers. 
I think the narrow-minded man is the 
one who, unable to meet his opponent's 
argument, cries out "narrow-minded," 
"intolerant," etc. 

Do not misunderstand me. We are 
indeed thankful that many of the Re- 
formed teach many of the eternal veri- 
ties of God's word. We call them re- 
formed "churches" We could not call 
them churches if we believed there were 
no Christians in their communion and 
none of the Christian doctrine. Those 
who do not understand our doctrine often 
say that we claim we are the "only 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



11 



-church," out of which none can be sav- 
•ed, etc., etc. Such is not the case. But 
we have the conviction that we have the 
full truth and nothing but the truth ; that 
where others disagree with us they are 



wrong. 



This letter may be lengthy, but it is 
impossible to set forth these truths in a 
small space. Besides, I believe that we 
Lutherans who subscribe to the Cyno- 
sure, and who would certainly aid it 
more substantially if it were not for its 
"unionism and syncretism," have as 
much right to let our "views" be known 
(if you will call them so) as those of 
•other churches do in their letters. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren — I am 
minded to take up this month an old, 
■old story — the story of 

Masonic Charity. 

I am glad that the agitation of years 
has checked the talk on this subject 
somewhat. Many years ago we heard 
about Masonic charity continuously ; now 
it is seldom mentioned. Yet, because it 
is mentioned, it is proper to take it up 
•once in a while, and I give you the latest 
illustration of it which has come to my 
knowledge. 

We have all read of the wonderful 
work of the Chicago avenue church dur- 
ing the stress of the last few months 
in Chicago. Finding that large numbers 
of honest men were hungry, that church 
advertised that all sober men, out of 
work, who would report at the church 
at 6:45 a. m., and attend a preaching 
service after breakfast, might have 
breakfast without charge. There were 
sixty-two at the first breakfast, and the 
number rose rapidly, until over one 
thousand seven hundred were fed. I 
do not know what the average number 
was — probably in the neighborhood of a 
thousand. The men were evidently very 
needv. One of them was known to drink 
seven cups of coffee. The average num- 



ber of cups of coffee drunk by each man 
was four, and each man ate about seven - 
eighths of a loaf of bread. To many 
of them it was the only meal of the day. 
Among the rest who came, one morn- 
ing, was a young Scotchman, whose 
name I have but of course will not pub- 
licly mention. He was a plasterer by 
trade, and a member of the Masonic 
lodge, in good and regular standing. He 
landed in Chicago in the midst of the 
strike and winter's stress. Fie walked 
the streets for days, until his money — 
about seventy-five dollars — was all gone. 
His tools were pawned, and he had noth- 
ing to eat. He had the documents to 
prove himself a Mason in Scotland. He 
told the friends of the Chicago avenue 
church that he went to the Masonic Tem- 
ple and inquired for the relief bureau. 
Finding it, he showed his papers, certify- 
ing him to be a Mason in good and 
regular standing. The secretary in charge 
of the relief bureau threw down twenty- 
five cents on the table. The Scotchman 
looked at it and said, "Do you mean to 
say that this is what the Masonic fra- 
ternity does for me under these circum- 
stances ?" The secretary said, "Yes ; that 
is all you get ; take it or leave it. There 
are altogether too many of you Scotch- 
men around here." 

His shoes were worn out so that his 
feet were practically on the ground. In 
this condition he turned up at the church, 
and the church furnished him with food. 
One member of the church gave him 
clothes; another gave him money for 
shoes, and said to him, "As long as you 
are without work, I want you to come 
and take dinner with me every day." 
Directly they found employment for him. 
The first week he earned fifteen dollars, 
the second week he earned thirty-five 
dollars, and now he is doing well and 
putting money in the bank. One of the 



12 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



church members said to him, "I am sur- 
prised that a man like you should join 
the Masons." He replied, "I am sur- 
prised myself. It was drink, drink ail 
the time. That was the only thing I got 
out of Masonry." 

My impression is, that this case, if 
true, is an extreme one; but it is quite 
in line with many others which have 
come to my knowledge. 

I was once in an Iowa graveyard. 
There were two Masons' graves, side I)} 7 
side. One was unmarked, the other had 
a nice monument erected by Masons, and 
was surrounded by a neat iron fence. I 
said to my friend, who was a resident 
of the town, "Both of these men being 
Free Masons, why has one so much more 
attention than the other?" He replied, 
"The one whose grave is so nicely fixed 
had money, the other Mason was poor." 

I myself had in a congregation to 
which I ministered a woman who was 
about to go to California with a son 
and grandson. Her son was dying of 
consumption. He lived to get to Sacra- 
mento, but died within three weeks after 
reaching that city. The lady said to me, 
"My husband had been a Mason for 
many years, and in my distress I thought 
it no more than right to get back, if I 
could, a part of the money which he 
had paid to the lodge. I applied for 
help, but I could not get any. The lodge 
here in Illinois said they could not help 
me unless some California lodge would 
guarantee that they should receive the 
money again." I myself helped the 
woman and her son and grandson onto 
the train at Aurora, that they might Lake 
"The Overland" to California. 

I wonder whether these cases are ex- 
ceptional or not. Of course, sometimes 
Masons must fulfill the oaths which they 
take to "relieve Master Masons, their 
widows and orphans." But a false oath 



is a deadly thing. No one can rely upon 

it for anything good, and we have a right 

to be thankful if it does not work fatal 

evil. 

Compulsory Goodness. 

During the last month I have met, I 
think, three men on railway trains, who 
when asked if they were Christians, re- 
plied, "No, I am not a Christian, but 
I am a member of an order, which is 
as good or better than the church." Be- 
ing asked what it was, they replied, "The 
Masonic order." A well-dressed gentle- 
man from Boston said that to me yester- 
day. Being asked in what respect the 
lodge was better than the church, he 
said, "Well,, a Mason just has to keep 
his word; he has to do what he agrees 
to do." I said, "I know about the pen- 
alties, but is it right for Christian men 
to accept such penalties as having one's 
throat cut, one's tongue taken out, etc., 
etc. ?" He said, "Those do not amount 
to anything, but a Mason just has to da 
what he agrees to do." 

Paul said, The love of Christ con- 
strains me. Under this constraining love 
he wrought the marvelous work he did. 
Patiently, perseveringly, he marched from 
town to town, from province to province, 
everywhere carrying the glad news that 
Jesus Christ was come into this world 
to save men. But when a man is sworn 
to be good, and has no goodness in him ; 
when he is put under death penalties 
to be honest, to be benevolent, to be de- 
cent, the case is very difficult. Where 
there is no fidelity, everything else is 
dead and formal. Jesus said, I am come 
that men might have life, and that they 
might have it more abundantly. 

This is what men need — life. Living 
things can grow ; living things may 
change ; but dead things can only putrefy, 
or, if they are inanimate, remain as they 
are. 

That is the trouble with the whole 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



13 



lodge system of our country. There is 
no provision for making men spiritually 
alive; and one who is spiritually dead, 
will spiritually decay. 

In our time lodges are giving notice 
that they will not receive barkeepers, or 
men engaged in the liquor business. Now 
and again some lodge is making a rule 
that no intoxicating drinks are to be 
brought into the lodge room, etc., etc. 
Why do the lodges do this now ? Be- 
cause Christian sentiment is rising on 
this subject. Why did they not do it 
long ago? Because no power had creat- 
ed a public conscience on the subject. 
They can imitate the moral excellencies 
of Christians, but there is no life, no 

progress. 

When I was a young man, beginning 

my lecture work against the lodges, I 
used often to say, "There is not a Ma- 
sonic home for old people or for children 
anywhere in the United States." At 
that time there was not — at least there 
was not one of which I had heard. At 
the present time there are a number. 
The Oddfellows are also planting such 
institutions. We cannot speak as hap- 
pily about them as we could wish, for 
they are largely supported by public 
dances, card parties, balls, and other vul- 
gar ostentations, where there is plenty 
of liquor drinking and incitements to 
other sins. But why are they doing as 
much as this? Masonry is nearly two 
hundred years old. Odd fellowship is 
probably one hundred and fifty years old. 
Whv has not this sort of thinsr been done 
long ago? Simply because there has 
been a lack of life. Jesus Christ is the 
only One who ever made the dead alive, 
and those who will not come to him will 
not see life, but the wrath of God and 
the curse of death abides upon them. 

When men try to invent a plan by 
which to compel others to be good when 
they do not wish to be good, they will 



find in the end that they fail. "There 
is one God, and one Mediator between 
God and men, the Man Christ Jesus." 
There is no salvation in the law. 
Lodge Lawlessness. 

All persons familiar with college af- 
fairs know that college lawlessness large- 
ly originates in college fraternities. The 
schools where there are the most secret 
societies have the most difficulties in* 
management. Recently a State univer- 
sity, where secret societies and athletics 
have been the chief interest for many 
years, had a regular mob of students, 
who destroyed the property of a citizen, 
and resisted the officers of the law in- 
order to do so. In another university, i 
decent, quiet young man, who did not 
choose to be a secret society man, was 
maltreated over and over again by stud- 
ents who took it upon themselves to re- 
buke him. The poor fellow finally 
agreed, I believe in writing, that if they 
would haze him once, and after that let 
him go, he would submit to any abu>e 
they wished to inflict upon him. Is not 
this a pitiful state of things? And is it 
not wonderful that such savages can be 
tolerated in a civilized community? lazv, 
worthless young men, who live in idle- 
ness upon the labors of other people, and 
who receive an education at public ex- 
pense, or at the' expense of industrious 
and worthy persons? 

The whole secret society gang in our 
colleges, so far as it is actuated by this 
spirit, ought to be put at work on the 
public highways, with ball and chain, un- 
til it could learn ordinary decency. Idle, 
drunken fops, lying in wait, four, five, 
ten to one, for quiet, innocent fellows, 
ducking them in ponds, tieing them to 
trees, compelling them to submit to one 
indignity or another ; and when the Col- 
lege or university authorities undertake 
in a very mild way to defend the rights 
of the injured person, these same young 



14 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



men, without decency or shame, resist 
the authorities of the school or the city. 

It is a pity that the college professors 
of our country cannot be as courageous 
and brave as the high school teachers 
and principals. Almost without excep- 
tion, the latter publicly declare that secret 
societies are at the root of almost all 
school meannesses and disorders. The 
college men must know the same thing 
to be true respecting their own institu- 
tions, and yet there does not seem to be 
conscience enough to lead them to act. 
A Noble Exception. 

I am glad to report a noble exception 
to the above criticism. Rev. Dr. Rus- 
sell, of Westminster College, Pennsyl- 
vania, with his faculty, notified the secret 
society men that they must quit secret 
societies ; and when some of them ob- 
jected, they promptly suspended them 
and sent them home. There will be a 
little trouble in this college for a while, 
and after that there will be a good degree 
■of peace. 

No one supposes that the abolition of 
fraternities makes young men perfect, 
tmt every one who understands the facts 
knows that the abolition of those socie- 
ties prevents young men from working 
out their imperfections, to a large de- 
gree. 

Let us pray for our schools, especially 
for the schools of higher education ; that 
parents who desire to see their children 
strong and useful men and women keep 
them out of colleges where secret socie- 
ties are permitted to corrupt and destroy 
the young people ; and that the college 
authorities, which have too long neglect- 
ed their duties, take them up in a manly 
fashion, and thus meet the obligations of 
their position and prove themselves 
worthy to be teachers of young men. 
Lodges and Laws. 

Having been engaged for many years 
in securing offices for lodgemen, in pay- 



ing personal debts out of public money, 
in rescuing criminal brothers from the 
penalties of violated laws, the lodges are 
just now taking an advanced step. They 
are, as members of the legislatures, pass- 
ing laws to prevent persons from reveal- 
ing to the world the character of the 
oaths and penalties which secret orders 
require of their members. 

In a recent letter I spoke of the ac- 
tion of the Tennessee Legislature making 
it an offense for one who is not a lodge- 
man to have in possession a revelation 
of lodge work. The State Legislature or 
Massachusetts has just passed a law, 
which has been approved by the Gov- 
ernor of the State, having the same bale- 
ful purpose. It is more carefully drawn 
up, and the infringement of personal 
freedom involved in it is less evident 
than in the case of the Tennessee bill; 
but it has substantially the same pur- 
pose. It begins with provisions against 
clandestine lodgemen — persons who are 
trying to fool outsiders and get away 
their money, or claiming lodge authority 
for their actions. But in line 19 of sec- 
tion 2, the bill goes on to say, whoever, 
without such authority, fraudulently 
offers to sell, confer, communicate or 
give information, where, of whom, or by 
what means, the degrees or work, in. 
whole or in part, of such fraternity, as- 
sociation, society, order, organization or 
union can or may be obtained, conferred 
or communicated, shall be punished by 
imprisonment for not more than one 
year, or by a fine of not more than five 
hundred dollars, or by both such fine and 
imprisonment. 

It will be remembered that Massa- 
chusetts had a very bad pre-eminence in 
its subservience to the slave power. It 
was in Massachusetts, yes, in Boston, 
that Garrison was mobbed; that chains 
were stretched around the court house 
hall. Officials like those who passed this 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



15 



bill 'were' trying to get fugitive slaves 
back to their masters, to be whipped, 
branded, burned, or sold, as the masters 

might choose. 

Of course these laws will not stand. 
But they will stand long enough to make 
some trouble for God's people. In the 
end they will go to the scrap pile of the 
universe, where all such attempts to pro- 
mote falsehood and limit truth must find 
their resting place. There may have to 
be a few martyrs in our cause, as there 
have been in others. If so, all will be 
well. God will give grace to those who 
are to suffer, and if the truth is lifted 
up it will draw all men to it. 

Just as the insane lawlessness of the 
liquor power has brought about the 
movement which to-day we see and hear, 
so these efforts of lodges to make it un- 
lawful to reveal their lawless and anti- 
Christian organizations will react and 
forward the truth. 

Lodges, Tobacco and Whisky. 

A friend of mine, giving the reason 
for not going to the lodge, said to me 
one day, "I do not wish to go there and 
sit in tobacco smoke and hear a lot of 
old bummers telling off-color stories." I 
will not mention the order to which he 
belonged, for there are good men who 
have been deceived into it, and further- 
more, the hint which he gives as to lodge 
movements will apply to many others be- 
sides the one of which he was speaking. 

A fact has come to my knowledge re- 
cently which I desire to lay before my 
brothers who are earnest opponents of 
lodges and liquor shops, and who at the 
same time have not been convinced that 
tobacco using is an evil. I received the 
other day a report from the Washing- 
tonian Home in Chicago, for the past 
year. This report showed that last year 
1,138 men were admitted to that home. 
They went there to be cured of the liquor 
habit. I think more than a hundred of 



them had had delirium tremens. One 
of the terrible things in these homes is, 
the set of men who have to be strapped 
down on beds, their hands bound to- 
gether lest they should injure themselves 
or others. The superintendent reporting 
on these 1,138 men says, 1,108 of them 
used tobacco, thirty of them were not 
tobacco users. Such an awful statement 
as that requires no exhortation to follow 



it. 



The lodges of our country are one of 
the great means of promoting the to- 
bacco habit. They are one of the great 
means of promoting the liquor habit. As 
fast as Christian people make it disreput- 
able to drink liquor, or sell it, they will 
follow on. They wish members. They 
want to get enough decent members to 
give them standing in the community. 
These men will not go very often to the 
lodge meetings. They have homes and 
business, and they have no use for lodges. 
If they lend their names and pay their 
dues, the men who manage such orders 
are well pleased to have them away. 

But when men drink in the spirit of 

these - organizations, they are in great 

danger of both these habits which I have 

intimated. 

In a word, lodges are hostile to God, 

hostile to Jesus Christ, hostile to the 
church of Jesus Christ, hostile to man- 
hood. All who care for God and men 
should stand with us against them. 
Fraternally yours, 

Charles A. Blanchard. 



CHINA IS AGITATED. 

Washington. D. C, March 13. — A 
question beginning to agitate the Chinese 
people is the nomination of a successor to 
the throne. No less than 800 secret so- 
cieties throughout the Chinese empire, if 
opportunity offers, will raise their hands 
against the ruling dynasty. 



Peace and joy dwell in the home of 
love. 



16 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUR WORK. 

Five dollars each : E. W. Shaw, Wal- 
ler I. Phillips, J. C. Berg-, F. A. Wood, 
A. J. Millard, Rev. William Evans, B. 
Loveless, Rev. H. A. Day, las. E. Phil- 
lips, Dr.'N. S. do Couto (Brazil), Mrs. 
L. G. B. Hills,. A. D. Cline, Mrs. Julia A. 
Reed, Prof. E. Whipple, Miss Elizabeth. 
Kellogg, Mrs. M. E. McKee, W. B. 
Guild, J. P. Shaw, A. J. Loudenback, 
St., Rev. C. A. Blanchard, Rev. W. F. 
Cochran, Miss G. A. Noe, Wm. PL 
Guild; Reformed Presbyterian Church, 
Rev. Robert Clarke, pastor. 

D. Branchcomb, 55 cents ; Rev. V. S. 
Jensen, 50 cents; Charles Wallgren, 25 
cents. One dollar each: George Berry, 
Llias Good, E. Gould, B. A. Prichard, 
T. PI. Brenneman, C. S. Allen, John 
Thomas, Rev. J. P. Leaf, J. J. Van 
Wagnen, Rev. Geo. F. Mitchell, Rev. S. 
F. Sprunger, D. H. Harrington, P. J. 
Layman, PL L. Molyneux, Rev. L. N. 
Stratton, Joseph Hoffhines, Rev. C. D. 
Brooks, Tunis Allman, Rev. D. S. Paris, 
Mrs. Alice A. Miller, a member First 
Congregational Church, Oberlin, O. 

Ten dollars each: W. B. Stoddard, H. 
L. K., Rev. E. R. Worrell, Rufus Park, 
D. A. Straw, Misses Hildreth. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Stewart, $4; 
Philo C. Hildreth, $20; Julia Hulburt, 
$2.10; Wm. L. Avery, $1.25 ; Mrs. C. A. 
Johnson, $7.50; T. P. Kellogg, $15 ; Rev. 
H. H. Hinman, $15; Miss Nancy S. 
Coleman, $3.76; Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
Bond, $15.92. 

Three dollars each : J. B. Barnes, Rev. 
H. H. George, E, H. and E. L. Gould. 
Six dollars each: Mrs. H. W. Bourne, 
Mrs. J. Highland. Two dollars each: 
Rev. G. A. Pegram, Mrs. J. Siemiller 
and family, Mrs. Mary P. Smith. 

Wheaton College Church of Christ, 
$21.23; German Brethren Church, (El- 
gin, 111.'), $11.55; Christian Reformed 
Churches : Rev. S. S. Vander Heide, pas- 
tor, $25.27 ; Rev. K. Van Goor, pastor, 
$19.87; Rev. L. Veltkamp, pastor, 
$17.84; R.ev. B. H. Einink, pastor, 
'$26.31; Rev. J. Groen, pastor, $34.44; 
Theological Seminary of Christian Re- 
formed Church, Grand Rapids, Mich., 
$10; Estate Mrs. Lydia C. Andrews, 
$750. 



Mtm of ©ur Pori 



Good for Michigan ! The State Asso- 
ciation sends as delegates to our Annual 
Meeting, May 21st and 22d, its Presi- 
dent, Rev. J. W. Brink, of Muskegon, 
and its Lecturer and State Agent, Rev. 
G. A. Pegram. President Brink writes : 
"It will be a busy month for me by rea- 
son of preparations for our synod, which 
meets here in June, and on account of 
other work ; but, the Lord willing, I will 
be there, and if possible we will take a 
collection in our church for the National 
Christian Association before that time." 



The German Baptist Brethren are to 
have a great convocation in Des Moines, 
Iowa, beginning on the 3d of June. It is 
a bi-centennial gathering of the church, 
and so one of special interest. Our Pres- 
ident Blanchard has been invited to give 
a two-hours address before this body. He 
will doiibtless have an audience of 15,000 
or more. It will be a great opportunity 
as well as a great occasion. 



SECRETARY W. B. STODDARDS' 
REPORT. 

New York City/ April 18, T908. 

Dear Cynosure — There is of necessity 
much of sameness in our work. I rind 
human nature much the same in the dif- 
ferent parts of the country visited. So 
long as men are yielding and sinful there 
will be need of such work as the Na- 
tional Christian Association has under- 
taken. 

During the month past my labors have 
been in eastern Pennsylvania, Maryland, 
New York and New Jersey. At Allen- 
town, Pa., I found much to encourage. 
My meetings there were in the churches 
where our good friends, O. D. Seward 
and F. D. Geary, minister. These, with 
our ex-State President, W. S. Gottshall, 
and others, showed me kindness and aid- 
ed in the work. Several who had re- 
nounced lodges rejoiced in the N. C. A. 
work. 

A most cordial welcome awaited the 
Baltimore, Md., work. Pastor Stefrms, 
of the Missouri Synod Lutheran church, 
had done his work of advertising well. 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



17 



A thoughtful, interested people greeted 
me in the fine hall connected with this 
church. In addition to their contribution 
in aid of our work, an invitation to come 
soon again was given. My second lecture 
is announced for the evening of April 30. 

A few days at home gave opportunity 
for visits to some missions and churches 
where truth was presented. "Bob Down- 
ing'' (as he was known as an actor) has 
been holding evangelistic and other meet- 
ings in Washington, D. C, since his con- 
version a little over a month ago. He 
was exhorting sinners to accept Christ, 
at the same time displaying an emblem 
of the Mystic Shrine on his coat. He 
said, in urging the collection, "It's a good 
thing; push it along," and added, ''You 
K. of P.'s will know what I mean by 
this" — inferring, of course, that ordinary 
mortals would not know. If he con- 
tinues with this degraded, degrading 
thing called "The Mystic Shrine" he will 
do it in the face of light. That he has 
been an actor, and a good one, is evident 
from his language and expression. Peo- 
ple listen to what he says. 

During this visit to New York I have 
spoken in Free Methodist churches uf 
Brooklyn, N. Y., and Newark, N. J. ; in 
the German Lutheran church, of which 
Rev. J. Holthusen is pastor ; also the 
Christian Alliance training school, 
Eighth avenue and Forty-fourth street, 
this city. Lectures on the lodge question 
were given at all of these places and the 
usual expressions of appreciation receiv- 
ed from the friends. I addressed a society 
of young men in the Lutheran church. 
The invitation was from 8:30 to 9:30 
p. m. Questions and discussions kept us 
together until after 10:30. Those ad- 
dressed at the Alliance training- school 
were young gentlemen and ladies pre- 
paring for missionary work. Several ex- 
pressed a desire for N. C. A. literature 
and were directed to headquarters, of 
course. 

A run out to Sayville, Long Island, re- 
vealed the fact that the seed sown by 
your agent one year ago had been very 
fruitful. At least three had given up 
their connection with the Foresters' 
lodge, while a large number had formed 
opinions adverse to the lodges. It was 



said, the lecture was discussed in the 
stores some two months or more after 
it was delivered. If the Lord wills I am 
to speak again in the Christian Reformed 
church, West Sayville, N. Y., October 
6th, next fall. 

My plan is to give several lectures in 
this section and hold the New York-New 
Jersey State Convention during that 
month, instead of November as in other 
years. ' Many lectures are being planned 
for October. I am indebted to Domines 
Vander Ploeg, Bouma, Kosten and others 
for kindness shown. I plan to visit Cor- 
ona, Long Island, this afternoon, where 
I remain over Sabbath with our good 
friend and co-worker, C. A. Lagvifle. 

En route to the N. C. A. annual meet- 
ing I plan to stop for meetings at Union- 
town, Pa., Youngstown and Columbus, 
Ohio; Peru and Fort Wayne and other 
points in Indiana. Yours in the work, 

W. B. Stoddard. 



REV. G. A. PEGRAM'S LETTER. 

Hart, Mich., April 18, 1908. 
Dear Cynosure : 

April 2d I visited Holland and spoke 
in the Central Avenue Christian Reform- 
ed chapel, on "Lodge Religion," and at 
the Ninth Street Christian Reformed 
Church, on "Lodge Religion and Oaths." 
The arraignment of the Lodge was high- 
ly appreciated, and a vote of thanks for 
the address was given, besides an invita- 
tion was extended to come again. 

April 1 2th I preached both morning 
and evening at the Wesleyan church at 
Ferry; in the morning on "Separation 
from the World." Lodgemen seemed 
very uneasy but much affected and con- 
victed. In the evening I preached on Ihe 
work of the Holy Spirit on the will. Peo- 
ple seemed helped and blessed, and re- 
quested me to come again. 

On the 16th and 17th of April I gave 
two Bible readings in Hart, for the Bap- 
tists and United Brethren. At various 
times I have given about half a dozen 
parlor talks on Secrecy. Sold quite a 
number of books and distributed tracts. 
Opposition to Secrecy seems to grow 
continually. 

Yours for righteousness, 

G. A. Pegram. 



18 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., April 1/1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips — lam still after 
the old Beast. ' I was down to Sarassa, 
Ark., the third Sunday in last month, 
and while visiting from house to house 
I met an Odd Fellow. ' I asked if his 
lodge was a good thing to be in. He 
said, "Oh, yes, it is as good as the church. 
We have the same Bible and the same 
songs that they have in the church. We 
are better than the church in some ways, 
because we take care of our sick." I 
replied, "Jesus told you to take care of 
the sick before you ever knew what a 
lodge was." He said, "Yes, but we did 
not do it; so the lodge will make men 
take care of each other." I said, "Well, 
you see you have got another god." r He 
said, "How is that?" I answered, "Jesus 
told you to visit the sick, but you would 
not obey Him; but you went to a man. 
on earth, just like yourself, and were 
initiated in the lodge, and then got down 
on your knees and worshipped him as 
a god. Whatever he tells you to do, you 
will obey." He said, "We had better 
obey. If we don't, we; will have to pay 
for it," I said, 'What will you tell 
Jesus when you come. 4n judgment be- 
fore him?" He said, "Oh, God is merci- 
fuh" I said, "Yes, and God is just. If 
you don't obey Him your end will be in 
hell." He said, "We are Christians in 
my lodge, except a few." I said, "Plow 
can you be a Christian and serve the 
devil? If one of . your lodge brethren 
should tell your secrets, and they cast 
lots to kill him, and suppose the lot 
should fall to you, would you kill him?" 
He said, "No." I said, "If you did not 
kill him, you would disobey your god." 
He said, "That, has been tried right here 
in this lodge. One of our brothers gave 
away some of our secrets, and they set 
a night to kill him." I asked, "Did the 
lot fall to you?" He said, "No, the lot 
fell on some other brother. I told them 
it was a sin to kill a man away from 
his wife and little children, but they 
would not listen to me. They set the 
night to kill him. They were going to 
kill him in the lodge hall." I said, "Your 
lodge room is upstairs right over the 
church." He said, "That did not make 



any difference. They met there to kill 
this man just the same." I said, "Did 
they kill him?" He said, "No, they did 
not kill him. I would not let them kill 
that good man away from his wife and 
children." I said, "How did you keep 
them from killing him?" He said, "I 
carried a forty- four calibre, blue-steel,. 
Colt pistol up into the lodge room that 
night, and when they gathered round and 
caught hold of the man, I was standing 
looking at them, and I threw my hand ia 
my bosom and said, 'Men, if you kill 
that man to-night, there will be more 
men die than one.' I told them to sus- 
pend him, but 'don't you dare kill jiim/ 
'You had better let that man loose. If 
you don't, I am going to kill you as long 
as there is a ball left in this pistol.'" 
"Did they let him loose?" I asked. He 
said, "You bet they did." I said, "Are 
you still in that lodge ?" He said, "Yes."' 
I said, "Do you think that is as good as 
the church ? All of the members wanted 
to kill that man but you. Does the Bible 
teach men to kill each other?" He said,. 
"No, it don't ; and since you have got 
me to discussing the thing, I will tell 
you there is not any Bible in it, because 
they will kill a man if he tells their 
secrets." I said, "Where will men go 
that will kill their brothers, and say they 
are serving God?" Pie said, "They will 
go to hell." I said, "Yes; they will': 
and if you stay in the lodge, you v. Ill 
go with them. Every man in that hall 
that night ought to have been put in the 
State's prison, except the one they were 
preparing to kill, and you in the bunch, 
because you had a big pistol and were 
ready to kill some of your brothers, in- 
stead of coming out. and trying to save 
them from hell." He did not get angry,, 
but he soon left. He loves the order,, 
and I made him feel bad over it. 

Last Sunday I was at Humphrey, Ark., 
at a board meeting, and Rev. D. L. Lind- 
say preached Sunday night to a crowded 
house, He preached against the lodge- 
god, and while he was preaching three 
lodge men went out, muttering some- 
thing. One spoke plainly enough to be 
heard all over the house. He said, "That 
is not so," because Elder Lindsay said 
that the lodges, with all their old lies,. 



May, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



19 



were not in the Bible. After they went 
•out, Rev. Lindsay preached so they came 
back into the church and said they were 
not angry. Rev. Lindsay said that any 
man that would get angry at God's Word 
was a fool. They seemed to get ashamed 
•of themselves. 

I tell you, Brother Phillips, the whisky 
and the lodges have got to go. God is 
angry with the people for their idolatry. 
Some of the people are getting their eyes 
open to this great sin. Thank God, the 
light has come. God's preachers are 
throwing off the devil's yoke. The day 
is coming when God's ministers will not 
"be blindfolded any more. Go on, dear 
■old Cynosure, let men and women know 
about the devil's traps. God bless the 
National Christian Association and i#s 
'band of officers. 

Yours for the Master's cause, 

(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



OUR KENTUCKY LETTER. 

Pikeville, Ky., March 20, 1908. 

Dear Bro. Phillips — We are giving the 
people the truth. The old Gospel plow 
is running deep, uncovering sins and 
showing up spiritual wickedness in high 
places. We have been led by the Spirit 
into homes in and around our town, and 
have been holding cottage prayer-meet- 
ings, and people are accepting the truth. 
Some are coming out of their lodges and 
confessing up and telling the secrets of 
the lodges. Praise His dear and precious 
name. He will honor you whenever you 
honor Him. We find that warning 
against no other sin will stir people iike 
the lodge evil, therefore I am fully per- 
suaded that it is the greatest evil that we 
have to contend with to-day. 

I had a conversation with some lodge 
people a few days ago in the office where 
I am at work. There were some twenty- 
five or thirty people present, among 
whom was a preacher and he belonged 
to the Odd Fellows. They said that if 
a man lived up to the teachings of the 
lodge he would be all right. The Lord 
gave me words. I commenced by say- 
ing: "I was once an Odd Fellow, but 
when I got salvation I had no more 
use for the lodge." And when Jesus' 
name is not mentioned there can be no 



salvation from sin. During my talk 
several spoke up and said: "Boys, he is 
telling the truth; we were once Odd 
Fellows," while others got stirred, and 
some got mad, and the poor old preacher 
picked up his traps and disappeared. 

We are looking for a great victory 
here in Jesus' name. 

Yours for God and His cause, 

A. D. Cline. 
Pikeville, Ky., April 16, 1908. 

Dear Bro. Phillips — We are still in 
the fight and pressing the battle out on 
the firing line. We have been on the 
street holding open-air meetings, and the 
Holy Ghost has had the right of way 
and many have been convicted of sin, 
and the Lord is honoring the truth. It 
pays to mind God and give people the 
truth if you have to take the street to 
do it. People are continually coming to 
the office where I am at work and seek- 
ing to know the truth about secret so- 
cieties. They say that if they can see 
any wrong in them they mean to leave 
them. The lodge people are disturbed 
in our town ; they realize that their king- 
dom is shaken. 

We are holding meetings every Sun- 
day and cottage prayer-meetings through 
the week. People are getting saved, leav- 
ing their lodges, tobacco and all other 
evils. The people are paying the price 
and obtaining salvation from all sin. 
Glory to God, He is able. We are ex- 
pecting great things in the name of our 
Captain. 

A man came into the office this morn- 
ing who made the remark that he be- 
lieved in the kind of religion that I ad- 
vocated, with the exception of my op- 
position to the lodge, and said, "If a man 
thinks a lodge is evil he ought to tell 
of the evil without exposing the secrets." 

I said, "Well, brother, if I was to 
get into a pit and some one came along 
and rescued me, what would you think 
if I should just go along and never warn 
any one else of that pit?" 

He said, "Of course you would do 
wrong if you did not tell people and warn 
them/' 

May the dear Lord bless you and your 
work, and I am constrained to believe 
that God will. 



20 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



Pray for me that I may give people 
the truth and not keep back any of the 
price. Your brother, 

A. D. Cline. 



REV. H. P. GRAY'S REPORT. 

Russell, Minn., April 16, 1908. 

Dear Brother Phillips — I visited Coun- 
cil Bluffs, Iowa, April 3d, and spoke the 
same evening at the Union City Mission 
and arranged for a service at the Ger- 
man Evangelical Lutheran church for 
Sunday evening. Preached Saturday 
again at the Union City Mission. The 
superintendent is willing to give the use 
of the mission for an anti-lodge conven- 
tion whenever desired. 

Had a good meeting at the German 
Evangelical Lutheran church Sunday 
evening. Notice had been given in 
Council Bluffs and Omaha papers and 
subject announced. This alone had a 
strong effect. A Nonpareil (Council 
Bluffs daily paper) reporter was pres- 
ent at the meeting and gave about two 
inches mention in the Monday morning 
paper. 

Rev. F. A. Case, pastor of First Bap- 
tist church, said he would try to arrange 
a meeting later. His is a strong church 
and in the heart of Council Bluffs. I 
think he would be willing to have a con- 
vention there. I am acquainted with Mr. 
Case. He recently gave a stunning tes- 
timony against lodges, in the Council 
Bluffs Ministerial Association. 

I went to Coin and tried to arrange 
for a meeting, but the way seemed closed. 
I found the M. E, minister, Rev. Ed- 
ward Pruitt, an anti-lodge man, but un- 
informed in regard to the real, inside 
condition. I gave him a bird's eye view 
of some of it and the tract "Graciously 
Delivered" and a copy of the Cynosure. 
The United Presbyterian minister of 
Coin is in sympathy. with the movement, 
but had previous arrangements at his 
church. I sold a copy of "Modern Secret 
Societies." The M. E. church here has 
four hundred members. Some months 
ago the M. E. pastor of Yorktown ex- 
changed and preached a straight anti- 
lorlge sermon to this large congregation. 
I talked with a banker who formerly was 
a Mason. He told me there was nothing 



in it for him and he had left it. I talked 
with three other Masons and certainly 
got next to them on the subject. They 
will not forget the heart truth I gave 
them. 

I went to Blanchard and tried to ar- 
range for a meeting, but the time did not 
seem to be opportune. I visited the M. 
E. pastor, Mr. Guest, and found him a 
no-lodge man, but unwilling to have a 
meeting in his church. He said he would 
come if a meeting was held. 

Not having heard from Rev. McGaw 
whether there were any subscript; .>ns 
back of the expenses, I concluded I 
could not stand all expenses myself and 
went home to Auburn. The ten dollars 
received from the N. C. A. and $1.82 
collection was all expended for car fare, 
hotel, and cards for subscriptions, and 
about one dollar out of my own pocket. 
I spoke to nine ministers on this sub- 
ject and others, and spoke three times 
in the one week. Had expenses been 
back of me, I would have continued. 
They are estimated at fifty dollars per 
month. When expenses are forthcom- 
ing I shall be glad to resume. Cordially, 

H. P. Gray." 



FROM REV. F. J. DAVIDSON. 

We had a very glorious meeting in 
many ways. The lodge question was 
very thoroughly discussed pro and con. 
Revs. T. W. Lott, J. C. Leonard and 
myself defending the church, while Rev. 
T. A. Head, Mr. G. W. Baxtrum and 
Prof. C. C. Wilson championed the 
lodge. Although Mr. Wilson conceded 
the righteousness of the anti's conten- 
tion, yet he thought it not timely to pass 
a resolution condemnatory of the lodge, 
since they are doing much good. Senti- 
ment in the audience was about evenly 
divided, but upon a vote to table, the 
loder was victorious. 

1 find quite a bitter feeling toward my 
course on the lodge question since the 
Conference adjourned. What the end 
may be, I know not, but one thing I do 
know, God's Word is true, and my con- 
tention is right. 

I pity my poor deluded people whose 
eyes are blinded to truth. I have decid- 
ed to stand for God and His Word, 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



21 



even though it cause me to relinquish my 
pastoral care of the church. I ask the 
prayers and assistance of the faithful 
that I may be strengthened to stand and 
give God glory. 

Yours for righteousness, 

Francis J. Davidson. 

Cairo, 111. 

(This should have appeared in a for- 
mer number of the Cynosure. Bro. ; Da- 
vidson has resigned his pastorate and is 
again serving the National Christian As- 
sociation. — Editor. ) 

FROM HOME GUARDS. 

The lodge question is warming tip 
some in Blackwell, Okla. A brother in 
the Baptist church here (a deacon) said 
that he didn't like to use the expression, 
but that I was raising a little Hell by 
my opposition to Masonry, and that I 
might as well hit him as to hit his lodge. 

I told him he had as well begin to 
dodge, because I expected to let fly at 
every opportunity. 

Rev. George A. Creekmore. 



I am sendinp- literature to the officers* 
of the Salvation Army in different parts 
of the world. In each open letter I send 
two of my own tracts and one from your 
office, sometimes two. If you read my 
tract you will see I have advertised the 
Cynosure, and also your tracts and some 
books exposing secret societies. I had 
3,000 tracts printed and don't intend to 
send any of them through the mail alone, 
always put some of yours in as well. I 
felt especially led by the Lord to work 
on this line. I am sending tracts to min- 
isters in the Methodist Church in Austra- 
lia, New Zealand, Tasmania and South 
Africa. I have spoken against secret 
societies in the Salvation Army in Keno- 
sha. Wis., and in the S. A. Barracks, and 
on the street. The Lord gives me liberty 
to speaking very plain. And I thank the 
Lord for giving me a good strong voice. 
I studied secret societies in Australia, but 
I did not get the light I needed until I 
got the Cynosure, and tracts and books 
from your office. I feel sure God is 
guiding me. When I have used up the 
1,000 tracts I received from you, I will 
send you another order. 

You wrote me a while back to send re- 



port of work I was doing. This is my 
report. A. J. Farley. 

Zion City, III. 

I was a M. W. A. for many years. 
After listening to two of Rev. F. A. 
Phelps' talks on lodges, I went to the M. 
W. A. clerk and told him that I would 
withdraw. He said that I was a f 00! ; 
but better be a fool and save my soul, 
than to be lodge wise and go to hell. 

John W. Dallenbach. 

I am a Methodist preacher. I joined 
the Freemasons' lodge seven years ago. 
(For which I would be ashamed and sor- 
ry were it not for the fact that I have 
been enabled, I think, to save some other 
young men from the same mistake.) 

I left the lodge, never to return, after 
the third degree. I had heard of your 
literature and was anxious to see some 
of it. I think I shall need several tracts 
in the future. 

Rev. R. Flayl. Davis. 

I felt so deeply impressed with the 
need of doing something to rescue men 
from the lodges or fraud churches, that 
1 could not resist some action. I think I 
felt somewhat like the prophet Elijah 
when he thought all had become wor- 
shipers of Baai. But I was astonished to 
learn that there were 7,000 that had not 
bent the knee to the idol. When I re- 
ceived a copy of the Cynosure I was 
greatly relieved to know that younger 
and abler men were doing so great a 
work. 

I believe the secret orders are the anti- 
christ of this present time, and that you 
are engaged in a work not second to the 
great reformation in Luther's time. 

(Rev.) Nellis Klock. 



Christ or the Lodge, by Rev. Fran- 
cis Alfred Phelps, 730 West 64th street, 
Chicago, is a booklet of 20 pages. Price 
10 cents. The author has been very suc- 
cessful in bringing souls out of sin into 
holiness in Christ Jesus. One of those 
saved by him from the sin of secretism 
will give an account of his deliverance 
from lodge bondage at our Annual 
Meetitig, May 21st and 22d. Write to 
the author at above address for a copy of 
his admirable exposition of his subject. 



22 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



NATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 



ANNUAL MEETING 




Chicago Avenue Church 



Chicago ^uenue (£lE)ooDp) Cfturcft 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

May 21st and 22nd, 1908 



COME, LET US REASON TOGETHER" 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



23 



ClhursDap 
horning 
6@ap 21st 
10:00 SD'docft 



^fjiirgtiap 
afternoon 
2:00 2D'cIocfc 



^TbursDap 
(Kbening 
7:30 £D'doc& 



tlTfiur^tia^ S^otnmo: Session 

President C. A. Blanchard, Chairman 

DEVOTIONAL SERVICES— Rev. H. P. Gray (Presbyte- 
rian) , Iowa State Agent. 

BUSINESS— READING OF MINUTES OF LAST SES- 
SION; ANNUAL REPORTS OF OFFICERS; AP- 
POINTMENT OF COMMITTEES, ETC. 



Rev. C. A. Blanchard, D. D., Chairman 

DEVOTIONAL SERVICES— Rev. Frances E. Townsley, 
Assistant Pastor First Baptist Church, Austin, Illinois. 

MUSIC 
Moody Institute Quartette 

SHORT ADDRESSES— Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull (ex-Re- 
bekah), Star Prairie, Wisconsin; Mrs. Amanda Smith, 
colored evangelist (ex-heroine of Jericho), Harvey, Illinois; 
Mrs. Frances C. Blanchard, Wheaton, Illinois — Subject: 
"Juvenile Lodges;" Rev. Mary L. Moreland, Chicago, Il- 
linois — Subject: "Some of the Reasons Why the Church Is 
the Greatest Organization in the World ; ' ' and other speakers . 



Wbut&tov (Etaiing fe^ton 

Rev. B. H. Einink (Christian Reformed Church), Chicago, 

Chairman 

DEVOTIONAL SERVICES— Rev. John Earle, D. D., Pas- 
tor, Belden Avenue Baptist Church, Chicago. 

MUSIC 
Moody Institute Quartette 

ADDRESS "WHY I AM NO LONGER AFFILIATED 
WITH SECRET ORDERS"— W. H. Boles, Lecturer 
and Editor, and Pastor of Christian Church, Christopher. 
Illinois. 

MUSIC 

Moody Institute Quartette 

ADDRESS — "FOUNDED ON THE BIBLE"— President 
Charles A. Blanchard, Wheaton College. 



24 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



JFrinap 

39ap 22nU 
9:00 jTcIocfe 



iFriHap 
Afternoon 
2:00 SD'docfe 



JFrinap 
©bcning 
7:30 SD'cIocIt 



JFn&ai? Ranting fee^^ton 

Rev. A. G. Johnson (Radical United Brethren), Huntington, 

Indiana, Chairman 

DEVOTIONAL SERVICES— Rev. F. J. Davidson, Southern 
Agent, National Christian Association. 

BUSINESS— REPORTS OF COMMITTEES; ELECTION 
OF OFFICERS; READING OF LETTERS FROM 
ABSENT MEMBERS; UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

MUSIC 

OPEN PARLIAMENT— General Topic: "THE SECRET 
SOCIETY PERIL, AND HOW TO MEET IT." 



JFcidap Mtztnoon &*00ton 

Rev. J. S. McGaw (Reformed Presbyterian), Morning Sun, 

Iowa, Chairman 

DEVOTIONS— Rev. G. A. Pegram, Michigan State Agent. 

MUSIC 
Moody Institute Quartette 

SECEDERS' CONFERENCE— Reverend Samuel H. Swartz 
(Oddfellow), Pastor M. E. Church; E. Y. Wool ley (Free- 
mason), Assistant Pastor Chicago Avenue Church; J. W. 
Dallenbach (Modern Woodmen of America) , member of 
United Evangelical Church, Symerton, Illinois; Rev. Ernest 
Lee Thompson (five secret societies) , member of Rock River 
M. E. Conference; Rev. L. G. Bears (four secret societies, 
among which is Junior Order of American Mechanics), 
Pastor Wesleyan Methodist Church, Peru, Indiana. 

MUSIC 
Moody Institute Quartette 

TESTIMONY MEETING— (Members of lodges are invited to 
participate.) 



iFri&ap (Hunting; &*ggion 

Rev. B. E. Bergesen (Lutheran), Chicago, Chairman 

DEVOTIONS— Rev. William Evans, D. D., Wheaton, Illinois. 

MUSIC 
Moody Institute Quartette 

ADDRESS— "THE ETHICS OF SECRET SOCIETIES"— 
Rev. A. C. Dixon, D. D., Chicago. 



May, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



25 





INDEX TO 

VOLUME XL. 

(For the twelve months ending- April, 1908) 



NOTE An asterisk, thus *, in connection with a page number, indicates that the item opposite 

which it appears was printed without regular beading. Such items are indexed under titles showing 
their general bearing. 



CONTRIBUTORS. 



Hinman, H. II. 

Brenner, William. 
Blanchard, Charles A. 
Millard, A. J. 
Stoddard, W. B. 
Pegram, G. A. 
Baxter, J. S. 
Woods, Mrs. Lizzie. 
Davidson, Francis J. 
Brakeman, E. 
McKee, Joseph. 
Leeds, Josiah W. 
Stoddard, James P. 
Cline, A. D. 
Chase, S. A. 
Stewart, T. W. 
Nyvall, D. 
Samson, A. A. 
Bender, C. 
Barton, W. E. 
Einiuk, B. H. 
Ebey, C. B. 
Harrington, D. H. 
Tront, I. B. 
Kletzing, H: F. 
Baker, Mrs. Mary C. 
Johnson, Mrs. J. R. 
Thompson, E. L. 
Lee, O. T. 
McKee, Mrs. M. E. 
Hoekenga, P. J. 
Cook, Ezra A. 
Creekmore, George A. 
Hill. John E. 
Smith, Cyrus. 
Maguire, C. W. 
Shea ley, George W. 
Hughart, C. E. 
Howe, J. 
Long, Harry P. 
Hotz, A. J. 



Falkenstein, G. N. 
Davis, J. L. 
Paden, William C. 
Swartz, Samuel H. 
Smith, Mrs. Amanda. 
Evans, William. 
Alwood, J. K. 
Lipp, A. B. 
Deveneau, N. W. 
Foster, J. M. 
Brink, John W. 
Stratton, L. N. 
Richards, J. A. 
Brodfuhrer, J. C. 
Stough, Henry W. 
Haavind, Julius. 
Williams, J. E. ■ 
Rarden, Miss Jessie E. 
Smith, II. R., Jr. 
Stevenson, R. M. 
Ronayne, Edmond. 
Ward, C. B. 
Dixon, A. C. 
Proctor, S. F. 
Henderson. Win. H. 
Thomson, A. 
Bergesen, B. E. 
Roth. S. E. 
Gray, H. P. 
Thompson, H. D. 
Wilcox, M. C. 
Matson, Albert. 
Tucker, Jasper J. 
Adrian. T. J. 
Rosenberger, I. 
Fellenbauni, I. 
Highland, Mrs. 
Cook, C. II. 
George. II. II. 
Gillespie, II. L. 
Bandy. W. S. 



J. 

II. 

J. 



F. 



Witmer, A. E. Mast, I. S. 

Merrill, A. R. Jensen, H. 

Kelsey, Mead A. McCoy, R. A. ] 

Bears, L. G. Durr, J. N. 

Hitchcock, J. M. Beahm, I. N. H. 

Wright, Milton. Rose, Dudley W. 

Martin, R. H. Yaukey, J. S. 

Myers, T. T. Speer, Robert. 

Malcolm, A. M. Zahniser, A. D. 
Scott, George A. 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 
Portraits. 

Adams, John Quincy March cover 

Blanchard, Charles A 197 

Carradine, B 223 

Dixon, A. C 163 

Evans, WTlliain 81 

Groen, John April cover 

Group of Delegates to Annual Convention. 67 

Hildreth, Edward 109 

Hinman, H. H 72 

Hitchcock, J. M 357 

Kellogg, Henry Louis June cover 

Millard A. J 103 

Needham, George C 223 

Pegram, G. A 328 

Phillips, Wendell 226 

Ritner, Joseph October cover 

Smith, Mrs. Amanda 73 

Smith, H. R., Jr 112 

Stoddard, James P 69 

Stough, Henry W 100 

Torrey, R. A 300 

Webster, Daniel 259 

W r eed, Thurlow 193 

Woodward, J. Constant 213 

Miscellaneous. 

Chinese Masonic Lodge at Work 140 

"Shake, Brother" (Cartoon) 5 

Some Typical Highbinders 171 

Wheaton College ^ 



26 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



TOPICAL INDEX. 

American Society of Equity. 

American Society of Equity 179 

Dynamite in His Wheat 180 

Secret Order Methods to the Surface 179 

Ancient Order of Hibernians. 

Cardinal Gibbons Praised the A. O. H 293 

Molly Maguires 291 

Priest Bars Hibernians 192 

Rector of St. Mary's Church Again Talks 
of His Opposition to the A. O. H 294 

Black Hand. 

Black Hand Code of Torture Made Pub- 
lic 381 

Duty of Italians 317 

Four Members of the Black Hand Cap- 
tured 222 

Nobilio-Morgan — The Black Hand, a Rel- 
ative of Masonry 123 

No Escape from Black Hand 123 

Palisades Assassins 306 

Panic Follows Work of "Black Hand" 30 

Secret Society Penalty 243 

Sinister Oath of the Black Hand 123 

Some Black Hand Convictions 222 

Sues Black Hand .470 

Chinese Secret Societies. 

Chinese Masonic Funeral * . . . 140 

Chinese Political Secret Society 315 

Chinese Triads 172 

Heathen Chinee — Chinese Masons, Hep 
Sing Tong, On Leong Tong and High- 
binders 172 

Hep Sing Tong and Freemasons 171 

Nine Secret Society Murderers — The Hep 

Sing Tong 356 

Some Typical Chinese Highbinders 171 

Eagles. 

Drinking in Lodge of Eagles 188 

Eagles' Memorial Service 45 

Liquor Bill of Eagles' Lodge *257 

Eastern Star. 

Ancient Degree of O. M. (Old Maid) 50 

Order of the Eastern Star 317 

Elks. 

Benevolence and Protection . • 124 

Bryan Locked Out 314 

Elks and "Deers" Dance 129 

Elks Mourning for Their Dead 261 

Elks Ran Too Fast 203 

Elk Teeth to Be Used No More 33 

Maine Elks Get Drunk *257 

Negro Elks May Use Emblems 45 

No Negroes Need Apply — To Enjoin Ne- 
gro Elks 203 

Philadelphia's Appropriation for Enter- 
tainment of the Elks *33, 97 



Foresters. 

Foresters *347 

Foresters Hold Sunday Initiation ....... 130 

Fraternities in Schools and Colleges- 
Hazing, Etc. 

Another Notch on the Brake 13 

"Anti-Frat" Movement 220 

Balks at Grave in Initiation 225 

Chicago Stamps out "Frats" 290 

Conclusively Exclusive (Tau Beta Beta 

Sorority) 34 

Damages for Hazing 244 

First Secret Society 315 

Flank Movement — Y. M. C. A. and School 

Fraternities 354 

Fraternities and Secrecy 357 

Fraternities and Yale Scholarship 339 

From Ball to Church Memorial (Theta 

Delta Chi) 14 

Ghouls at Amherst 207 

Grand Rapids Yotes Against Public 

School Lodges 30 

Hazing Nuisance 314 

High-School Brand of Fraternities 54 

High School Fraternities 350 

High School Fraternities — Testimony to 

Their Baneful Effects 190 

Immorality in High School Fraternities . . 360 

Initiate Receives Death Wound 244 

"Initiation of Norma" 131 

President Blanc-hard's Letters 

38, 198, 262, 334, 360 

Purdue University Fraternities 40 

Regulation to Be Strictly Enforced in 

Chicago *177 

Root Out the Fraternities 221 

School Abuses 130 

School Fraternities 262 

Singularly Fraternal — Boy Is Initiated. .305 
Sorority Initiation — President Blanchard's 

Letter 334 

To Fraternity Students 276 

Washington in Line — No More Fraterni- 
ties , 305 

Westminster College and Greek-Letter 

Fraternities 383 

Freemasons. 

Action of the Associate Synod of Scotland 

Concerning the Masonic Oath *177 

American Triumvir— Hon. Thurlow Weed. 193 

Anniversary of the Morgan Murder 

September cover 

Anomaly — Masonry a Religion? 355 

Antiquity of Masonry *34 

Black Hand, a Relative of Masonry 123 

Broken Rule — Masonry and Romanism. . .270 

Can a Mason Travel More Safely? *4 

Carry Nation to Masons 189 

Edmond Ronayne's Letter — The Religion 
of Masonry 132 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



27 



Chinese Masonic Funeral 140 

Extra Luggage — Lodge Titles 98 

Fair Nets $70,000 for Masonic Temple... 42 
Fatuous Tendency — Reiteration of Claims 

Accepted as Demonstration 367 

February Twenty-Second — George Wash- 
ington, John Quincy Adams 321 

"Freemasonry Among Pirates" 6 

Freemasonry in India — President Blanch- 
ard's Letter 133 

Freemasonry — My Experience In and Out 

of the Lodge 346 

From Arkansas — A Baptist Preacher on 

Masonry 17 

From Edmond Ronayne 132, 348 

Gen. Wm. Booth and the Masons *16 

Grand Master of the Grand Encampment. 267 

Heathen Chinee — Chinese Masons 172 

Hep Sing Tong and Freemasons 171 

Honest but Misguided HI 

Hon. Joseph Ritner, of Pennsylvania. .. .161 

Important to Theological Students 364 

Jesuits Have Masonic Army and Navy 

Officers Under Suspicion 189 

Letter to a "D. D." in Pittsburg 218 

Letter to a Minister on Masonry 27 

Maekey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry. . 4 
Masonic Admission — Masonry in Politics. 289 

Masonic Cornerstone Laying 178 

Masonic Jesuits 46 

Masonic Poem *114 

Masonic Theology 205 

Masonic Tolerations 371 

Masonry the Embodiment of All Truth. . . 53 

Masons on Public Occasions 225 

Masons' Wives 99 

Missions and Masonry 137 

"Morality Veiled in Allegory" 355 

Naturally — Few Men of Character Attend 
the Lodge 225 

New Massachusetts Abolitionist 339 

Oldest Mason Died in the Almshouse 130 

Only Most Worshipful Master 215 

Ordinary Antimasonic Experience 216 

Origin of Freemasonry 29 

Parable of the Sower 304 

Pastor's Experience 277 

Permanent Hiatus — Masonic Noninforma- 
tion 55 

Personal Experience — Masons Defeat Jus- 
tice 188 

Political Catholicism and Masonry 372 

President Blanchard's Letter 8 

Profane Travesty — Masons Celebrate Eas- 
ter 44 

Really! "The Freemasonry of the Ante- 
diluvian World 51 

"Robber of the Desert" 6 

Seceder's Testimony 346 

Snare Is Broken (Seceder's Testimony) .148 
Tammuz 50 



Testimony of Adhering Masons 5& 

That Big Little "If"— Social Side of Ma- 
sonry 245 

Training Men to Murder 337 

Universalist Church and Masonry 324 

Unprofitable Exchange — Forfeiture of 

Character 43 

Valuable Gift — An Old Masonic History.. 177 
Washington, Booker T., Becomes a Mason. 272 

"When Teddy Rode the Goat" 129 

Why I Am an Anti-Lodge Man 301 

AVorship at Fraternal Homes 150 

Would Not Encroach Upon Landmarks. . .370 
See "Eastern Star" and "Knights Tem- 
plar" in Topical Index. 

Good Templars. 

Decadence of Good Templary 15 

Independent Order of Good Templars — 

Hon. Neal Dow's Testimony 15 

Too Much Christianity 15 

Hunchakists. 

Police Now Have Full Details .180 

"Reformed Hunchakist Society" 180 

Insurance Lodges. 
Made Free Indeed (Seceder s Testimony) .214 

President Blanchard's Letter 229 

Royal Arcanum Insurance Steal *289 

Thai Lodge (Seceder's Testimony). 28 

Jesuits and Romanism. 

Broken Rule — Masonry and Romanism. .270 

In a Catholic Hospital 218 

Jesuits Have Masonic Army and Navy 

Officers Under Suspicion 189 

Jesuits Regaining Power in Italy 189 

Masonic Jesuits 46 

Political Catholicism and Masonry 372 

Romanism Against Education 268 

Vatican and Lodge 46 

See "Ancient Order of Hibernians." 

See "Knights of Columbus." 

Knights of Columbus. 

Columbus Day '. 243 

Serpents in the Eagle's Nest 110 

Knights of Khorassan. 

Khorassan Clan at Greenville 122 

Knights of Khorassan 122 

Knights Templar. 

Grand Generalissimo and Illustrious and 

Imperial Potentates 33 

Knights Templar Observe Ascension Day. 221 
Seceder's Testimony 346 

Labor Unions. 

First Black-List Suit 150 

Gomperism in Washington 13 

How Can Two Walk Together? 189 

I. W. W.— How the West Dealt with One 

Labor Union 195 

Judge Loring's Injunction 150 

Law of Labor 1-1 



28 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



Manufacturers to Combat Unionism 219 

Ministers' Union Cast Out of the Trades 

and Labor Assembly 179 

New Zealand Arbitration 99 

President Blanchard's Letter 229 

Reckless Drivers 109 

Supreme Court Decision Against Labor 

Unions 338 

Trade Union Against Civic Union 178 

Tyranny of Labor Union 353 

Union Drivers Held up I. O. O. F. Pa- 
rade 203 

Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Arabs in Modern Athens 358 

Grand Generalissimo and Illustrious and 

Imperial Potentates 33 

Noibles of the Mystic Shrine 196 

Queer Prediction 99 

Shriner Jurors in Thaw Trial 4, *33 

Shriner Wreck 43 

Vice-President a Shriner 4 

What Is a Shriner? 369 

Oddfellows. 

Churches and Wholesale Liquor Dealers. 339 

Colored Oddfellowship .306 

Covenant with Hell Disannulled (Seced- 

er's Testimony) .271 

Degree of Suppressed Truth 269 

Died After Initiation ~ 12 

Lodge Charity 348 

Oddfellows Forced to Pay 289 

Oddfellows Not to Exclude Wholesale 

Liquor Dealers 187 

Oddfellow Statistics 122 

Religions of the World 130 

Seceder's Testimony 346 

Sherman Churches Are Peculiar — Do Not 

Attend and Hear Sermon to Oddfellows. 86 
Union Drivers Held up I. O. O. F. Pa- 
rade 203 

Worship at Fraternal Homes 150 

Order of the Serpent. 

Great Serpent Has Many Victims 220 

Snakes Hold Revelry . . 158 

Red Men. 

No Fire Water Among Red Men 225 

Smaller Liquor Men Barred from the Or- 
der of Red Men 203 

Miscellaneous Lodges 
A. O. U. W— Montana A. O. U. W. in 

Court . 322 

Babi and Episcopal Union 139 

Camorra Victim Dying 47 

Court of Honor . . *42 

G. A. R.— Got Death Benefit from G. A. R.120 

"Gobblers" *295 

Heroines of Jericho — Seceder's Testi- 
mony 27, 73 

Knights of Labor — Seceder's Testimony. .271 
Knights of Malta * 9 



Knights of Pythias — Hardly Damon 52 

Know-Nothing Party 31 

Kokoalers Koming 316 

Modern Brotherhood of America 196 

New Saloon Lodge — Liberty is the White- 
wash Word 354 

Owls — A New Order 272 

Patriotic Order, Sons of America *104 

"Red Death"— Mysteries of 29 

National Protective Legion 380 

National Union '. *105 

New Ku Klux Klan 312 

"True Reformers" — New Order. 4 

GENERAL INDEX. 

Act of Tennessee Legislature 359 

Adams, John Quincy — February Twenty- 
Second 321 

Address of Welcome at Ohio Convention. .112 

Agent Baxter's Report 20 

Agent Davidson's Reports 

21, 60. 93, 117, 153, 182, 212, 254 

Agent Pegram's Reports 

19, 58, 94, 117, 154, 181, 208, 249, 282, 343, 379 
Agent Smith's Reports. 118, 155, 185, 211, 252 
American Triumvir — Hon. Thurlow Weed . 193 

Annual Meeting 379 

Annual Meeting, 1908 — Snyopsis of Pro- 
gram . .• „ 367 

Anti-secret Lutheran Pastor 372 

Anti-secret Work in Maine *56 

Appreciates Dr. Blanchard's Book 245 

Associate Synod of Scotland — Action Con- 
cerning Masonic Oath *177 

Attention, Iowa ! 347 

Berea College to Have New School for 

Negroes 274 

Beware of False Prophets 368 

Boys Copying Men ... < 260 

Call to Michigan Friends 248 

Carry Nation on Secret Societies 17 

Christianity and the Jews 257 

Christianity versus Religions 100 

Christian Science (By A. C. Dixon, D. D.) 

144, 163 

Church and Mysteries 206 

Churches and Lodges * 120 

Church Broader in Charity 12 

Clear the Way (Poetry) January cover 

Colored Pastors Getting Out of Lodges. *312 
Contributions Received for N. C. A.. 16, 151 

Covenants 228 

Dangerous Pin Point 47 

Delusive Teaching in Present-Day Preach- 
ing 81 

Denominations Represented on N. C. A. 

Board of Directors *181 

Doing Business for God 366 

Duty of Italians 317 

Eastern Convention Report — New York- 
New Jersey 286 

Educational Influence of the Lodge 71 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



29 



Elder, Git Qff'r Dat Goat (Poetry) 185 

Ethical Code for Lawyers 206 

Evangelical Lutheran Church and Secret 

•Societies 323 

Evangelist "Egged" 313 

Fraternal Compliments 305 

From Our Mail (Dent.) 

25, 63, 121, 157, 191, 214, 276, 310, 347, 379 

From Elder A. B. Lipp 279 

From Indiana State President 348 

From Oklahoma — Why Not Organize? 281 

From Rev. C. B. Ward of India *214 

From Woodburn, Oregon 187 

•German Lutherans Not to Participate in 

Lodge Funeral Services *243 

"God Is My Refuge" 1 

•Good Ministerial Example 3 

Good Words from Pennsylvania Friends.. 375 

Greatly Needed Books for China 274 

Great Work in Kentucky 187 

Holding His Ground 380 

How the Lodge Dominates the Local 

Church 173 

How Lodge Church-Members Manipulate 

the Local Church 238 

How Presiding Elders Cater to the Lodge. 328 
^'1 Belong to the Lodge" — Why Men Do 

Not Attend Church 29 

Injustice Properly Rebuked — Booker T. 

Washington Defended 319 

Indiana State Convention Minutes 247 

Indiana State Officers 248 

Iowa Convention Minutes 285 

Iowa State Officers 284 

Iowa State Work 368 

Light in Kentucky 277 

Lincoln, Abraham — From the Second In- 
augural February cover 

Lodge and Saloon *187 

Lodge and the Legislature 258 

Lodge Dominating the Church 35 

Lodge Goat 12 

Lodge Put to Flight 212 

Lodges Harden and Corrupt 310 

Lodges Utilizing Churches 268 

"Lodgism in the Churches 215 

McCosh's Testimony *292, *353 

Meaning of Cynosure 26 

Michigan Christian Association, Opposed 

to Secret Societies — Constitution and 

By-Laws 249 

Michigan State Officers 283 

Minister Attacks Lodges 350 

Missionary Platform *151 

Moody Bible Institute 14 

More Than Two or Three Witnesses 126 

Mormonism's Blight 289 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letters 

21, (52, 119, 156, 184, 210, 254, 282, 308, 354 
National Convention. 1907 1 

Report of Convention 65, 100, 142 



Address of Rev. J. P. Stoddard 68 

Address of Mrs. Amanda Smith 73 

Address of Rev. G. A. Pegram 76 

Convention Letters 87 

National Treasurer's Annual Report.. 87 

Address of A. J. Millard 102 

Address of Julius Haavind 104 

Annual Report of Eastern Secretary, 

W. B. Stoddard 107 

Needs of Our Work 351 

New England Christian Association An- 
nual Meeting 250 

News of Our Work (Dept.) 17, 56, 92, 112, 

150, 181, 208, 247, 281, 307, 342, 373 

New York-New Jersey State Officers 286 

Night or Morning (Poetry) 162 

Obituaries — ■ 

Jonathan Stevens Perham 16 

Edward Hildreth 109 

William Meredith 124 

J. Constant Woodward 213 

Joseph Harley 247 

J. W. Suidter 247 

John P. Scott 247 

J. I. Frazer 247 

Mrs. Gertrude F. Milton 247 

Mrs. Lydia C. Andrews 247 

John Harper *369 

Joseph E. Roy *369 

Oblivious Victims of Lodgery 54 

Ohio Friends, Attention ! — Introducing H. 

R. Smith, Jr 112 

Ohio State Officers 112 

Opportunities 44 

"Ought a Christian to Retain Membership 
in a Secret Society?" Answer by Evan- 
gelist R. A. Torrey 300 

Our Needs 150 

Our New Year 97 

Our Work— Its Needs 303 

"Passion King" (Book Review) 340 

Pennsylvania Convention 56 

Pennsylvania Convention Program 342 

Pennsylvania State Convention — Report of 

the Secretary 373 

Petty Practices of Lodges 203 

Phillips., Wendell (Poetry) 227 

Possibility of the Church and the Lodge 

Uniting 233 

President Blanehard's Appeal 107 

President Blanehard's Letters 

S, 38, 133, 198, 229, 201. 296, 334, 360 

Pretty Good — Lodge Animals 314 

Reply to Address of Welcome at Pennsyl- 
vania Convent ion 376 

Ritner. Joseph, of Pennsylvania 161 

Satan the Rival of the God of the BJfble. 42 

Scripture Selections 204 

Seeeilers' Testimonies — 

Amanda Smith (Heroines of Jericho, 
etc.) 27, *73 



30 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908. 



J. S. J. (Insurance Lodge) — "That 

Lodge" 28 

S. F. Proctor (Masonry) 148 

John E. Hill (Lodges and Insurance Or- 
ganizations) 214 

W. L. Freese (Knights of Labor) 271 

A. D. Cline (Oddfellowslrip)— "Cov- 
enant with Hell Disannulled" 271 

Isaac H. Fellenbaum (Several Lodges) 
—"Graciously Delivered" 310 

C. P. Dobson .346 

Silas T. Wolf (Two Lodges) . . .;. .346 

D. W. Brehm 346 

John C. Henderson (Oddfellowship) . . .346 
Frank H. Breyfogie (Knight Templar 

and 32-degree Mason) '. .346 

W. S. Bandy (Masonry, etc.) 346 

Secretary W. B. Stoddard's Reports.. 17, 57, 
93, 118, 152, 183, 209, 253, 281, 307, 342, 378 

Secret Societies Ancient 363 

Squirming in Atlanta .246 

Swartz, Fraternal Delegate to Free Meth- 
odist General Conference . . .' 92 

Tennessee Law — President Blanchard's 

Letter 296 

Testimonies of Evangelists 223 

Rev. R. A. Torrey 

Rev. George C. Xeedham 

Dwight L. Moody 

Rev. B. Carradine 

Dr. George F. Pentecost 
Testimonies, Miscellaneous 273 

Mrs. A. J. Gordon 

Alexander Campbell 

Frances E. Willard 

Joseph Cook 

Judge Pliuy Merrick 

Rev. J. P. Lytle, D. D. 

E. Ronayue 
Testimonies of Seceders — 

See "Seceders' Testimonies" 

Testimony at Camp Meetings 152 

Testimony of Wendell Phillips 

December cover 

The Goat 380 

The Lodge 318 

The Preaching Required by the Times.. . 41 
Think Not That God Deserts the Field 

( Poetry ) May cover 

Two Experiences with Lodgemen 183 

Typical Lodge Order 200 

Unique Fourth of July Celebration. ..... .130 

Universalist Church and Masonry 324 

Virtues and the Lodge 115 

Washington, George — February Twenty- 
Second 321 

Webster, Daniel 259 

"What Ails American Shipping?" 267 

When the Preacher Came to Town 

(Poetry) 354 

Where Shall I Send My Boy to College? 98 



Why Lodges Flourish *28- 

Wise Teacher 348- 

Zeal of Workers of Evil .299- 



MR. BRYAN IS INITIATED. 

Lincoln, Neb., March n. — Inaugurat- 
ing a series of annual addresses in na- 
tional universities on universal arbitra- 
tion, William J. Bryan spoke Tuesday 
morning to i,8oo students of the State 
university on "Arbitration Versus 
Peace." ' 

Mr. Bryan joined the ranks of college- 
Masons after the lecture. He was ini- 
tiated as a member of Daleth chapter of 
Acacia at the university chapter house. 
Prominent university faculty members as- 
sisted in the initiation. 



BLACK HAND DOOMS VOLINI. 

Dr. C. Volini, president of the White- 
Hand Society, which was organized re- 
cently in Chicago to carry on a war" of 
extermination against the Black Hand — 
a band of criminal Italians — is "under 
sentence of death." 

The letter is translated as follows: 
"Dr. C. Volini, 382 South Halsted 
street: The supreme council of the Black: 
Hand has voted that you must die. You 
have net heeded our warnings in the past, 
but you must heed this. Your killing has 
been assigned and the man waits for you. 
He must do his duty. Prepare yourself 
for death. We will kill your body, but 
we do not want to kill your soul." 



O religion ! what doctrines are taught 

in thy name ! 



THE HATCHET 

A Monthly Magazine 

Strikes at all Evil. It is 
fig-hting- the Liquor Traf- 
fic, Tobacco and Impurity 

Department Exposing - Masonry, one 
devoted to the Home, one to Health, etc. 

EDIT D AND PUBLISHED BY 

CARRY A. NATION 

50 cents A Year, 3 Months' Trial 10c 

Fend for sample. Agents wanted. 
Address: 217 D St., IM. W., Washington, D. C. 



May, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



31 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING T ODGES 

FOR SALE BY 

The National Christian Association 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION - HOW TO ORDER 

The safest as well as the cheapest ways to get hooks are as follows: 

Always remit the full amount for your order by Bank Draft on CHICAGO or NEW YORK, 
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Please do not send personal checks; if sent, add 10 cents for exchange. 

^Vrite your name md post-office address PLAINLY and IN FULL, giving street address, post-office 
box number, or number of R. F. D. route and box number. If order is to be sent by express, name your 
express office (if different from post office \ and the express company by which to ship. 

Books at retail prices are ALWAYS SENT CARRIAGE PAID, usually by mail unless package is 
too heavy, in which case we ship by prepaid express. If order is large, be sure to give name of express 
office and express company. 

Small orders will be sent by REGISTERED MAIL or PREPAID EXPRESS if 8 cents extra is 
Temitted with order, and delivery of books, in good order, is then guaranteed. 

CO. D. Orders will not be filled unless $1.00 is sen 1 *- -with order as a guaranty that books -will be 
taken (no books shipped on approval^; collection charges must be paid by customer. 

State BINDING and PRICE of EACH book ordered. 

TERMS: CASH WITH ORDER. We do not open accounts with individuals. Special discount 
to pastors of churches. 



ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of ~"7-lly Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
Institution and a critical analysis of the chfiacter 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchfa-d, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest,, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and tbe proper manner of 
conducting tbe business of the Lodge. Tbe 
"secret work" is given in full, including tbe oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
^hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
curacy of this work bas been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 



OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each 
degree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual 
corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the Soy^lsm Grand Lodge. Cloth, 
$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIx 

UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by tbe Supreme Lodsre of the World, with 
the secret'work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 
ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men. comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree. Chief's 
Degree : with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 cents; 
paper, 35 cents. 



32 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



May, 1908; 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages, in cloth, $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The. first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and - ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. G39, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
gravings. The oaths, obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
cloth, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
three Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Qberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 

INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate them. 
5 cents. 

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages ; 5 cents. 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. H. EL Hinman, showing 
Masonic assault on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech : interference with justice in 
courts, etc. 20 cents. 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekab 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
I. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work, 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
tuting Rebekah Lodges, and Installation of Officers, 
of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 



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47-55 Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 



CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Historical Sketch ; How the Business is Man- 
aged ; Publications ; Its Work and Its Workers ; 
Co-operating Organizations ; What Is Accom- 
plished. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
package of 25 for 25 cents. 

EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
cents a copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

WHY I LEFT THE MASONS, 

By Col. George R. Clarke. A Thirty-two De- 
gree Mason, an officer of the Civil War, founder 
of "Pacific Garden Mission," Chicago, and a Chris- 
tian Worker of national reputation. 11 pages; 
postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 25 
for 25 cents. 

GRACIOUSLY DELIVERED 

Trom Seven Secret Societies. By Rev. E. G. 
Wellesley-Wesley. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a 
copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

Rev. M. L. Haney, a minister and evangelist 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a seced- 
ing Mason, tells his experience and states his 
objections to the Lodge. A Christian Lodge Im- 
possible. Is the Lodge a Help or a Hindrance 
to Salvation ? 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. 
A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

BAPTIf T TESTIMONIES. 

Fro l Rev. P. S. Henson, D. D., Rev. A. J. 
Gordon, D. D., Rev. Nathaniel Colver, D. D., and 
others. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
package of 25 for 25 cents. 

ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE. 

Secret Societies in Relation to the Home. 
By Rev. A. C. Dixon, D. D., pastor of Chicago 
Avenue (Moody) Church, Chicago. 3 pages ; post- 
paid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 
25 cents. 

CHURCH AND LODGE. 

An Address Delivered at Mr. Moody's "Con- 
ference for Christian Workers," at Northfield, 
Mass., by President Charles A. Blanchard, D. D. 
15 pages : postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. 

PERSONAL WORK: HOW TO SAVE CHRIS- 
TIANS FROM LODGES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
of Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois. Post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy. 

LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
Fatherhood of God," Discussed and Refuted. 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A package 
Of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
OFFERED TO SATAN. 

Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
nual Convention of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, May 15, 1902. 

The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
The Greatest Masons are Our Teachers. Is Free- 
masonry a Religion? Is the Masonic Religion Chris- 
tian? What Kind of Religion is It? Marks of 
Demon Worship. Our Duty. 24 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy, or $1.00 per hundred. 



ODDFELLOWSHIP A RELIGIOUS INSTI- 
TUTION 

And Rival of the Christian Church. 8 pages ; 
postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a package of 25 for 
25 cents. 

WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull. 6 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 25 for 25 
cents. 

CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddf ellowship ? Ought Christians to 
Perform Acts of Beneficence and Charity as Odd- 
fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
man. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. 

WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

By Rev. J. Blanchard. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents; a package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE "GOOD MAN ••■ ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Ofher Man's Conscience — 
Which Should We Follow? 4 pages; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE STRANGE CASE OF MR. GOODMAN. 

"Why Are There So Many Good Men in 
Secret Societies?" The Question Answered. 13 
pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 
25 for 25 cents. 

ARE INSURANCF LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra- 
tion. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

OUGHT CHRISTIANS TO HOLD MEMBER- 
SHIP IN MODERN WOODMEN OF 
AMERICA? 

Extracts from History* and Official Ritual 
of the order, showing its relation to Christianity. 
4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate in Them? 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
Penalties; Are Masonic Penalties Ever Enforced? 
Masonic Arrogance ; Masonic Despotism ; Grand 
Lodge Powers ; Disloyalty to Country ; Our Re- 
sponsibility as Christians; What Can Be Done? 
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FOES OF THE CHRISTIAN SABBATH. 

A word on the common desecration of the 
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fanation. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. 
A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

A package containing one of each 
of the above tracts will be sent, 
postpaid, for 25 cents. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. Madison Street, CHICAGO, ILL 



a The 

American 

Magazine 

When John S. Phillips and his associates took charge of The 
American Magazine they made the following announcement: 

"We live by visions. .We have a vision of a magazine ; we conceive that in it no great thing 
of human interest would go unrecorded ; that in it would he something of the best of all : — literature 
that in story and poetry refreshed the emotions and the love of life ; art that stirred anew the 
faculty of seeing beauty and truth in the world about ; counsel and judgment and light upon men 
and public events that concern us all ; new knowledge of man's achievements in the wide range of 
his devices and discoveries ; and all set forth with such zest, such knowledge, such art of expression, 
that there would be no dull line and no indifferent picture — that some glow of truth or humor or 
sentiment would play on every page, and that you would rise from reading with the mind enlivened 
and the heart refreshed and a confirmed belief that it was worth while living in this world, and 
worth while living to make it better. 

'If there be no vision the people perish.' " 

You can get an idea of how closely the editors are following their ideal by reading this incom- 
plete list of writers and subjects in coming numbers of the Magazine : 



DAVID GRAYSON 

has laid a mantle of peace over a big part of 
this country through the freshest literary prod- 
uct of the year — -"Adventures in Contentment." 
Now comes "The Open Road" — a new series, just 
as wholesome and human and sweet as its prede- 
cessor. 

WILLIAM J. LOCKE 

the famous English author of "The Vagabond" 
and "The Morals of Marcus," will contribute his 
next novel, "Simple Septimus," to The American 
Magazine, beginning with the May number. It 
is a rare story of a gun inventor and a beauti- 
ful English country girl. The fascinating cor- 
ners of Europe form the background ; and the 
illustrations are by James Montgomery Flagg. 

IDA M. TARBELL n 

is at work on several subjects of national import- 
ance which cannot at present be announced but 
which will appear exclusively in The American 
Magazine. 

WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE 

the famous Kansas editor, will have an inimita- 
ble character study of Taft in the May number. 
Announcement will be made- later of a very im- 
portant work which Mr. White is doing for early 
issues of The American Magazine. 

PROFESSOR WILLIAM JAMES 

whose article "The Powers of Men" in a recent 
issue of The American Magazine was the maga- 
zine feature of the year, is at work on another 
and still more interesting paper for us. 



RAY STANDARD BAKER'S 

new series, "The Color Line in the North," pre- 
sents the tragedy of the Northern Negro, the 
great unrecognized problem at our door. 

JULIAN STREET 

whose stories "The Englishman" and "The Some- 
thing of Somebody" have given much delight to 
readers of The American Magazine will contrib- 
ute more of his work to early issues. 
Other writers of short stories for The American 
Magazine are : Ellis Parker Butler, May Sin- 
clair, Venita 'Seibert, Mary Stewart Cutting, Jo- 
seph C. Lincoln and Octavia Roberts. 

MR DOOLEY 

F. P. Dunne, creator of "Mr. Dooley," writes ex- 
clusively for The American Magazine. There is 
a ""Dooley" article every month illustrated by 
John T. McCutcheon, the famous cartoonist. 

O. HENRY 

has come to his own in recognition. There is a 
wide sense of the fact that he is one of those 
rare artists — a great short story writer. We 
shall publish six of his stories in 1908. 

JOSEPHINE DASKAM BACON 

has written a fantastical, farcical sixty horse- 
power automobile story called "An Idyll of All 
Fool's Day," in which the wit and the rollick- 
ing humor of this writer show at their brightest. 
It appears in the April, May and June issues. 




The American Magazine is $i.oo by 
the year or ioc a copy on all news- 
stands. Send subscription orders to the 

Phillips Publishing Company, 341 Fifth Avenue 

New York City 




Annual Meeting 



Convention 




CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $1.00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, an"d to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicago, III., under Act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Impressions of Annual Convention 33 

Patriotic Order, Sons of America 34 

Mystic Workers of the World 7 34 

National Protective Legion 34 

Heptasophs 34 

The Grange .'■ 34 

The National Anniversary 35 

Juvenile Lodges^ — The Recruiting Cen- 
ters for Higher Secret Orders. By 

Mrs. Frances C. Blanchard 35 

The Result of Obedience, or Walking 

with God. By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull. 38 
JSeceders" Conference — Mr. E. Y. Wool- 
ley, Mr. W. H. Boles, Mrs. J. W. 

Stevens, Mr. R. R. Dunlap . . 42 

"Extracts from Letters Read at the An- 
nual Meeting 46 

Annual Meeting Minutes 52 

■Secretary W. B. Stoddard's Annual Re- 
port 54 

Treasurer's Annual Report 5G 

My Reasons for Leaving the Lodge 49 

A Seceder's Testimony . . . 49 

Masonic Oaths in Court Records . 49 

A Scriptural Study of Secret Societies ... 50 

Secrecy Our Great Evil 55 

Italian Masons in Massachusetts 55 

Masonic and Black Hand Oaths ........ .*56 

News of Our Work 57 

Michigan Agent's Report 57 

. Agent F. J. Davidson's Report 58 

W. B. Stoddard's Letter 59 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter — Names of Se- 

ceders 60 

What Think Ye?— Catholic Priest Halts 

Funeral Procession 62 

It Is Not Perjury to Divulge Secret Work 

of Lodges 62 

Secret Societies Organize to Help the 
Needy 62 



INDIANA STATE OFFICERS, 
1907=1908. 

President — Rev. L. G. Bears, 412 W. 
13th street, Peru. 

Vice Presidents — Rev. C. A. Mum- 
mart, Huntington ; Rev. L. H. Ebey, ; 
and Rev. D. Y. Schultz, Bible Training 
School, Fort Wayne. 

Secretary — Rev. H. C. Ingersoll, 13 18 
E. Creighton avenue, Fort Wayne. 



NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY STATE 
OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. F. M. Foster, 345 W. 
29th St., New York City. 

First Vice President — Rev. D. Vander 
Ploeg, 47 Hope Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Second Vice President — Rev. K. F. 
Ohlson, 140 East 50th St., New York 
City. 

Third Vice President — Rev. H. Blews, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Secretary — Rev. G. Westenberg, 129 
4th Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

Treasurer — Rev. James Parker, 341 
Webster Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



IOWA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. J. S. McGaw, Morn- 
ing Sun, R. F. D. 

First Vice-President — Rev. H. P. 
Gray, Auburn. 

Second Vice-President — Rev. V. S. 
Jensen, Brayton, R. F. D. 1. 

Secretary — Rev. T. J. Adrian, 723 
Penn. Ave., Des Moines. 

Treasurer — Abner Branson, New 
Sharon. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. A. D. Zahnizer, of 
Blairsville. 

First Vice President — I. N. H. 
Beahm, of Elizabethtown College. 

Second Vice President — Rev. J. S. 
Martin, of New Castle. 

Secretary — Rev. O. G. Schoenlein, of 
Castle Shannon. 

Treasurer — H. C. Cassel, 2305 Ger- 
mantdwn avenue, Philadelphia. 





"Jesns answered him, — I spake openly to the world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, JUNE, 1908. 



NUMBER 2 



IMPRESSIONS OF ANNUAL CONVEN= 

TION. 

"This was the most influential Conven- 
tion of our Association that I have at- 
tended in twenty years." — Ezra A. Cook. 



It is my impression that the Confer- 
ence just concluded in Chicago was one 
of the strongest and best ever held by 
the National Christian Association. The 
session given to the ladies, the session 
filled with testimonies of seceders, and 
the address of Dr. Dixon, would any one 
of them have made a meeting memora- 
ble. 1 was also deeply impressed by the 
address of Mr. Boles, who was a new 
voice to me and a voice of power. I feel 
that to Brother Hitchcock and Brother 
Phillips we owe a great debt of grati- 
tude for the untiring- labors that made 
the meeting so helpful. It will appear in 
eternity as one of the forces chosen of 
God to accomplish great things for our 
country and the Kingdom of God. — C. 
A. Blanchard. 



The two days' Annual Convention just 
closed was without fuss or fustian, 
feathers or friction. It had been much 
prayed for, well planned and faithfully 
executed. The attendance was good. The 
morning sessions were devoted to the 
transaction of business, while the after- 
noon and evening sessions were given to 
the discussion of such problems as nat- 
urally emanate from secret combinations. 
From start to finish, from the invocation 
at the first session to the benediction at 
the last gathering, the spirit was excel- 
lent. During the two days' run there 
was not a "hot box." Upon some sub- 
jects there was slight difference of opin- 
ion, but no acrimonious debate. It was 
a rare assemblage of men and women 
with well-defined, intelligent convictions, 



without a mere sentimentalist or a fa- 
natic among them. The papers, address- 
es and testimonies of seceders and others 
in the afternoons were clear, well-poised 
and convincing, while the evening ad- 
dresses by Mr. Boles, President Blanch- 
ard and Dr. Dixon were exceptionally 
strong and clear-cut. We had thought 
at first to limit the Convention to one 
day, but the two days proved quite too 
short. Various expressions from the 
delegates about to return to their homes 
lead me to believe that the Convention 
was one of the most helpful and inspir- 
ing of any we have ever held. 

These are my views expressed while 
yet in the glow of the Convention, and I 
think a fuller report, as may be found 
in the June and following numbers of 
the Christian Cynosure, will verify" all 
that I have said. J. M. Hitchcock. 



God gave us ideal Convention weather. 
The weather bureau predicted rain, but 
God gave us clear skies. 

Michigan sent two delegates, Presi- 
dent Brink of Muskegon and State 
Agent Rev. G. A. Pegram ; and for good 
measure, they brought with them a third, 
Rev. D. H. Greene. 

At nine o'clock Thursday morning 
there were fifty present. These were 
from Illinois, Washington, D. C, Michi- 
gan, Ohio, Indiana, Iowa, and Wiscon- 
sin. The denominations represented 
were : Methodist Episcopal,. Free Metho- 
dist, Baptist, Gospel Workers, United 
Presbyterian, Reformed Presbyterian, 
Congregational. Christian Reformed, 
Lutheran, Christian, United Brethren 
(Radical), and German Baptist. 

It was good to see Rev. G. A. Pegram 
and Rev. W. B. Stoddard. They were 
the reserve force, ready for any call : 
they were the minute men responding in- 



34 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



stantly in any emergency. Under the 
circumstances not much was asked of 
them, but their presence was none the 
less important and appreciated. 

About two hundred and fifty consti- 
tuted the afternoon audiences, and about 
eight hundred were present in the even- 
ings. The new voices awakened the 
greatest interest, but one who has heard 
President Blanchard many times said: 
"I never knew him to speak with more 
power." It was worth a convention just 
to discover such a man as Rev. John A. 
Earl, D. D., pastor Belden Avenue Bap- 
tist church, Chicago, who led the devo- 
tional services on Thursday evening. His 
testimony was like a bugle blast, clear, 
forceful and heartening. 

The weather, the audiences, the speak- 
ers, the results in converting some, in 
quickening the zeal of others, in formu- 
lating some new plans, made this a Con- 
vention that will long be "a waymark 10 
the sons of time." — W. I. Phillips. 



PATRIOTIC ORDER SONS OF 
AMERICA. 

The Order was first founded in Phila- 
delphia, in 1847, an d nas three degrees. 
Males of good character, and over six- 
teen years of age, were eligible for the 
first degree. The object of the Order 
seems to be, '"America for native-born 
Americans ;" that is, for all those who 
are born in America. 



MYSTIC WORKERS OF THE WORLD. 

The order was founded at Fulton, 111., 
in 1892. It pays death and disability 
benefits by means of mutual assessments, 
and takes into membership men and wo- 
men over sixteen years of age, who pass 
the physical examination. Those unable 
to pass the physical examination may, 
by election, become social members. 

"The founder of the 'Mystic Work- 
ers,' G. W. Clendenen, was a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, of the Knights 
of Pythias, Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, Knights of the Maccabees and Wood- 
men of the World," from which it may 
be inferred that the order is a legitimate 
offspring of Freemasonry. 

"Its emblems include two columns, 6r 
pillars, surmounted by two globes, and 



between them an open Bible with scales 
of justice and plane and square. The 
ritual emphasizes charity, as described in 
I. Corinthians xiii." 



NATIONAL PROTECTIVE LEGION. 

The National Protective Legion is a 
fraternal, beneficiary, secret society, or- 
ganized under the laws of New York 
State, by members of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, to unite all acceptable men and 
women in one association. It has a pass- 
word, and grips, and signs, for the pro- 
tection of itself from those not associ- 
ated with it. It has insurance features, 
and its headquarters are at Waverly, 
N. Y. 



HEPTASOPHS. 

The order is religiously founded on 
the doctrine of the "Universal Father- 
hood of God and Brotherhood of Men." 
They admit Jews, Christians, and ail 
others who will profess a faith or "be- 
lief in a Supreme Being." The motto 
of the order is, "In God we trust." 

The Improved Order of Heptasophs 
is composed of members who seceded 
from the old order of Heptasophs, and 
the Improved Order gives greater prom- 
inence to insurance matters, we under- 
stand. It has an organ called the "I. O. 
H. Advocate," published at Baltimore. 



THE GRANGE. 

The National Grange was founded 
December 4th, 1867, by O. H. Kelley, a 
Freemason, its instigator ; and he was 
assisted by Rev. A. B. Grosh, an Odd- 
fellow, in conjunction with other Ma- 
sons and Oddfellows. It had its origin 
in Washington, D. C, among Govern- 
ment employes, and was to be an order 
exclusively for "representatives of the 
agricultural population." 

The ritual is said to be of an elabor- 
ate and impressive character. Four de- 
grees are conferred in the subordinate 
Granges. State Granges confer a fifth, 
and also a sixth degree. A seventh de- 
gree is conferred by the National 
Grange. This seventh degree "has 
charge of the secret work of the order." 



Elegance of character is more to be 
sought than elegance of dress. 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



35 



The National Anniversary 

Thursday and Friday, May 21st and 22d, 1908. 




MRS. BLANCHARU. 



THURSDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

JUVENILE LODGES. 

The Recruiting Centers for Higher Secret 

Orders. 

BY MRS. FRANCES C. BLANCHARD, WHEA" 
TON, ILLINOIS. 

It is the foxes, the little foxes, that 
spoil the vines. The gardener can fight 
the well-known enemies in the open ; but 

these little animals 
are so sly, and 
hide so easily un- 
der the branches 
and green leaves, 
and work so se- 
cretly, that the 
vines are despoil- 
ed ere he is aware. 
It is the early 
influences, the ear- 
ly training, that 
directs the later 
life. If there is a 
radical change in 
a person's life, 
after maturity, it comes as an upheaval, 
a cataclasm. Drunkards are reformed, 
men are reclaimed from lives of vice, 
and many leave the lodges, but these are 
the exception rather than the rule. 

Train into right living rather than 
saving your energies for rescue work, 
and you save the next generation. 

It costs something to bring up chil- 
dren right, but it is worth while. Satan 
has no need of paid teachers, or an en- 
dowment, to carry on his work. There 
are multitudes willing and anxious to do 
his bidding. They just stand 'round on 
corners waiting for some one to give 
them the tip — a new plan, more taking, 
more attractive, than the last, to catch 
the unwary. And they do make big 
catches. 

Means can be taken, and 'must, to pre- 
vent the wholesale education of our chil- 
dren preparatory to membership in the 
higher secret orders. These beginning 
societies have become the great feeding 
springs of lodgism. Dry them up and 



its power will be much weakened, if not 
altogether broken. 

Think of the Lodge as a great pagan- 
producing engine, right here in Christian 
America! Its annual capacity for turn- 
ing out the finished product is unlimited 
and its appetite ever unsatisfied. What 
is to be done, you ask? When the church, 
the business world, the public school, the 
college, and the university, all join in 
helping on this soul-destroying business, 
what can one do? Each has thrown its 
peculiar garb over the director of its 
special culture school, and given its un- 
qualified sanction to whatever the direc- 
tor may do in the way of preparation. 
Knights of King Arthur. 

The "Order of the Knights of King- 
Arthur" exists under the patronage of 
the church — at least some branches of it. 
Directions for forming a "castle," as the 
local society is called, recommend that 
the boys in the Junior Endeavor Society 
or Epworth League are just the sort of 
boys wanted. Those about the age of 
fourteen, from the same neighborhood, 
and of the same social conditions. They 
are at the age when the "gang" idea is 
growing ; when the visions of parade, re- 
galia, and initiation are most fascinating. 
The Round Table, the organ of this so- 
ciety, goes on to say, that when King Ar- 
thur passed away, according to the An- 
glo-Saxon legend, he promised to return 
to earth again. In this society they learn 
to emulate him in all knightly deeds and 
living. "He so touches their lives that 
his spirit is reincarnated in them." 

There are three degrees to be taken — 
those of Page, Esquire, and Knight. The 
initiations are intended to be devotional 
and worshipful, yet to have enough of 
mysticism to keep the interest and fasci- 
nation of the members and candidates up 
to the highest pitch, still without trans- 
gressing the laws of good breeding and 
decorum. 

After initiation each boy is given 
a "new name" — usually that of 
some ancient and worthy knight. In the 



36 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



first degree, the boy seeking adventure is 
met by some villains in a wood, and is 
in danger of being killed, when some 
knights of Arthur rescue him by hard 
fighting, and take him to the king, to 
whom he vows loyalty and service. 

In the second degree he is tested as to 
his manly virtues. He is "to draw the 
sword Excalibur, embedded in the stone 
of testing." Whenever he fails he is 
jeered, because found unworthy. Final- 
ly it yields to him, when he has overcome 
by putting away uncleanness. Then he 
takes the triple pledge of purity, temper- 
ance and reverance. 

The first stage of the initiation of the 
third degree is devotional, as this is to 
follow confirmation or uniting with the 
church. The second stage is symbolical. 
He is supposed to have fasted and wit- 
nessed a good confession. In the dim 
light he is shown the cross, and taught 
its significance. He is shown, successive- 
ly, a book, a heart, and then he catches a 
glimpse of the Holy Grail. 

The knighting occurs in the third 
stage, after a hymn has been sung — "The 
Son of God Goes Forth to War," or 
"Along the Weary, Dusty Way, the Suf- 
fering Savior Went." 

The motto of the order is, "My Sword 
Shall Be Bathed in Heaven." The privi- 
leges to be won are the Siege Perilous 
and rank in the peerage, such as Baro- 
net, Viscount, Earl, Duke, Prince, and 
so forth. 

Coming Men of America. 

"The Coming Men of America" is a 
society for boys, from twelve years old 
and up, whose motto is, "Our Turn 
Next." They expect to step into the 
good places vacated by their fathers and 
elders. The organizers, meanwhile, hope 
to make a good living by it. Boys may 
become members of the grand lodge by 
subscribing for the Star, the organ of the 
order, getting the ritual, and taking the 
vow of secrecy. When six or more mem- 
bers of the grand lodge are in a com- 
munity, a local lodge may be formed. Or 
the local lodge may be first formed by 
the grand secretary. Beside the ritual, 
signs and password, they have a cipher 
code called "Bestography." The mem- 
bers can communicate with each other, 



using the cipher code, but they must 
never use it when writing to the grand 
secretary, as he is too busy. 

Members are urged to enlist other 
boys in the order, and so swell its ranks. 
They are assured that there is nothing in 
the C. M. A. that conflicts with their so- 
cial, religious or political rights. No 
moral standard is required for member- 
ship. The character of the meetings is 
much the same as that found in higher 
lodges. After the initiatory part is over, 
the evening is given up to smoking, 
drinking, and telling of vile stories. 
There are certain instructions as to gen- 
eral behavior, such as "not to be cross to 
their younger brothers or sisters ;" "To 
remember, as we are, so is the world to 
us: The most familiar objects change 
their aspect with every change of soul." 

The badge is a "star," the "bright and 
guiding star." The circle around it sig- 
nifies that the members are bound to- 
gether by a chord of sympathy and love 
that can never be broken. The "F" in the 
center means fidelity, friendship, while 
the three colors, white, blue, and red, sig- 
nify purity, truth and love. 

The "Coming Men of America" num- 
bered more than a million two years ago. 
One would naturally expect them to be 
boys who are left to drift on the streets 
after school or at night; whose parents, 
if they have any, are not anxious as to 
what they are doing. When their turn 
does come, what sort of men will they 
be? 

High School Fraternities. 

The fraternities and sororities of our 
high schools are the contributions the 
public makes, often of its brightest and 
best youths, to satisfy the demand of this 
present-day Moloch. The drop in morals 
and "grades" was so marked among the 
members of these fraternities, that a re- 
cent widespread movement among edu- 
cators and school boards has practically 
succeeded in debarring them from many 
schools. No member of a fraternity can 
enter in the athletic lists, nor in any con- 
test where prizes are to be won. It is 
to be hoped that soon they will be a thing 
of the past, and their disqualifying in- 
fluence will no longer mar the lives or 
futures of our young people. 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



3T 



We can prevent the actual attendance 
of pupils on these lodges, but we can no 
more efface the impress of them on their 
•characters than one can remove the in- 
jury done the tree by a hatchet in the 
hands of a reckless boy. 

Secret Societies in Colleges. 

Greek-letter societies are found in 
higher schools and colleges, with few ex- 
ceptions. That they are a source of 
great harm to the members while in 
school cannot be denied. They have no 
mother to watch over them ; and are not 
required to tell their parents, or in fact 
anyone, what goes on in them, unless so 
disposed. Many a young man is led into 
sin and vice while having his good time ; 
and comes out not only a candidate for 
a higher secret order, but a common 
drunkard ; a frequenter of the gambling 
den and brothel ; a possible inmate of one 
of our prisons or asylums. And this un- 
der the care of his Alma Mater! 

The Texas Freemason of March, this 
year, gives an account of a new move- 
ment among college men, which is very 
pleasing to them. While not a juvenile 
society, it comes under the head of "feed- 
er to the Masonic order." On May n, 
1905, there was organized in Ann Arbor, 
Michigan, an Acacia fraternity, which, 
according to Mr. M. Blodget, an attor- 
ney of Los Angeles, Cal., inaugurates a 
"movement that seems destined to have 
an important influence on the Masonry 
of the future, in this and probably other 
countries." There are now ten chapters. 
Wm. Homan, 33 , says, "Influence is as 
indestructible as matter. The influence 
emanating from the college Freemason — 
the Acacia fraternity man — cannot be 
measured." "The society is composed 
exclusively of Master Masons — of col- 
lege Masons. These young men live to- 
gether in one house, under one roof. 
They live, study and go to lodge togeth- 
er. The order is like the Greek-letter so- 
cieties — purely a college fraternity, with 
its chapter house and its social activities. 
But according to Masonic custom, it des- 
ignates its chapters by Hebrew letters. It 
also has an alternative designation for 
the term acacia, for it may use the three 
Hebrew letters Shin, Teth, and He, 



which spell the Hebrew word Shittah or 
Acacia." 

The article goes on to say, "The daily 
influence of the principles of Masonry, 
and of the more specific regulations and 
teachings of the Acacia, have a really 
tremendous influence in moulding the 
character of a man ; and while it is mak- 
ing a good man of him, it is also mak- 
ing of him an enthusiastic Mason, and 
an educated Mason. The Acacia is not 
merely a side order of Masonry. It is a 
child of Masonry. It is an inner circle 
— it is our young men, our young Ma- 
sons, gathered far from their home ties 
and home lodges, and bent on self-im- 
provement." 

The Los Angeles Freemason says, 
"Truly, indeed, knowledge is power; 
and unto whomsoever much is given, of 
him much is required. The great Ma- 
sonic fraternity has the right to expect 
much of the Acacia fraternity, and I 
venture to predict that in the years to 
come the grand officers in the grand 
bodies throughout the United States will 
be recruited from the ranks of the Aca- 
cia fraternity." 

Is there any preventative to this 
wholesale gathering in. of our youth into 
these paganizing societies? , 

Are you parents providing suitable 
work and recreation to keep your boys 
healthily employed outside of school 
hours? The child is what his parents 
make him, or force him to be by neglect. 

Are our churches doing what they 
ought to keep the children in touch with 
them and Christian living? Has the 
church a right to refuse membership to 
any child who seeks it? "Except ye be- 
come as little children, ye cannot enter 
in." Many a child, turned away -by n 
church, has never again sought admis- 
sion. 

Our public school system surely has a 
higher purpose than putting an educa- 
tional veneer on young timber already 
suffering from dry rot. Education with- 
out good morals is not good education. 

Has Alma Mater become a misnomer? 
A shrug of the shoulders or a wise look 
does not settle the matter. 

These are vital questions, and must 



38 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



be answered sooner or later: — if not 
here, then surely before a higher tri- 
bunal. 

If you have not watched over your 
brother to save him from the snares and 
pitfalls of life, then his blood will cry 
out from the very ground itself. It will 
be avenged by the One Whose sword is 
rightfully bathed in Heaven. 



Nebuchadnezzar believed that the gods 
spoke through dreams. God, adapting 
His method to Nebuchadnezzar's man- 



THE RESULT OF OBEDIENCE, 
WALKING WITH GOD. 



OR 



BY MRS. ELIZABETH M. RULL, STAR 
PRAIRIE, WIS. 

The greatest fundamental principle of 
our lives ought to be, What would God 
have me do? or, in other words, every 
earnest Christian wants to know the will 
of God in every detail of life. Jesus 
says, "If any man will do His will, he 
shall know of the doctrine, whether it 
be of God, or whether I speak of my- 
self." Oh, I like that word know ! that 
we may perceive with certainty if we do 
His will. "Be ye not unwise, but under- 
standing what the will of the Lord is." 
Our knowledge of God's will is in ex- 
act proportion to our willingness to do 
His will. "If thine eye be .single, thy 
while body shall be full of light." Sin- 
gleness of purpose is one great secret 
of spiritual, prosperity. We are so apt 
to twist the strands of natural inclina- 
tion and divine obligation and to call 
the cord God's will. By such manipula- 
tion, the judgment becomes warped- and 
twisted. 

Conversing with a minister upon the 
lodge evil, he said, "None of us think 
the same, we are of different minds." 
But Paul said to the Corinthians that 
they should be "perfectly joined to- 
gether in the same mind and in the same 
judgment." I believe it to be possible, 
but only through Christ. 

In order that we may have the mind 
of Christ, He appeals to us in every pos- 
sible way, to attract our attention, to ar- 
rest our thoughts from channels that 
are not conducive to spiritual growth. 
His experiences with us are as varied as 
our faces. 

The Chaldeans sought everything by 
searching the stars. He uses the star of 
Bethlehem to lead them to Christ. 




MES. ELIZABETH M. HULL. 

ner, appeared to him in dreams. Now 
the Lord wanted to warn the Ninevites 
of their doom. How will God send a 
preacher that they will hear and heed? 
Now the Ninevites' chief divinity was 
the god Dagon, a creature part human 
and part fish. Remembering that God 
has always brought down his plan to 
man's plane, that He might save some, 
God would send His messenger from 
the sea. What method could be so ef- 
fective and appropriate? 

Now the people of Nineveh were the 
enemies of the Jews, and it seems that 
Jonah was afraid to preach to them. 
When he became willing to die for oth- 
ers, he became willing to preach to oth- 
ers. (Said a neighbor recently, "You 
don't think that Jonah and the whale 
story true, do you?" If it be incredible, 
then the story of the fiery furnace and 
the raising of Lazarus and other mir- 
acles are not credible.) "And the 
word of the Lord came unto Jonah the 
second time" — what mercy in those 
words, "the second time"! — and he went 
unto Nineveh and thev turned from 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



39 



their evil way. God makes no mis- 
takes. 

"Whatsoe'er He tells you, do it, 

Though you may not understand ; 
Yield to Him complete obedience, 

Then you'll see His mighty hand. 
Fill the water-pots with water — 

Fill them to the very brim. 
He will honor all your trusting; 

Leave the miracle to Him." 

As God is "the same yesterday, to- 
day and forever," it may not be amiss to 
show how He attracted the attention of 
the speaker from the last worldly thing 
she clung to — the secret society. When 
I entered the Rebekah and Eastern Star 
Lodges, I had no thought of its Tight- 
ness. I had never heard of an objection, 
and I followed in the steps of my 
minister and presiding elder, thinking 
very much like a cousin of mine (to use 
his words), "As there are so many min- 
isters in the lodges, I must think they 
are all right. Sometimes we get preju- 
diced on what we do not know." My 
humbly reply is, If God's word be true, 
I am wisely prejudiced. "For T am a 
true lodge-hater, and the friend o' God 
and man." 

Thank God, the educated have no 
monopoly of the truth, and the Holy 
Ghost is our supreme Teacher. His 
teaching on every subject, especially 
separation, is very comprehensive. We 
read in the Word, "When He, the Spirit 
of truth, is come, He will guide you into 
all truth." Again, the Holy Ghost is 
given by God to "them that obey Him." 
Many of the modern preachers are so 
well educated in theology that, as a 
preacher was once heard to declare, "W T e 
can hold an orthodox meeting without 
the Holy Ghost." 

I was converted at the age of twelve. 
I grew up to womanhood. Years pass- 
ed, and still I wore the same spiritual 
garment. Standing on the threshold of 
the first standard of Christianity, I had 
no yearning desire to step out on the 
second. One must indeed have looked 
strange to those who had worn many 
robes of righteousness. You know 
sometimes fields of grain get blighted. 
As in the material world, so in the spirit- 
ual world. It is those who are spiritu- 



ally blighted that are willing to become 
"true to the order." 

Thank God for the young preacher 
He sent to our place eleven years ago. 
His whole being seemed on fire for God. 
He talked against secret societies. It 
aroused the enemy, and the meetings 
had to be given up. He then had sev- 
eral cottage prayer-meetings. The 
Holy Spirit touched me in one of his 
talks about "praying without ceasing." 
I thought I would see if I could get into 
such an attitude as to be in the spirit of 
prayer. I tried for two days and failed. 
I didn't realize at the time that there 
was a fierce battle raging. The third 
day the enemy was overcome. Talk of 
happiness ! It surpassed anything I had 
ever realized! The following morning 
I was hardly awake before I asked my- 
self, "I wonder if I can be as happy to- 
day as yesterday?" The answer came 
at once, "I can do all things through 
Christ which strengtheneth me." Again 
I asked myself, "I wonder if I can be so 
peaceful as yesterday?" and the message 
came, "I will give him perfect peace 
whose mind is stayed on Me." I knew 
the message came from the throne (not 
the last I have heard, praise the Lord), 
for I was too ignorant of the Bible to 
adapt them, and moreover, I did not 
know if the last message was in the 
Bible. Upon searching I found it, 
though it had come to me in the first per- 
son. Glory to God, He had shown Him- 
self in a new light to me ! 

The young minister stayed in the 
vicinity several weeks. Several times 
he took me to task about the secret so- 
ciety. I could not see why I should give 
up the lodge. The shot and the shell 
that he let fire from God's word didn't 
touch me. But upon his suggestion, I 
told him, "I have already left it with 
God to show me." (I can safely say I 
didn't bore the Lford to show me.) My 
eyes had filled with tears while re- 
flecting upon the thought of giving up 
my lodges, and T summed it all up, "I 
guess it will never be." 

I kept on going to lodge about five 
months. The last time I acted as dep- 
uty and seated the officers-elect in their 
respective chairs, recited a poem, "What 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



Bridget Said in the Police Court," and 
had a royal time. The next week some 
revival meetings were started. My 
heart reached out to some boys who had 
manifested a desire to live for Christ. I 
asked several of them to call on me. 
They came and I found them very much 
in earnest. I said if they liked they 
might come again Saturday afternoon 
and bring their Bibles and all the boys 
that were of the same mind, thinking per- 
haps I could encourage or help them. 
They said they had work to do Satur- 
day ; how would Saturday evening do ? 
I hesitated, for it was my lodge night (I 
had no thought I had spent my last 
night in lodge). I finally thought, it 
will be only that night. So with reluct- 
ance I said, "All right, come in the even- 
ing." Now that the boys were coming, 
how was I to teach them of the Way, the 
Truth and the Life? I saw at once my 
deplorable ignorance of God's word; I 
saw my helplessness and my weakness ; 
and I thought of Him who had said, 
"Come unto Me, all ye that are weary." 
I took my Bible and picked out a lesson 
such as I thought would encourage 
them; when through with the lesson, the 
talk and the prayer, the boys were ask- 
ed if they would like to come again? 
They heartily assented. 

Viewing the nine boys, from eleven to 
fourteen years of age, seated around a 
table with their Bibles, with as much 
decorum as if in church; and when upon 
their knees, each one sending up his pe- 
tition to God, I felt I had God's approv- 
ing - smile. The meetings continued for 
six months, with every boy present as 
regularly as the week came around. 
When sickness in the family caused me 
to give them up, I felt I had had a bless- 
ed experience with my Heavenly Father. 

During the long term of sickness I 
studied my Bible with renewed vigor, 
and I obtained many links of evidence 
that a Christian should be free from 
all worldly entanglements, with not a 
margin left them to cater to the decept- 
ive secret society. If I followed after 
any human being, it must have been 
Jeremiah of old, for I ate the Word and 
wept for joy over the light that was 
streaming in upon my soul. "Be true to 



the principles of the order" had lost all 
its sweetness. A new song had been 
put in my mouth. Christ had filled 
every nook and crevice of my soul. I 
could say as did the Psalmist, "As the 
heart panteth after the water brooks, so 
panteth my soul after Thee, O God." 
Up to this time, as far as I knew, I 
was the only person in existence who 
had left the lodge for Christ. When 
one stands alone in a community against 
the masses, they feel that they need a 
good support; and I had found it. I 
never felt my weakness so that I thought 
of returning to what I had delighted in 
— the lodge. The more I studied the 
stronger I became ; and what was my 
joy, a year after T left the lodge, to 
learn of the Christian Cynosure. I 
wrote for a sample copy, and lo and be- 
hold, I found I was not the only person 
in existence who had become peculiar 
for Christ ! That was delightful to me ! 
The Lord has just such lovely surprises 
for those who will serve Him in spirit 
and in truth. I found that Moody, 
whose teachings I loved; President 
Blanchard, of Wheaton College ; ex- 
President Finney, of Oberlin College ; 
and others, men of thought and intelli- 
gence, men of God, who are searching 
out the deep things of life,- — that even I 
was right in harmony with them ; not 
through any wisdom of my own but 
through the wisdom of God in His 
Word. Surely God's Word was "a lamp 
unto my feet and a light unto my path." 
God, who breathed into man the breath 
of life and man became a living soul, 
breathed into the Scriptures a life-giv- 
ing power. 

I find that very few Christians who 
are in the lodge care to know anything 
against it. As a writer puts it, "If ever 
the devil distinguished himself, it was 
when he designed, organized and sys- 
temized a power that shall forever hold 
its votaries in the bondage of darkness." 
Thank God, in Christ there is no dark- 
ness. 

Moody said, "To be a successful Christ- 
ian, you need to understand the wiles of 
the devil." The devil was a liar at the 
beginning. With that same deception he 
seeks to impress those who are on the 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



41 



broad road to destruction, that to go in 
the narrow road is to take away their 
pleasures, their happiness, their lawful 
gratifications. But blessed be the 
Father, He only takes away our foolish- 
ness, our weakness, and the qualities we 
ought to spare. 

Satan has counterfeited every good 
thing God has raised up for the spread 
of the Gospel and the salvation of man. 
God raised up true prophets : Satan op- 
posed them with false prophets. God 
sent His Son to redeem all mankind : 
the devil has raised up many anti-christs, 
and there is one yet to appear, "who op- 
poseth and exalteth himself above all 
that is called God, or that is worshiped." 
Christ founded the Church: Satan 
counterfeits the Church of Christ 
through the Lodge. Look at the count- 
less religions to draw men from the re- 
ligion of Jesus Christ ! With most of 
us, our lives started out with a deception 
— that of Santa Claus — a monstrous us- 
urpation of the Holy Child Jesus, which 
is a sacrilege and a falsehood, approved 
of in ninety-nine Sunday Schools out of 
every hundred throughout the land. 
Our childish imagination was aroused to 
the fullest extent with stories of a funny, 
jolly old man, with a snowy beard, rid- 
ing to the tops of houses and climbing 
down chimneys to give presents to good 
little boys and girls ; a deception of the 
enemy, that the child's mind may not 
dwell on the story of the Christ-child, 
but upon trie god of pleasure. Ask the 
child, on Christmas day, in whose honor 
the day is celebrated, and will he not 
answer, "Santa Claus"? Let us look 
to it that the god of pleasure does not 
appease the cravings of our immortal 
soul which God has made in such a way 
that it cannot be satisfied with anything 
short of Himself. 

What has been the result of my break- 
ing the yoke of bondage with unbeliev- 
ers? Had I not been obedient, I cannot 
depict the unutterable loss to my soul. 
One writer says: "He that stands with 
one foot on a rock and the other foot on 
a quicksand will sink as surely as he that 
hath both feet on quicksand." The 
stake is indescribably tremendous, for it 
involves my eternal destiny. He says 



He will be a "Father" if I make the 
separation. I was obedient. His prom- 
ise has truly been verified, yea, a hun- 
dredfold. He has filled every longing 
and need of my being. He is my Coun- 
selor, my Guide, my Teacher, my Helper, 
my Friend, my Physician, my all in all. 
Moody, that Spirit-filled man, had it 
right when he said, "If you want power 
with God, come out from the secret so- 
ciety." 

How can I do otherwise than 
Count all loss but gain, 
Such a friend to obtain. 

Think, will you, of Christ's right of 
demand when He comes to one_ with a 
command like this, "Be ye not unequally 
yoked together with unbelievers." 
Obedience will revolutionize the whole 
experience of one's life, if it be re- 
sponded to rightly. It will result in an 
entirely new life — a life having renew- 
ed force, new vigor. "I will be a Father 
unto you, and ye shall be My sons and 
daughters, saith the Lord Almighty." 
The promise is, He will be something 
more than prior to the separation — a 
new power. Christ demands but a rea- 
sonable service. Blessings come 
through obedience. If obedient, men 
may say, "You make a mistake," "You 
are narrow," "You do not catch the 
spirit of the age" ; but one of the great- 
est of men said : "If I yet pleased men I 
should not be the servant of Christ." If 
we are ridiculed, let us take no notice of 
it, but summon all our energy in the 
race for Christ. Laying aside all the 
weights that would hinder, let us "run 
with patience the race that is set before 
us." 

"Lead me, yea, lead me deeper into life, 
This suffering human life, wherein Thou 

liv'st 
And breathest still, and hold'st Thy way di- 
vine. 
'Tis here, O pitying Christ, where Thee I 

seek, 
Here where the strife is fiercest ; where the 

sun 
Beats down upon the highway thronged with 

men 
And in the raging- mart. Oh, deeper lead 
My soul into the living world of souls 
Where thou dost move. 



"But lead me, Christ divine, 



42 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



Where'er Thou will'st, only that I may find, 
At the long journey's end, Thy image there, 
And grow more like to it." 




FRIDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

SECEDERS' CONFERENCE 

Mr. E. Y. Woolley, assistant pastor 
Chicago Avenue church, spoke as fol- 
lows: 

My connection with secret societies 
commenced when I was a lad of perhaps 
ten years, when I was one of the charter 

members of a great 
organization which 
never had but one 
lodge, called the 
"Black Night 
Hawks of the 
Bloody Heart." My 
companions were a 
dozen other boys of 
about my own age. 
We arrayed our- 
selves with plumes 
and skulls and 
crossbones and oth- 
we had seen our 
we had our wood- 
our tin swords, our 
passwords, grips, signals of distress, 
and terrible oaths, just like grown 
men. We met in the loft of a 
barn, and went out and had fights 
with the street boys, whom we regarded 
as being beneath us because they were 
not in that great and magnificent secret 
society, and we expelled one unpopular 
member with^great gusto and energy, 
worthy of a better cause. 

My next experience in secret societies 
was in my college Greek-letter society. I 
thought that society contained the best 
fellows in the college ; and I am not sure, 
with a few exceptions, of which I am 
one, that that was not the truth, Not- 
withstanding, as I look back on that so- 
ciety, I can see now, what I did not see 
then, that the secret societies of my col- 
lege were undermining much of the real 
fellowship, based on character, and much 
of the true college spirit; and I believe 
it is the same to-day, as far as my ob- 
servation goes, in every college where 
they are a dominant factor. 



E. Y. WOOLLEY. 

er millinery, as 
fathers do ; and 
en spears and 



My next experience in secret societies- 
was when I became a business man and 
a church member. I was led into Ma- 
sonry by my friendship for one of the 
deacons of our church, who was a promi- 
nent and enthusiastic Mason. There 
were many things about the ritual that 
were repellant to me; and I never took 
a very great interest in the lodge, and the 
lodge system ; but I did enjoy the fellow- 
ship of many of the men. On the other 
hand, I felt ashamed of the companion- 
ship of many men in my lodge — and it 
was considered the best lodge in the city 
in which I lived — on account of Masons 
whose bad reputation was exceeded by 
their worse character. These men were 
admitted into the lodge without any ob- 
jection, because they had the name of be- 
ing "good fellows." 

Now at that time I was a Christian 
Endeavorer and a teacher in the Sunday 
school, and full of zeal in church work. 
I prided myself on being what I called a 
liberal Christian. I believed in going to> 
the theater, smoking, dancing, and play- 
ing cards, and I thought it was a very 
narrow and bigoted sort of religion 
which prohibited these things. But about 
this time I was by the providence of God 
convicted of sin, and then God in His- 
goodness broug'ht into my hands a print- 
ed address of Rev. F. B. Meyer, which 
led me to surrender myself to God whol- 
ly, so far as I knew ; to seek first His 
kingdom and His righteousness, and not 
to try any longer to serve God and mam- 
mon. That night, when I knelt before 
God and said, "O God, in the name of 
Christ I ask Thee to stamp upon my heart 
the words, 'Jesus only,' and on my life, 
and aims, and ideals, the thought of 
walking and living with Jesus only — 
that ni^ht the cards, the smoking, the 
dancing, and the theater-going all passed 
out of my life, thank God, forever. 

But my eyes were not yet enlightened 
in regard to the lodge. While I did not 
have any time, inclination, or desire to 
go, I did not see, what many Christian 
church-members do not see, that it was 
my duty to get out of the lodge. I did 
not see that my influence was standing 
for the lodge, and that the lodge was di- 
rectly against Christ and His church. ! 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



43 



did not see that at the time I went to 
Northfield, in 1897, and heard President 
Blanchard, for the first time, make a mas- 
terly address against secret societies. 

I think it was Charles Wesley who said 
the answer to three questions determined 
in his mind the success of any religious 
meeting. The three questions were 
these : First, Was any one saved ? sec- 
ond, Was any one sanctified? third, Did 
any one get mad? If these are the tests 
of a successful meeting*, certainly that, 
meeting at Northfield, when Dr. Blanch- 
ard spoke against secret societies, was a 
great success ; because I got very mad. 

I met a Knight Templar there, a min- 
ister. I reognized him by his charm, and 
I was a Knight Templar. He said, 
"What do you think about that speech?" 
I said, "I think it is an outrage." He 
said, "So do I. Let's go and tell Mr. 
Moody about it." We went, and we had 
a very brief and earnest argument with 
Mr. Moody. Mr. Moody held his ground 
and w r e held ours, and at the end we were 
both of the same opinion still. Mr. 
Moody took the position, then and there, 
that secret societies w~ere unchristian and 
evil, and ought to be denounced by Chris- 
tian people. I didn't believe it ; but the 
seed was sown in my heart, and the Holy 
Spirit was having a chance to work 
through the faithful testimony of your 
President, and He began to put questions 
in my mind, such as, "Are you following 
the will of God in remaining in the 
lodge?" 

Now, I did not want to get out of the 
lodge for two principal reasons. In the 
first place, I believed I would lose a great 
many friends of mine, who were lodge- 
members, if I got out. In the second 
place, I was a business man, selling to 
the factories throughout the country ma- 
chinery used in the handling of cotton; 
many of the treasurers, superintendents, 
managers and overseers of these cotton 
mills were Masons ; and I was afraid it 
would interfere with my business if I 
got out — that I would lose some of my 
best customers, who were enthusiastic 
Masons. 

But I did want to follow the will of 
God, and I prayed to God that if it was 
His will for me to get out of my secret 



societies He would make it very plain. I 
remember one night praying* to Him to 
give some marked sign by which I would 
know, without peradventure of making 
a mistake, that it was His will I should 
get out. 

I want to say, in passing, that these 
tw r o objections I had to getting out, were 
false objections. They never material- 
ized. They are false enough to have 
been given by the father of lies himself. 
I never lost a friend worth having — a 
friend who had backbone enough and a 
heart big enough to be worth having — 
by getting out of the lodge. And I never 
lost a customer, so far as I know, or a 
dollar's worth of business, by getting out 
of the lodge. Some of my best friends 
and customers were themselves very ar- 
dent Masons. I told them frankly just 
what my position was. Some said, "I 
respect you for it." Others said, "I wish 
I had the grace to go and do likewise." 

Now, after that night when I prayed 
to God to give me a sign if it was His 
will for me to get out, the next day I 
was on business in Boston. I took my 
lunch, and passed down towards my of- 
fice, past the Parker House, in front of 
the City Hall, to Water street, when, 
without knowing why I did it, I turned 
around, retraced my steps, and went up 
Tremont street, past Park street church, 
and there on the bulletin board I saw, 
"A Christian Conference Regarding Se- 
cret Societies ; Speakers, Rev. A. C. Dix- 
on, D. D. ; Rev. James M. Gray," and 
others whom I well knew. I looked at 
my watch and it was just the hour for 
the meeting to commence. I went in ; 
and what I heard at that meeting, and 
what I bought at the literature table and 
read myself, written by President Fin- 
ney, Joseph Cook, A. J. Gordon, and 
other men of God, convinced me, beyond 
a doubt, that men of God, led by the 
Spirit of God, did the Lord's will when 
they denounced and spoke out against 
secret societies. I took it that that was 
God's answer to my prayer, and that 
night I mailed withdrawals from every 
secret organization of which I was a 
member, including my college fraternity. 
I am ashamed to say that I was a Shrin- 
er, though not in good standing, because 



44 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



I must confess that the only meeting I 
had ever attended was the initiation ; and 
the coarse horse-play, buffoonery, revel- 
ry, debauchery, and drinking of that first 
meeting was too much for me. I never 
went back to the Shrine. 

In conclusion I want to say this: My 
boys' society, my college society, and the 
society of my manhood, all agreed, as I 
look back upon them, in bringing about 
three deleterious results. In the first 
place, they make class distinction, caste, 
social divisions, etc. In the second place, 
they limit the Lord's command, "Thou 
shalt love thy neighbor as thyself," to 
"Thou shalt love a lodge member as thy- 
self." In the third place, these lodges 
yoke one in the ties- of brotherhood to 
men of bad character, to unbelievers, and 
sometimes to criminals. A Christian man 
has no business to be tied up with such 
persons. The Spirit of God impressed 
this scripture upon my heart in those 
days when I was fighting that fight, and 
I believe no man can get around that one 
passage, inspired by God : "Be ye not un- 
equally yoked together with unbelievers : 
for what fellowship hath righteousness 
with unrighteousness? * * * Come out 
from among them, and be ye separate, 
saith tlie Lord" (II. Cor. 6: 14, 17). 

Mr. W. H. Boles, of Christopher, 111., 
spoke as follows: 

I went into the Freemasons and the 
Oddfellows when a very young minister 
in Marion, Illinois, the county-seat of 

Williamson Coun- 
ty. I was per- 
suaded by a good 
man, my father- 
in-law, a good 
friend of mine, 
who has been 
such for thirty- 
one years, and by 
an uncle of my 
wife, that i t 
would be a good 
thing for me to 
go into these 
lodges, that I 
might get hold of 
men and bring them to Christ. I did 
not know anything about the lodges, so I 
went in. I went in with pure motives; 




vv. H. BOLES. 



I was honest about it ; I saw good men 
in, and I went in with that idea of things. 
My experience was the same as that of 
a good many who have spoken here this 
afternoon. There were things which 
were revolting to me as I passed along. 
I took all the degrees of Oddfellowship, 
and all of the "ancient" degrees of Free- 
masonry. Old Father Hubbard and 
Hon. Roy Goddard, now president 
of the Fort Dearborn National Bank 
of Chicago, were the team that 
took me through most of the degrees of 
Ancient Freemasonry. When I went off 
to the university I did not have time, as 
a student, to attend these lodges. I took 
my demit from the Freemasons. I al- 
lowed my membership in the Oddfellows 
to drop, because at the time I was not 
able to pay my dues. I attended the 
Freemasons' lodge every once in a while, 
but I have not been in an Oddfellows' 
lodge for thirty years, from the day I 
was initiated to the present. 

I wish to state what caused me to leave 
the lodges. I was located in the city of 
Topeka, Kansas, as a missionary under 
our United States Board ; I had charge 
of the mission of our church in that city. 
My wife has always been opposed to se- 
cret societies, and when it was announced 
that Rev. J. P. Stoddard and Mr. S. E. 
Starry would speak on secret societies,, 
she said, "I want you to go to that meet- 
ing; they are going to expose Freema- 
sonry," and she told me she had got hold 
of a book that she had been thinking of 
showing me, for a long time, but,, said 
she, "I was a little afraid you would not 
like it." She said, "I can give you most 
of the signs and grips and bywords (she 
called them) ; and I want to see if I am 
right." I said, "We will -go;" and we 
went. The meeting was held in the State 
House, and a great congregation assem- 
bled, filling the room to its utmost ca- 
pacity. Mr. Stoddard exposed Freema- 
sonry, from the Entered Apprentice de- 
gree up to the Master's degree; and he 
and Mr. Starry "raised" a man from the 
dead level to the perpendicular, and went 
through with the whole thing. Mr. Stod- 
dard said, "I challenge any Mason in this 
audience to change a single jot or tittle, 
or line or word or syllable, of all these 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



45 



grips and signs and secret work as I have 
given them to-night." That was aston- 
ishing to me. Colonel Norris, proprietor 
of the Fifth Avenue Hotel, an old sol- 
dier, rather a wicked man and a drinking 
man — he was "half shot," as the expres- 
sion goes, that night — he was a 
Royal Arch Mason, and he and I had 
talked over Masonry quite a good deal 
together, just merely to be talking. He 
was in the audience, and he attacked 
those men and made a fiery speech. He 
said, "These men ought to be dragged 
out of this town." (Two or three men 
were rising up.) "We are the men who 
can do it." They began to gather, and 
there was trouble there. I could not 
stand that. It is not my nature to see 
men imposed upon. So I jumped upon a 
seat by the side of my wife, and I said, 
clapping my hands, "Let me have your 
attention a moment." I said, "Colonel 
Norris, I am surprised at you, an old 
soldier, that marched to the front of the 
battle, by the side of my father, in de- 
fense of human liberty and human right, 
and in defense of the Constitution — I am 
surprised that you should try to shut oft 
free speech. I am a Royal Arch Mason, 
but I can't stand the like of this, this 
thing of talking about bloodshed, and I 
won't have it for a minute, if I can pre- 
vent it." I quieted that crowd. I do not 
know whether I prevented bloodshed or 
not, but I want to tell you my blood 
boiled. I turned to my wife, and there 
in the presence of the crowd I kissed her 
and said, "God bless you. Good-by to 
the lodges forever." I have never had 
anything to do with them from that day 
to this. 

I want to say to you that I never got 
fully converted until to-day; I mean on 
one point (there are a whole lot more 
points to get converted on ; we can get 
converted every day of our lives). When 
Brother Blanchard got off all that secret 
work last night I trembled. I said to 
myself, and you know I said it in my 
speech, that I could not give away these 
things ; but whenever the Lord tells me 
to do anything I can do it. I did not 
know that the Lord ever told me to do 
this. I was told this afternoon to read 
Lev. 5 : 4, 5 : "If a soul swear, pronounc- 



ing with his lips to do evil, or to do good, 
whatsoever it be that a man shall pro- 
nounce with an oath, and it be hid from 
him ; when he knoweth of it, then he shall 
be guilty in one of these. And it shall be, 
when he shall be guilty in one of these 
things, that he shall confess that he hath 
sinned in that thing." 

"Whatsoever it be that a man 
shall pronounce with an oath, and it be 
hid from him" — that is all that Masonry 
is ; when you take the obligation of the 
Entered Apprentice degree, you swear 
you won't give away any of these things, 
and yet you don't know what they 
are. I never saw that before. Then, 
"when he knoweth of it" — that is, if he 
afterwards finds it out — "then he shall be 
guilty in one of these. And it shall be, 
when he shall be guilty in one of these 
things, that he shall confess that he hath 
sinned in that thing." 

I make my confession now. Now I am 
free to give away anything I want to. I 
have been wanting to for thirty years, 
and didn't know the Lord wanted me to 
do it. Now I. am free. I have been 
made a freer man to-day than I ever was 
in my life. So I just want to render 
this little tribute to Rev. J. P. Stoddard, 
who was on the picket line as one of the 
vanguards of this country. I heard him 
in 1885. I have tried to get hold of that 
old man from that day until this. I just 
happened to meet Brother W. B. Stod- 
dard, and he looked so much like the old 
gentleman that I asked him if he were 
the man. He said, "No, it was my fath- 
er." I want to tell you, of all the men 
I have met at this Convention, there is 
none whose acquaintance I prize so high- 
ly, on that account, as W. B. Stoddard's. 
His father started me in the right road 
when I was a young man. The importu- 
nities of my wife, the earnestness with 
which she pleaded with me, and that 
meeting which she led me to — or, rather, 
the Holy Spirit led me, through her — I 
am thankful for to-day ; and also for this 
passage of scripture that our brother 
showed me and which I never saw the 
application of before; I have read it and 
re-read it, but it never came home to me 
before. How we permit these scriptures 
to be read by our voice and yet we do 



40 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



not gather up the sweetest strains and 
let the love of God and the Spirit of the 
Lord travel up and down the' corridors 
of our souls, lifting us into the real truth 
and service of our God ! 



Mrs. J. W. Stevens, of Chicago, 
spoke : 

When I was converted I was a mem- 
ber of the Rebekah lodge here in Chi- 
cago. I was Past Grand in the lodge and 
Noble Grand of the degree staff. I have 
never felt led to go to the lodge meet- 
ings after I was converted. One of the 
Rebekah sisters came to me and said I 
was doing very wrong in staying away 
from the lodge ; that I could do a great 
deal of good by going; and she tried to 
persuade me to go and give the unwrit- 
ten work, which I had been doing in the 
different staffs. I told her no ; I felt 
that I should be doing wrong. I said, 
"God has done nothing in secret, and I 
must not." I told her I did not feel that 
I would be obeying God to go ; and so I 
refused to go. They were very much 
displeased with me, and some of them 
became my enemies ; but I stood with 
God ; that is what I am trying to do day 
by day, and what I think we ought to 
do. * 



R. R. Dunlap, of the Moody Bible In- 
stitute : 

I hold a rather unique position. I do 
,not know any man that ever left the 
ranks of one organization, .the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles. I was converted about 
a year ago, when I definitely and posi- 
tively gave my heart to Jesus Christ, 
after listening to talks by my pastor in 
Atlanta, Georgia. In one particular case 
he referred to secret societies, and lie 
pictured the truth by telling the story of 
the Good Samaritan. 

I promised my God that I would give 
up my membership in the fraternal ■ or- 
ganizations, because I do not see how a 
man can follow in the footsteps of Jesus 
Christ and not do so. I gave them up, 
and to-day I thank God for it. 

The President of our country, the so- 
termed Isaiah of the twentieth century, 
belongs to the Eagles, who are stronger 
than the Masons, perhaps. Nobody but 



saloon-keepers and professional sports 
are eligible to membership. All the poli- 
ticians throughout the country belong to 
it. It is an organization which to-day is 
sapping the vitality of the government 
in this country. 

The other organization which I be- 
longed to was the United Commercial 
Travelers. It is patterned after the Or- 
der of Elks, and is stronger than the 
Elks to-day. 

I maintain my insurance in one organi- 
zation, and I am going to settle the ques- 
tion with God, as to whether I ought to 
do so or not. I am of the opinion, some- 
what, that I should not. I thank God 
that I have a minister down in Atlanta, 
Georgia, that had the courage and 
strength to stand out boldly and fearless- 
ly and denounce secret organizations as 
they deserve. I now stand with my lit- 
tle wife, and give her the honor that 
should be bestowed upon her, and such 
attention as a man should do. I thank 
Jesus, not only for my conversion and 
salvation, but that my eyes have been 
opened in regard to secret societies. 



EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS 
Read at the Annual Meeting. 

; Mrs. M. M. Burnap, Touchet, Wash- 
ington, writes : "I request that you ex- 
press to the assembled friends my full- 
est sympathy in the Cause ; and they may 
rest assured my constant thoughts and 
most kindly interest will be centered on 
those two days of their hard work and 
brave endeavor; and although I am not 
a widow, please accept the enclosed 
'mite' as a free-will offering of regards." 



Carry A. Nation, Washington, D. C, 
writes : "I am sorry not to go to your 
Convention. Will try to be present next 
year. O 1 this idolatry ! We will do with 
our might what our hand finds to do." 



Thomas P. Hitchcock, Temperance, 
Mich., writes: "From. my youth I have 
been anti-slavery, anti-secret and anti- 
liquor (or Prohibition), and see at this 
late day no reason for removing the 
'ancient landmarks.' Elder Baird, of 
Pennsylvania, and D. P. Rathburn, of 
New* York, and President Jonathan 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



47 



Blanchard, were the first workers in the 
anti-secret cause that I knew. Since 
that day Rev. J. P. Stoddard and his son, 
Rev. John Lexington, Pres. Charles A. 
Blanchard, Edmond Ronayne, and a host 
of others not less worthy, have bearded 
the lion in his den, and are to-day privil- 
eged to behold a more favorable outlook 
than for many years past." 



Rev. J. A. Richards, Fort Scott, Kans., 
writes: "I am eighty-three years old 
and am glad to bear my testimony to the 
truth. More than ever, I realize that 
the whole system of Secrecy is from the 
bottomless pit, and embraces open doors 
to all evil." 



Mrs. Ella M. Gibboney, Philadelphia, 
Pa., writes: "Your announcement of 
the coming Convention received, and I 
wish it were possible for me to attend. 
The last few numbers of the Cynosure 
have been specially helpful. Dr. Blanch- 
ard's letters are to the point. The great 
need is to reach the ministers and young 
men with such knowledge, before they 
step in the dark into the lodge. I think 
if more who have come out from the 
lodges would testify, it would do so much 
good; but I notice that many, who seem 
to lose their interest, never attending the 
lodge, yet keep very quiet on the sub- 
ject. I wish you Godspeed in the cause 
of right against might." 



Rev. and Mrs. W. O. Dinius, Mono- 
han, Wash., write: "We received your 
kindly invitations to attend the Annual 
Meeting, but were just leaving for our 
son's lovely home on the beautiful banks 
of Lake Sammamish, six miles east of 
Seattle, and find it impossible to attend. 
We wish you one of the best meetings the 
Association ever had, and pray for its 
success against the devil's masterpiece of 
iniquity, viz : the lodge. 

"Give our love and esteem to all the 
dear workers, and especially remember 
us to Elder A. G. Johnson, of Hunting- 
ton, Ind. May God greatly bless the 
dear, good Christian Cynosure, is our 
constant prayer." 



writes : "The devil never made a better 
hit than when he started a campaign to 
make preachers believe they would get 
more influence if they joined these 
lodges. How can we blame the laymen 
for having followed their under-shep- 
herds? And what a curse must lie on 
the shoulders of these hirelings who in- 
sult the Holy Spirit by worshiping in 
these Christless institutions ! Even the 
christ of the highest degree of Masonry 
is not our Christ. It does not require 
a number of godless oaths, and much 
money, to come to our Christ the Son of 
God. 

"I am due to lecture in Springfield the 
2 1 st, but enclose a small donation, wish- 
ing you God's blessing." 



Rev. L. G. Almen, St. Peter, Minn., 
writes : "I assure you that I am with 
you in spirit, wishing and praying that 
the Lord may bless the work of our As- 
sociation everywhere and especially guide 
and enlighten the officers, members, and 
lecturers, who will assemble at the Con- 
vention, so that their deliberations and 
decisions may bring great results of 
glory to God, and liberty from the chains 
of darkness to thousands." 



Rev. S. P. Long, Mansfield, Ohio, 



Rev. Alexander Thomson, Saugatuck, 
Mich., writes: "I send my greeting and 
affirm my interest in all that the N. C. 
A. stands for. I have never wavered 
in my views, since I sat as a member of 
the N. C. A. Board of Directors. All 
my experience in the ministry has been 
in one direction, convincing me of the 
power for godlessness of the whole 
Lodge System. I am not saying that 
there are not good Christian men in the 
lodges. I have found them ; and if all 
in the lodges were not Christians, there 
would be few, in our day, in the king- 
dom on this earth. But it is not the lodge 
that makes them what they are; rather 
they are Christians in spite of it. 

"I have some thought of writing a 
series of short articles for the Cynosure, 
giving some of my experiences with the 
lodges during my ministry; but at pres- 
ent I have an attack of my old nervous 
headache, and will not do much literary 
work." 



48 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



Rev! Dr. H. H. George, Beaver Falls, 
Pa., writes: "I would be glad to give 
my presence and testimony to an uncom- 
promising opposition to the entire fra- 
ternity system. It is wrong in purpose, 
plan, effort, and results. It breaks fam- 
ily confidences, creates strife in neigh- 
borhoods, corrupts politics, sways courts, 
poisons churches, deceives and damns 
immortal souls with a show of religion 
when it has none." 



Additional letters were received from 
the following members of the Associa- 
tion: Mrs. C. C. Shaw, Tiffin, Ohio; 
Eld. A. B. Lipp, Stahl, Mo. ; Eld. J. S. 
Baxter, Afton, Iowa; SamueL Morrison, 
Philip, S. Dak. ; Elizabeth Fabs, Olney, 
111. ; Rutina Fry, Ligonier, Ind. ; Rev. W. 
F. Cochran, Plainfield, 111.; Rev. H. P. 
Gray, Russell, Minn. ; R. M. Stevenson, 
Siloam Springs, Ark. ; J. A. Conant, 
Willimantic, Conn. ; Rev. J. S. McGaw, 
Morning Sun, Iowa ; Rev. S. F. Sprung- 
er, Berne, Ind. ; Rev. A. G. Johnson, 
Huntington, Ind. ; Geo. Win die, Mt. 
Morris, 111. ; Mrs. Emma Whitham, Pon- 
tiac, 111. ; Julia A. Reed, Onsted, Mich. ; 
Rev. John W. Brink, Muskegon, Mich. ; 
F. A. Wood, Wheaton, 111. ; Hedda Wor- 
cester, Stillman Valley, 111. ; A. D. Cline, 
Pikeville, Ky. ; J. C. Berg, Scottdale, 
Penna. ; Rev. J. P. Stoddard, Boston, 
Mass. ; Mrs. Anna E. Stoddard, Boston, 
Mass., and Prof. A. Mellander, Chicago, 
111. 



Rev. Milton Wright, Dayton, Ohio, 
writes : The advocates of antisecrecy 
principles do not fail in argument and 
convincing power. The real difficulty is 
found in the fact that the majority of 
men — and even of Christians — are indif- 
ferent to the rightfulness or wrongful- 
ness of anything supported by wealth 
and numbers. With them the vital ques- 
tion is not whether anything is right and 
pleasing to God, but whether it is passa- 
ble and respectable among men. This 
attitude of public sentiment has been the 
chief obstacle to every wholesome meas- 
ure against intemperance and against 
slavery. It is now the forte of opposi- 
tion to antisecrecy reform. And this 
spirit of moral indifference holds agita- 



tion to be a chief offense against society. 
Like the demoniac, it cries: "Let us 
alone! What have I to do with thee!" 
The labors of our Association need to 
be largely directed to overcoming this 
moral indifference. But for this obtuse- 
ness of the public conscience, the work 
of the Association would be easy. 



E. Ronayne, Harrison, Ark., writes : 
"The May number of the Cynosure has 
come to hand, and as usual it is brimfull 
of excellent things; the letter of Presi- 
dent Blanchard, as always, holding the 
first place. Looking over the Program 
for your forthcoming Annual Meeting, it 
occurred to me that perhaps I ought to 
write 'you, and to suggest that it be made 
very prominent in all the addresses and 
discussions of the Convention, that Free- 
masonry and all its brood of minor secret 
societies not only reject and deny the 
Lord Jesus Christ as man's Redeemer, 
but actually set themselves up as saviors 
in His stead, teaching and alleging that 
strict obedience to the vows, obligations, 
oaths and precepts of the different orders 
is all that man needs to free him from 
sin and fit him for the abode of the bless- 
ed in 'the grand lodge above.' That is 
what Masonry teaches, and what Odd 
Fellowship, the Knights of Pythias, and 
all the other alleged secret societies, 
teach. Jesus is absolutely rejected, and 
secretism, ceremonies, and a pretended 
loyalty to lodge precepts, are substituted 
in His stead. God has set forth Christ 
Jesus, to be a Mercy-seat for man through 
faith in His Blood (Rom. 3: 25) and 
'neither is there salvation in any other, 
for there is none other name under heav- 
en given among men, whereby we must 
be saved' (Acts 4: 12). 

"I don't think it is generally known, 
even among Christian people, that the 
question of sin has been forever settled 
on the Cross, and that the only question 
between God and man,, since Pentecost, is 
that of Son. 'Now once at the end of 
the ages,' Paul says, 'hath He (Christ) 
appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice 
of Himself (Heb. 9: 25, R. V.). Christ 
Jesus 'has by Himself made purgation 
of sins and is set down at the right hand 
of the Majesty on high' (Heb. 1: 3, 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



4!) 



Douay Ver.). The question of sin, there- 
fore, shall never again come up as be- 
tween God and man; and hence* the only 
question to be settled, since Pentecost, 
is that of Son, and so denying and re- 
jecting the Lord Jesus as God's only 
remedy for man's lost and ruined condi- 
tion is simply rejecting and denying the 
only Living and True God and setting 
up in His stead a false, mythical god, 
equal to that found in the very worst 
form of heathenism. 

"The Lord Jesus Himself declares, in 
John 5 123, that 'all should honor the Son, 
even as they honor the Father : he that 
honoreth not the Son, honoreth not the 
Father, who hath sent Him.' Freema- 
sonry, therefore, and the entire system of 
secretism, so-called, is surely the worst 
and most pernicious system of idolatry 
that the modern world has ever seen — 
worse than Romanism even, and only 
equalled by the idolatry of Israel and Ju- 
dah in their gloomiest days of iniquity 
and rebellion against God. 

"I would have these points (enlarged 
upon and elaborated), as strongly set 
forth as possible, all through the meet- 
ings ; and alongside of these I would 
drive home to the very quick of secret- 
ism, that our modern lodge-rooms are an 
exact counterpart of 'the high places' 
of Judah and Israel, as spoken of in 
such terms of utter condemnation in the 
second books of Kings and Chronicles. 
Some of the speakers will doubtless show 
the absolutely illegal character of the 
oaths and obligations of Masonry, as be- 
ing contrary both to the law of God and 
to the law of the land ; but I would have 
the points mentioned above to constitute 
the key-note of the entire Convention. 

"Being 'gathered together unto His 
name,' may the Lord abundantly bless 
your meetings. May the Holy Spirit pre- 
side, and may He take of the things of 
Christ and show them to you all." 



My Reasons for Leaving the Lodge. 

Mrs. G. D. Blackman, Portland, Mich., 
writes : 

"First. I did not have the time to at- 
tend the meetings. 

"Second. It seemed so hard to always 
have the money in hand for assessments. 



"Third. I was disappointed in the 
lodges, as I really believed them to be 
Christian organizations and for the up- 
lifting of humanity. I did not find it so. 

"The fourth and greatest reason is, 
that the Lord did not bless me when I 
attended the lodges. I am glad I am out 
of them all." 



A Seceder's Testimony. 

Rev. W. L. Freese, Portland, Mich., 
writes: "I am more and more convinced 
that the secret-lodge business is the anti- 
christ of the present day; from the fact 
that those who belong to the lodges put 
the church on a lower plane than the 
lodge, by saying they have all the relig- 
ion in the lodge they want, thus admit- 
ting that they are satisfied with a low 
grade of morality, to say nothing about 
Christianity. 

"May the Lord help some of the good, 
honest souls in the lodges to get out, and 
get the straps of secrecy ofT, and do good 
work for the Master." 



MASONIC OATHS IN COURT RECORDS. 

These oaths and penalties were the 
subject of inquiry by courts and legis- 
latures after the Morgan Abduction, and 
there can be found at least the Blue 
Lodge oaths in Wendell's Report, Vol. 
13, pages 9-26, of the New York Stat- 
utes. 



Luzerne, Iowa. 
God's choicest blessings in the fight 
against the abominable lodges. May 
many a soul be captured and placed un- 
der the leadership of our Lord Jesus! 
(Prof.) A. T. Landsmann. 



There is one thing about a pin-wheel, 
it is impelled by its own fire, whirls in a 
circle and is soon burnt out. And there 
are men that remind us of pin-wheels. 



Many, indeed, think of being happy 
with God in Heaven ; but the being happy 
with God on earth never enters their 
thoughts. — John Wesley. 



The morbid soul should remember that 
it will never find sunshine on the shady 
side of the house. 



50 CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. June, 1908. 



A SCRIPTURAL STUDY OF SECRET 

SOCIETIES 



They are of the World, from which Christians 
are required to separate. 

Be ye not unequally yoked together with unbelievers; for what fellowship hath 
righteousness with unrighteousness? and what communion hath light with darkness? 
or what part hath he that believeth with an infidel (unbeliever) ?— II Corinthians 
6:14, 15. 

Have no fellowship with the unfruitful works of darkness, but rather reprove 
them: for it is a shame even to speak of those things, which are done of them in 
secret.— Ephesians 5: 11, 12. 

Blessed is the man that waiketh not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor stand- 
eth in the way of sinners, nor sitteth in the seat of the scornful. — Psalm 1:1. 

, What agreement hath the temple of God with idols? for ye are the temple of 
the living god. * * Wherefore come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith 
the Lord, and touch not the unclean thing; and I will receive you, and will be a Father 
unto you, and ye shall be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord Almighty. — II 
Corinthians 6: 16-18. 






J3W '' 



: f *J 



■■ tf 



II 

Secret Societies spring from distrust of God, which 
is sin and the source of much evil. 

Fear not, little flock; for it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the 
kingdom. — Luke 12: 32. 

Seek ye first the kingdom of God, and His righteousness; and all these things 
shall be added unto you. Take therefore no (anxious) thought for the morrow.— 
Matthew 6,: 33, 3JL ; . '.'■.,. 

My soul, wait thou only upon God; for my expectation is from Him. — Psalm 

, 62:5: ' ■ '- JO ' ' 

'■■ ■ '. { ! ' : ) "' " 

Trust in Him at all times; ye people, pour out your heart before Him: God 

is a refuge for us. — Psalm 62: 8. 

. Fear thou not; for I am with thee: be not dismayed; for I am thy God: I will 
strengthen thee; yea, I will help thee; yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of 
my righteousness. — Isaiah 41: 10. 

For 1 the Lord thy God will hold thy right hand, saying unto thee, Fear not; 
I will help thee. — Isaiah 41: 13. 

I love the Lord, because He hath heard my voice and my supplications. Be- 
cause he hath inclined His ear unto me, therefore I will call upon Him as long as I 
live.— Psalm 116: 1,2. . : 4 <■ • 

, ■ : ' • f A?. . . . ' 

• i . ' . ! • f(',\\ -.,-■'.-■-...-. , 



June, 1908. CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 51 



III 

One cannot unite with these Societies without disregard- 
ing the example and violating the commands 
of Jesus Christ. 

I have given you an example, that ye should do as I have done to you. — John 
13: 15. 

I spake openly to the world; I ever taught in the synagogue, and in the temple, 
whither the Jews always resort; and in secret have I said nothing. — John 18: 20. 

There is nothing covered, that shall not be revealed; and hid, that shall not be 
known. What I tell you in darkness, that speak ye in light: and what ye hear in 
the ear, that preach ye upon the housetops. — Matthew 10: 26, 27. 

Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works, and 
glorify your Father which is in heaven. — Matthew 5: 16. 

Every one that doeth evil hateth the light, neither cometh to the light, lest his 
deeds should be reproved. But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds 
may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God. — John 3: 20, 21. 



IV 

• 

One who loves Lodges will not only unite with the World, 
distrust God, and disregard the example and commands 
of Jesus; but he will care little or nothing about the 
Church of God, and will also share (if he at- 
tends the Lodge) in the worship of Demons. 

No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the 
other; or else he will hold to one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and 
mammon. — Luke 16: 13. 

Choose you this day whom ye will serve: * * as for me and my house, we will 
serve the Lord. — Joshua 24:15. 

Christ loved the church, and gave Himself for it; * * that He might present it 
to Himself a glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing; but 
that it should be holy and without blemish. — Ephesians 5: 25, 27. 

No man cometh unto the Father, but by Me. — John 14:* 6. 

Whosoever denieth the Son, the same hath not the Father. — I John 2: 23. 

There be gods many, and lords many; but to us there is but one God. — I 
Corinthians 8: 5, 6. 

They provoked Him to jealousy with strange gods * *. They sacrificed unto 
devils, not to God; to gods whom they knew not. * * And when the Lord saw it, He 
abhorred them. — Deuteronomy 32: 16, 17, 19. 

But I say, that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, 
and not to God; and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils. Ye 
cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils: ye cannot be partakers of 
the Lord's table, and the table of devils. — I Corinthians 10: 20, 21. 



52 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



ANNUAL MEETING MINUTES. 

MRS. NORA E. KELLOGG, RECORDING SECRE- 
TARY. 

The thirty-fourth Annual Meeting 
and Convention of the National Chris- 
tian Association, Opposed to Secret So- 
cieties, convened in the Chicago Avenue 
(Moody's) Church, at ten o'clock, 
Thursday morning, May 21, 1908. 

Devotional exercises were conducted 
by the chairman, President C. A. Blanch- 
ard, of Wheaton .College. 

Minutes of the last Annual Meeting 
were read by the Recording Secretary. 
Minutes were approved. 

Rev. W. H. Boles was requested by the 
chair to take names of persons present, 
in order to obtain a correct roll. Rev. 
George A. Pegram was appointed as- 
sistant secretary, to prepare roll. All 
persons in sympathy with the object of 
the Association were requested to con- 
sider themselves as members of the 
meeting. 

Mr. J. M. Hitchcock, Secretary of the 
Board of Directors, gave a characteristic 
and interesting report of the meetings 
of the Board during the past year. The 
report was approved after slight verbal 
corrections. 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard, of Washington, 
D. C, Eastern Secretary of the Associa- 
tion, gave his annual report, showing 
eight hundred forty-four subscriptions 
to Cynosure taken ; more than one hun- 
dred antisecret lectures given, and above 
two thousand calls made. The report 
was approved. 

Mr. W. I. Phillips gave Treasurer's 
report; and also read report of Finance 
Committee. 

These reports were approved. 

Committees were appointed as fol- 
lows : 

On Nominations : Rev. Samuel H. 
Swartz, Illinois; Rev. A. G. Johnson,. 
Indiana ;. Rev. Tohn W. Brink, Michi- 
gan; Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull, Wiscon- 
sin ; Rev. J. W. Burton, Ohio ; Rev. W. 

B. Stoddard, Washington, D. C. ; Rev. 
Robert Clarke, Illinois. 

On Finance : Mr. George Windle, Illi- 
nois ; Rev. Joseph Amick, Illinois ; Rev. 

C. C. Hughes, Indiana. 

On Resolutions : Rev. Samuel H. 



Swartz, Illinois ; Rev. George A. Pe- 
gram, Michigan; Rev. E. B. Stewart, 
Illinois ; Mrs. Julia W. Fischer, Illinois ; 
Mrs. Emma Whitham, Illinois. 

In response to call, Rev. Bryant C. 
Preston, of Muscatine, Iowa, gave an 
address, and spoke of his interest in the 
Work, and o<f our mission to hold up 
Christ and to overthrow those associa- 
tions and false altars which wean men 
from Him. 

Rev. J. W. Burton, of New Albany, 
Ohio, was called on to give reasons why 
Christians should organize against any 
evil. The reasons given, briefly, were: 
To give information to the public ; to 
agitate. Because most effective work 
can be done by organized effort; the 
forces of evil are organized, therefore 
opposition must be concentrated. 

In response to call, Rev. William 
Doyle, Summitville, Ind., and Pres. C. 
A. Blanchard spoke forcibly to the same 
question. 

Brief addresses were then given by 
Rev. Samuel H. Swartz and Rev. E. B. 
Stewart. 

On suggestion of Secretary W. I. 
Phillips, an opportunity was given for 
any present, who approved of lodges, to 
speak. 

A gentleman questioned the truthful- 
ness of a statement which had been 
made, earlier in the session, by President 
Blanchard, that this reform concerns the 
civil, domestic, and financial interests of 
every man. The President made reply 
in the way of illustration. In support of 
the points of civil and financial interests 
being concerned, he cited the case, which 
occurred in the city of Chicago, wherein 
a criminal of the name of McGarrigle, 
having been captured and convicted at 
a cost to the taxpayers, as reported, of 
about $60,000, was taken by Sheriff Mat- 
son in an open buggy some five miles 
through the streets to a large house, 
where he was left alone for two hours, 
to take a bath ; during which time he 
was fleeing to Canada. He made good 
his escape. McGarrigle and Sheriff 
Matson were both Knight Templar Ma- 
sons. As showing the effect of lodges 
in the sphere of domestic interests, Pres- 
ident Blanchard told the experience of a 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



53 



woman who was employed as a servant 
by his pastor, Rev. Mr. Wise. This 
woman, with her husband, had lived in 
Evanston, 111. They had a happy home, 
and were in prosperous circumstances. 
The husband was persuaded to join the 
Masonic lodge. As a result he lost in- 
terest in his home, and finally, after bor- 
rowing all the money he could and mort- 
gaging the home which covered his wife 
and child, he fled the country. His wife 
never heard of him since. 

After notices were given by the Gen- 
eral Secretary, and prayer by Rev. Rob- 
ert Clarke, the convention adjourned un- 
til two o'clock p. m. 

Thursday Afternoon. 

The Convention convened with Presi- 
dent Blanchard in the chair. 

Rev. Helmer T. Smidt, of the Pres- 
byterian church, Chicago, offered prayer, 
and music was furnished by the Moody 
Institute Ladies' Quartette. 

Minutes of morning session were read 
and approved, and a collection taken, 
after which the printed program was 
carried out by Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull, 
Mrs. Amanda Smith, Mrs. Frances C. 
Blanchard, and Rev. Mary L. Moreland, 
and we are glad to know that their ad- 
dresses will appear in not distant num- 
bers of the Christian Cynosure. 

Notices were given, and a closing 
prayer offered by Rev. George Brad- 
field, office editor of "The Free Metho- 
dist," Chicago. 

Thursday Evening. 

A large and enthusiastic audience lis- 
tened to Mr. W. FI. Boles and Pres. C. 
A. Blanchard. Their addresses will ap- 
pear in the Christian Cynosure. 

Music was furnished by the Moody 
Institute Male Quartette. 

Devotional exercises were led, Friday 
morning, by Rev. A. G. Johnson, 

The Committee on Nominations re- 
ported by Rev. J. W. Brink, with recom- 
mendations as follows, which recom- 
mendations were adopted: 

For President, Charles A. Blanchard ; 
for Vice-President, John Groen ; 
for Recording Secretary, Mrs. Nora E. 
Kellogg; for General Secretary and 
Treasurer, William I. Phillips ; for 
Board of Directors: Charles A. Blanch- 



ard, B. H. Einink, E. Breen, B. E. Ber- 
gesen, J. M. Hitchcock, Robert Clarke, 
George Windle, E. B. Stewart, Ezra A. 
Cook, William B. Rose, and Samuel H. 
Swartz ; Auditors : J. T. Logan, Joseph 
P. Shaw, H. F. Kletzing. 

The Nominating Committee further 
recommended, "That there be hence- 
forth as many Vice-Presidents as there 
are State organizations." After discus- 
sion it was voted to refer this recom- 
mendation to a committee, consisting of 
Rev. J. W. Brink and Rev. B. E. Berge- 
sen, for formulation. The report of this 
committee was adopted as follows : 

"i. That in addition to the usual offi- 
cers there shall be elected at the Annual 
Convention one Vice-President for every 
State Christian Association. 

"2. Unless in individual cases it is 
found inconvenient, the Presidents of 
the State Associations shall be elected to 
such office. 

"3. They shall, personally or by sub- 
stitute, give a report to the Annual Con- 
vention as to matters pertaining to State 
work." 

Moved by Rev. S. H. Swartz, and car- 
ried, That we elect the present State 
Presidents as Vice-Presidents of the Na- 
tional Christian Association, as follows: 
Rev. L. G. Bears, for Indiana; Rev. F. 
M. Foster, for New York and New Jer- 
sey; Rev. J. S. McGaw, for Iowa; Rev. 
J. W. Brink, for Michigan; Rev. A. D. 
Zahniser, for Pennsylvania, and Rev. W. 
J. Sanderson, for Ohio. 

The following were voted into Corpo- 
rate membership: Miss M. Elizabeth 
Kellogg, St. Paul, Nebr. ; Rev. L. G. 
Bears, Peru, Ind. ; Rev. F. M. Foster, 
New York City; Mrs. Elizabeth M. 
Rull, Star Prairie, Wis.: Mrs. A. G. 
Johnson, Huntington, Ind. ; Rev. Will- 
iam Doyle, Summitville, Ind. ; Rev. J. 
W. Burton, New Albany, Ohio; Rev. C, 
C. Hughes, Owasco, Ind.; Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilbur S. Orvis, Wheaton, III. 

The General Secretary read very in- 
teresting extracts from letters to the 
Convention received from members of 
the Association residing in widely differ- 
ent sections of our country. 

A message and greetings to the Con- 
vention from Rev. I. P. Stoddard, of 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



Boston, Mass., was brought by his son, 
Rev. W. B. Stoddard. 

On motion of Rev. B. E. Bergesen it 
was voted that Rev. W. B. Stoddard be 
requested to tender the greetings of the 
Convention to his venerable father. 

Mr. W. H. Boles, by courtesy of the 
meeting, spoke of his book, "Treason in 
Washington." 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard submitted the 
names of the following as a committee 
to furnish reports of the Convention to 
the religious press: Rev. J. W. Brink, 
The Banner; Rev. S. H. Swartz, North- 
western Christian Advocate; Eld. Joseph 
Amick, The Gospel Messenger; Rev. B. 
E. Bergesen, Kirk etid end e ; Rev. A. G. 
Johnson, Home Mission News; Rev. E. 
Breen, De Wachter; Mrs. E. A. Cook, 
Congregationalist; Rev. E. P. Kuhl, The 
Advance; Mr. W. H. Boles, Uncle Sam 
and Christian Standard. 

Mr. J. M. Hitchcock suggested that 
the Association purchase one or more 
columns of the Chicago Daily News, to 
publish testimonies of eminent men and 
other matter in regard to the antisecrecy 
cause. Sixty-five dollars was subscribed 
for that purpose. 

It was voted that W. I. Phillips, C. A. 
Blanchard and J. M. Hitchcock be a 
committee, with power, in respect to se- 
curing space in the Daily News of Chi- 
cago for the testimonies contained in the 
program of the Convention and other 
like matter. 

On Friday evening Dr. A. C. Dixon 
delivered an address on "The Ethics of 
Secrecy," a partial synopsis of which 
was printed the following day (May 
23d) in the Chicago Daily News, and 
which will appear in full in the Chris- 
tian Cynosure. 



Men of the noblest dispositions think 
themselves happiest when others share 
their happiness with them. — Taylor. 



Never depend upon, your genius; if 
you have none, industry will supply the 
deficiency. — Ruskin. 



There is nothing like necessity to over- 
come the inertia of indolence. 



SECRETARY W. B. STODDARD'S 
ANNUAL REPORT. 

To the Friends of the Antisecrecy 

Cause, Greeting: 

Your Eastern Secretary is permitted 
to report in health and strength the Prov- 
idence that has kept him through anoth- 
er year. In many respects the year just 
closed has been similar to those preced- 
ing. My past experiences have led to 
greater faith and caused me to venture 
on new fields, and into enlarged work. 
The divine promise to supply our need 
has again proved true. We may well 
record our thanks as we look to the fu- 
ture. 

The obstacles to our work have not 
diminished. Trials and hindrances come, 
directly and indirectly ; from friends as 
well as foes. If the real friends of re- 
form could get together, so as to pre- 
sent a solid front to the enemy, their 
strength would be very largely increas- 
ed. This cannot be expected with pres- 
ent environments and conditions. We 
must struggle along, as best we can, with 
what we have. It is always wise to look 
on the sunny side. There is surely much 
to cheer and encourage. 

My support from the headquarters 
has been generous and cordial. I have 
always found the N. C. A. doing for its 
agents as well as its means would per- 
mit. Shall we not hope that larger 
means may be provided and the increas- 
ing needs met? 

It is well known that there is a ten- 
dency on the part of some Christians and 
Christian churches, to get rid 
of the antisecrecy cross, and seek 
the more popular way. Cross- 
bearing Christians are now, as 
usual, in the minority. Yet I am glad 
to report that in the Eastern field there 
are still more calls than I can answer; 
more open doors than I can enter. Does 
the enemy come in like a flood? God 
raises up His standard.- Good men and 
women are asking help to withstand this 
foe. Churches whose interest and con- 
cern in this matter has not been what it 
should have been, are being aroused. 
German Baptist Brethren, Mennonite, 
and other similar church bodies are feel- 
ing more the need of our help; perhaps 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



oo 



because they note the departure of some 
son or daughter entrapped by the ene- 
my's snares. 

The number of schools open to my 
message is not less than in other years. 
Some of the friends I meet in travel, 
date their interest in our work to some 
school hearing of years ago. Surely the 
antichrist of the Lodge should be made 
prominent in all Christian schools. 

Revival meetings have been utilized in 
giving out the light. The saying, " Strike 
while the iron is hot," is good for us to 
remember. When people are aroused, 
there is special opportunity for good im- 
pression. There is always something 
wrong with the individual or church that 
refuses to welcome antisecrecy light 
when properly presented. I have been 
glad to note that some who with hesita- 
tion allowed reference to the Lodge dur- 
ing revival meetings, now readily con- 
sent, and even solicit such help. 

The number of lectures invited by 
Lutheran friends is increasing. As my 
acquaintance grows, pastors become more 
trusting, and gladly introduce the N. C. 
A. representative to their people. Many 
feel that an outside presentation of truths 
they have always taught, confirms the 
same in the minds of those who hear. 
Then, the specialist, of course, can treat 
the case as the generalist cannot. The 
old chart, that has served so many years, 
is still popular in such presentation. 

It has been my privilege to address 
191 congregations during the year, anti- 
secrecy messages being delivered to more 
than one-half. Collections, aside from 
moneys given for the expenses of the 
State Conventions, amounted to $251.55. 
My expenses have been as follows : meals 
and lodgings, $157.25; railway fares, 
$336.34; postage, $10.25. While expenses 
have increased, collections have not been 
as large as in some years. Inability to 
secure permits on the railroads quite ma- 
terially increased my expense in travel. 
The number of Cynosure subscriptions 
secured is 844. The estimated number 
of calls, 2,355. Conventions for Ohio, 
Indiana, New York-New Jersey, and 
Pennsylvania, have been held and duly 
reported to the Cynosure. Each contrib- 
uted its share to the general good. 



Fields unvisited for years have been 
reached ; the claims of Christ, as opposed 
to the lodge enemy, presented; many 
souls brought to a knowledge of new 
truth; and a blessing received as I have 
sought to be a blessing to others. My 
belief in the ultimate triumph of righte- 
ousness is unshaken. If allied with 
Christ, we shall surely march on to ulti- 
mate and eternal victorv. 

W.' B. Stoddard. 



SECRECY OUR GREAT EVIL. 
President Eliot says it Characterizes 

All Our Public Affairs. 

Special to the New York Times. 

Cincinnati, Ohio, April 22. — "The 
great evil in American governmental af- 
fairs, from Washington down to the 
small cities and towns, is secrecy," said 
President Eliot to-night while address- 
ing a large audience. 

"It characterizes the determining ac- 
tion in all formal action. The trouble 
lies in the fact that, while there may be 
a semblance of publicity, the real deter- 
mination is made out of sight." 



ITALIAN MASONS IN MASSACHU- 
SETTS. 

An Italian tailor who came to this 
country from Naples, Italy, about twenty 
years ago, was, for about ten years, in 
business in New York. Since then he 
has been in Springfield, Massachusetts. 
Italy lodge, of New York, made him a 
Mason, and he has always wished for an 
Italian lodge in the city to which lie re- 
moved. His wish is likely now to be 
gratified, for an application for a char- 
ter has been filed with the grand lodge 
of Mr. Rugg's jurisdiction. 

English-speaking Masons allowed 
their recommendation to accompany the 
application. Seven charter members 
were ready to start the lodge, and the 
enthusiastic Springfield tailor is sure that 
the number can be swelled to fifty by 
collecting Italians into this new lodge 
from various places in the State. He 
himself has taken the 32d degree, but 
five of the seven have not gone beyond 
the Blue Lodge. 



Men should be judged by actions and 
not by appearances. 



5G 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



TREASURER'S ANNUAL REPORT. 

National Christian Association. 

From May 1, 1907, to April 30, 1908. 

RESOURCES. 

Real Estate — 

Carpenter Building $15,000.00 

Minnesota 540.85 

Bills Receivable 6,939.00 

Merchandise on hand — coal, 

etc 71. 1 1 

Subscriptions due on Cynosure 133.63 

Christian Cynosure 2,000.00 

Books in stock 1,113.05 

W. H. Fischer, Trustee 8,300.00 

Fixtures 381.15 

Publishing Material 785.81 

Reference Library 296.95 

Jaqua Land Contract 220.00 

Tracts in Stock 465.45 

Dawson Farm Interest 5,000.00 

Postage Stamps on Hand. . . 33-o6 

Suspense Accounts 1,350.00 

Personal Accounts due 254.66 



Cash on hand May 1, 1908 



$42,884.72 
347.68 



$43,232.40 

LIABILITIES. 

Annuities — 

Capwell $ 30.00 

Smith 200.00 

Johnson 100.00 

Ohio 1,000.00 

New York . i,200 T oo 

Michigan 300.00 

Woodward 50.00 

Sundry Funds — 

Cynosure Extension $ 4.27 

Ohio Endowment 1,160.00 

Pennsylvania Endowment. . 100.00 

Theological Seminary Fund 2.20 

Personal accounts payable .... 64.02 
Cynosure subscriptions paid in 

advance 998.31 



$5,208.80 

Capital Account, consisting of 
the Eastern Annuity, Gen- 
eral Endowment, Carpenter 
Building, etc 38,023.60 



FINANCE COMMITTEE S STATEMENT. 

To the National Christian Association : 

The undersigned, members of the Fi- 
nance Committee, have examined the 
books of your Treasurer, W. I. Phillips, 
up to April 30th, 1908, inclusive, and find 
that they are correctly kept, and that 
there are vouchers for all expenditures. 
We also find that securities are on hand 
as stated in the annual report of the 
Treasurer. 

We have also examined the report of 
Wm. H. Fischer, Trustee of Annuity 
Funds, and find the same to' be correct 
and in accordance with the books of the 
Treasurer. 

Ezra A. Cook, 
H. F. Kletzing, 
W. B. Rose, 
Finance Committee. 



The editor of the Wesley an Methodist, 
in commenting on the crimes committed 
by the "Black Hand," asks this very per- 
tinent question : "Just what gives it such 
power for evil ? Could its members com- 
mit such dastardly crimes and go unpun- 
ished if these two factors were left out, 
that of secrecy and the pledge to protect 
each other? 

"If it is these which makes the Black 
Hand such a deadly evil why may it not 
be just as bad when secrecy and the oath 
to stand by each other, murder and trea- 
son not excepted, form the basis of any 
other secret order? 

"We affirm and stand ready to prove 
that the Masonic order requires its mem- 
bers to pledge themselves to secrecy and 
to stand by each other, in some of the de- 
grees, murder and treason not excepted, 
and that these oaths are made binding by 
penalties as blood curdling as can be 
framed by any use of words. If they 
are so bad in the lips of Black Hand 
members how is it they become so inno- 
cent in the lips of Masons? The Mor- 
gan and other murders show that they 
are not innocent anywhere." 



Seasons of worldly prosperity are sea- 



sons of danger to the soul. 



$43,232.40 



Education is the open sesame of capa- 
city. 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Iett>0 of ©ur Pori 



Our Eastern Secretary, Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, left May 26 for Ohio, where 
he hopes to arrange for the State Con- 
vention to meet the last of June. Further 
notice will be sent the Ohio friends. 



MICHIGAN AGENT'S REPORT. 

Dear Cynosure : 

After my last letter I preached April 
19 at Oceana Center and Cedar, both in 
Oceana County. The people at the form- 
er place desiring special services, I gave 
them Bible readings for nearly two 
weeks. The work was more intensive 
than extensive. It was designed princi- 
pally to help the church, and it did, to 
which many testified. Quite a number 
were very serious, and had about de- 
cided to come to Christ, when the meet- 
ing closed to prepare for quarterly meet- 
ing and the W. C. T. U. Convention 
held there. These special services gave 
the State Agent more than one opportu- 
nity to show the injury of lodgery to 
the Christian life. These efforts were well 
received, except by two or three families 
of lodge folks. 

On Sunday, April 26th, I preached at 
Ferry twice ; in the morning, on "Chris- 
tian Charity versus Lodge Selfishness." 
I showed not onlv that the so-called 
Lodge Charity is not charity, but that 
it is not good business, since some lodges 
only pay back about one-third of what 
is paid in ; while others pay much more 
to some than they pay in, and none at 
all to those who cannot continue pay- 
ment of dues from lack of means to meet 
increased assessments, or to those who 
cannot pay any more to such an institu- 
tion from conscientious scruples. The 
very ones whom God requires us to favor 
— the really needy — and the conscien- 
tious, these receive neither sympathy nor 
money from the Lodge, a hypocritical in- 
stitution which many claim is founded on 
the Bible, and follows its precepts. 

I also showed that the churches which 
tolerate or defend secrecy are usually 
lacking in charity and hospitality. It 
made some of the lodge church-members 
in Ferry very angry. I afterward learn- 



ed why. They themselves were guilty 
of the very things I struck. So in the 
evening I showed how the lodges dom- 
inate and corrupt churches which toler- 
ate them. 

One of the things which the lodges 
have tried to do in Ferry, as in every 
other place, is to thrust themselves into 
the anti-secret church at funerals, memo- 
rials, or celebrations. Lodge people seem 
to have no sense of courtesy, propriety or 
right. On one occasion they ran a lodge 
show into my church, while I was away. 
On another, they appointed a lodge fu- 
neral at my hour of service, the sermon 
to be preached by a lodge minister of 
another denomination. On still another, 
I had hired a brother minister to come 
forty or fifty miles to preach for me 
while I visited my relatives, and paid 
him out of my own pocket. When he 
came to the church, it was in possession 
of a lodge, celebrating the death of a 
man who never attended church. 

May 1 2th and 13th I went to Muske- 
gon in the interests of the N. C. A. The 
Muskegon classis of the Christian Re- 
formed Church was in session there. 
Pressure of business did not permit any 
speech, but the brethren were very kind 
in assisting me otherwise in my work. 
I distributed quite a number of tracts 
and secured six new subscriptions for 
the Cynosure and several renewals. 

I then went to Grand Rapids. The in- 
cessant storm did not permit much work 
there. 

At Holland I sold a set of books on 
lodgery to one Christian Reformed 
church, for their library. I gave a short 
address also at the Central Avenue Chris- 
tian Reformed church. They took some 
books for their library, and expect to 
get more. Every church library ought 
to have a set of antisecret books. 

May 17th was a great day for my 
work. In the morning I addressed the 
Baptist church in Hart on "Separation 
from the World." This address brought 
out quite a number of responses and in- 
quiries. In the afternoon I spoke in the 
Baptist church in Mears on "Christian 
Charity versus Lodge Selfishness." In 
the evening I preached in the United 
Brethren church on "Oaths and Secrecy." 



5S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



Nearly all the people at all of these serv- 
ices appreciated the truth, and declared 
themselves so. Hart is so lodge-ridden 
that one would not have thought so many 
open to the truth would be found. Many 
desired literature on secrecy. I distrib- 
uted tracts, and got a club of Cynosure 
subscribers. 

Yours for victory, 

G. A. Pegram. 



AGENT F. J. DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Pear Christian Cynosure : 

I praise God, for His mercy endureth 
forever. I was invited to speak at Ox- 
ford, Miss., by Dr. J. C. Leonard, the 
able and fearless pastor of the Second 
Baptist Church, who with his good peo- 
ple have shown me every consideration. 
Several persons who were ardent secret- 
ists last year, when I made my first visit 
to Oxford, have since become convinced 
of the anti-christian spirit of the lodge, 
and are now free from its snare. Many 
have said to me, "Dr. Davidson, the 
Cynosure is an eye-opener, and I wish I 
was able to keep up my subscription." 
The people in this commuity are very 
poor. There is practically nothing for 
them to do but to farm, and the land is, 
in most cases, unproductive. If the secret 
lodge cactus had not planted its terrible 
roots here among these simple people 
some years ago, many of them would be 
in much better financial circumstances. 
But God be praised, their eyes are being 
opened and the lodge is losing ground. 
I preached eleven consecutive nights 
here, to large and appreciative audi- 
ences. As a result, nineteen were saved 
by faith in the Lord, several Cynosure 
subscriptions received and a very good 
collection given. 

At Union City, Tenn., 
I met a hearty welcome. I preached 
twice for Rev. Bruton at the Second 
Baptist church, received a small contri- 
bution and secured several subscriptions. 
I also delivered an address at the Min- 
isters' Alliance^ and secured their en- 
dorsement of our work. 

At Cairo, III., 
I was very cordially invited by Prof. J. 
M. Arter, president of Manning Bible 
School, to deliver an address, which I 
did. Also, by invitation of Dr. J. H. 



Knowles, the respected pastor of Mount 
Moriah Baptist church and President of 
the Mount Olive Baptist Association, I 
preached at Mt. Moriah church. I find 
that the secret lodge and the saloon ele- 
ment, who formed an unholy confeder- 
acy to cripple me in my influence here in 
Cairo, and by the use of four unscrupu- 
lous women, who have very little regard 
for themselves, less for their, religious 
profession, and none at all for truth, 
stirred up a hornets' nest in the Nine- 
teenth Street church last month, are 
now like the injured boy rubbing 
his toe. The preacher who engi- 
neered the whole matter, with the 
hope of becoming my successor, has lost 
his two country churches, and now 
the Nineteenth Street church has refus- 
ed to extend him a call. There are 
many good Christian people in that 
church, whose soul is bent on doing- 
right, and who are worthy of the con- 
fidence of any Christian. I pray God 
that the few Christian people in this 
modern Sodom will cry mightily to God 
for deliverance from the lodge and the 
saloon. 

At Centralia, 111. 
By invitation of the Central Baptist 
church I came here. I find the twin 
devils, the Lodge and the Saloon, have 
a strong foothold here, but nothing like 
wicked Cairo. Centralia is a very pretty 
city, with twelve churches and fifteen sa- 
loons and legions of secret societies 
among colored and white. However, 
there seems to be a decreasing interest 
in both the Lodge and Saloon. I preach- 
ed here four times and secured several 
subscriptions and a donation. I have de- 
cided to settle here. Persons who are 
desirous of securing my services for lec- 
tures, can write me at 502 North Elm 
street, Centralia, 111. I think much can 
be done here to enlighten the people. 

At Mound City, III., 
Dr. Charles H. Houghes, formerly of 
Kentucky, the energetic and fearless 
young pastor of the -Second Baptist 
church, invited me to preach for him. I 
accepted the invitation and preached sev- 
eral sermons. I secured a few subscrip- 
tions and a collection for our Work. Dr. 
Houghes is a seceder from the Masons, 
Odd Fellows, and Knights of Pythias. 



June, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



59 



He accepted this work last November, 
and it is admitted on all sides that he 
has done more to elevate the masses and 
build up a healthy church than all of his 
predecessors. He also has added 
twenty-four members to the church. 
The lodge octopus is here, like in most 
places, offensively strong ; but with Dr. 
Houghes' fearless leadership and the 
Christian Cynosure, I am quite sure 
many eyes will be opened. I go from 
here to the Baptist State Convention at 
Duquoin, thence again to Centralia and 
Union City, Tenn. I ask the prayers of 
the Lord's faithful few. 

Yours in Christian Love, 

Francis J. Davidson, 
502 North Elm St., 
Centralia, 111. 



W. B. STODDARD'S LETTER. 

Buck Creek, Ind., May 18, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure : This finds me en route 
to N. C. A. Annual Meeting, with all the 
work I can handle by the way. 

The efforts in New York and vicinity, 
following my last report, were success- 
ful. A Sabbath of rest was found at 
the home of our brother and co-worker, 
Lagville, at Corona, Long Island. An 
opportunity to meet friends and increase 
the Cynosure subscription list was found 
in a meeting of Missouri Lutheran pas- 
tors in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

A preaching service was rendered the 
Brethren church on two Sabbaths at 
Washington, D. C. A visit was made to 
our good friend Durr and others, of Men - 
nonite faith, near Masontown, Pa. A 
lecture was given in the German Bap- 
tist church of which Jasper Barnthouse 
is elder, in Uniontown, Pa., on the even- 
ing of May 5th. On the following even- 
ing I addressed the young people of Pas- 
tor George Eyler's Lutheran church in 
Youngstown, Ohio. A good interest was 
manifest at both lectures, and contribu- 
tions were kindly given to the Cause. 

At the old home towns of Columbus and 
Cedarville, Ohio, I saw some of the old 
friends, who were ready as ever to ren- 
der suppose to the Cause. I found our 
dear brother, D, H. Harrington, of Co- 
lumbus, much broken in health, but 
stronsf in the faith. Much observation 



and experience have confirmed his be- 
lief that the Lodge is the natural home 
of the enemy of righteousness. The Cap- 
ital University, that always welcomes the 
antisecrecy representative, was found in 
its usual prosperity, fitting young men 
for a service that will work against the 
lodge evil. 

It has always been a delight to visit 
Berne, Indiana. The godly people there 
found are an inspiration. This happy 
people make it their business to serve 
the Lord, and raise large, fine horses to 
pay expenses. My addresses here were 
delivered in the Mission Mennonite 
church in the country, and the Mennon- 
ite church in town. I spoke to large, ap- 
preciative audiences. Some forty sub- 
scriptions to the Cynosure, and a $12.56 
collection were given in support of the 
N. C. A. work. 

Hastening on to Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
I found myself welcome, as expected, at 
the meeting of the Missouri Lutheran 
friends gathered in the General Synod. 
This Synod meets once in three years. 
Dr. Franz Pieper, the President, made a 
report in which it was shown that this, 
the largest body of Lutherans in this 
country, is growing at a marvelous rate. 
In the last three years they have gained 
125 pastors, 284 congregations and 38,- 
331 communicants. They expended for 
home missions $134,000 per year, and 
still there was great need in this direc- 
tion. There were said to be 720 pas- 
tors and delegates present, aside from 
visitors, at this gathering. The local 
congregations at Fort Wayne, in enter- 
taining the Synod, provided the dinners 
so all might eat together. The sight 
of these strong, earnest Christian work- 
ers eating together as the college band 
played "America," "The Star-Spangled 
Banner," etc., will not soon be forgot- 
ten. The applause that followed the 
band selections showed a warm love for 
country as well as for those who so 
splendidly served. These people stand 
as one man against the Secret Lodge Sys- 
tem. Though the Synod was much 
crowded with business, your agent was 
given a glad hearing, followed by over 
fifty subscriptions for the Cynosure. 

At the Bible Training School, Fort 



60 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Juue, 1908. 



"Wayne, where the last Indiana State 
Convention met, I found a cordial hos- 
pitality and was assured that I was count- 
ed as one of the family. President 
Schultz is hard at work and is being 
ably supported in his efforts to make this 
an ideal school for Christian young men 
and women who go as mission and 
other workers. A talk of one hour was 
given the students, by special request 
of the President. 

Dr. C. A. Mummart, elder of the Rad- 
ical United Brethren church, joined me 
at Huntington, Indiana, and brought me 
to appointments here. I have spoken 
three times in the United Brethren 
church two miles in the country. Many 
stood outside last evening unable to get 
seats in the church. It was very warm 
but the people remained together for 
over two hours, while truths pertaining 
to the Lodges were presented. There 
were several Masons and other secret 
society people in the audience. I am 
told this address is likely to be the talk 
of the neighborhood for weeks to come. 
Let us pray that God will bless the truth 
to the good of manv. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., April 16, 1908. 
Wm. I. Phillips, Chicago, 111. 
Dear Brother in Christ : 

I have just got in from Sherrill, Ark. 
I had a great battle with Satan last Sun- 
day. I had an appointment at a church 
out in the country. The deacon of this 
church tried in a sly way to keep me 
from talking, but the Lord, through one 
of the preachers, let me talk. This is 
Rev. John Wesley's church, and they 
had turned him off because he was 
against the Lodge. They thought to 
keep me from talking about the Lodge, 
but failed. I lectured one hour on the 
sin of secret societies, and many be- 
lieved the report of the N. C. A. I made 
the secret work so plain that a child 
could understand. The people looked 
like they were spellbound. 

I learned while I was there that they 
had just run off one of their brothers in 
the Oddfellow lodge at Pastoria, about 
eight miles from Sherrill. The man had 



killed his wife seven years ago. He also 
killed two men in their lodge, for giving 
away their secrets. Then the lodge 
brothers run him here to Arkansas. He 
pretended he had never been married and 
courted a woman and married her. 

He had been here seven years, until a 
man came here last month and exposed 
him. So the brothers here took him 
fifteen miles away through the country. 
The man that carried him was arrested. 
I don't know yet what will be done with 
them for running him off. 

I will not be at the Annual Conven- 
tion, but my prayer will be for your 
meeting. God bless you, and may He 
get the glory of the meeeting. I am 
still fighting the lodge sin in God's 
name. 



Seceders. 

Mrs. W^oods sends the following list 
of names of seceders, mostly preachers, 
who have given up their lodges. She 
has been instrumental in bringing very 
many out of secret societies with which 
they have been affiliated. 

J. H. Neaslev (Mason), Altheimer, 
Ark. 

D. L. Lindsey (Mason), Pine Bluff, 
Ark. 

L. C. Culliver (Mason), Pine Bluff, 
Ark. 

Samuel Thomas (Mason), Humph- 
rey, Ark. 

R. W. W 7 ilson (Odd Fellow), Pine 
Bluff, Ark. 

Frank Obriant (Knight of Pythias), 
Tucker, Ark. 

I. G. Bailey (Odd Fellow), Dermott, 
Ark. 

Scott Gray (Mason), Parkdale, Ark. 

R. N. Rideout (Knight of Pythias), 
Dermott, Ark. 

Rev. Bankhead (Mason), Pine Bluff, 
Ark. 

G. T. Saxton (Knight of Pythias), 
Pine Bluff, Ark. 

L. W. Blue, Gourd, Ark. 

R. A. Adams, Baxter, Ark. 

J. P. Robinson (Mason), Little Rock, 
Ark. 

M. Resin, Elerson, Ark. 

Martin Prude (Mason), Vincent, 
Ark. 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



61 



A. F. D. Dixon, Earl, Ark. 

A. Davis (Mason), La Grange, Ark. 

J. I. Johnson, Montrose, Ark. 

J. W. Dancer (Knight of Labor), W. 
Pullen St., Pine Bluff, Ark. 

W. L. Polk (Odd Fellow), West End 
Station, No. 2, Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Silas Thompson (Knight of Pythias), 
Humphrey, Ark. 

John Sims, Little Rock, Ark. 

P. A. Knowles, Little Rock, Ark. 

Rev. Rilla. 

R. N. Davis, Forest City, Ark. 

W. L. Grant (Odd Fellow), Sherrill, 
Ark. 

K. Whitehead, Wabbaseka, Ark. 

N. Whitehead, Wabbaseka, Ark. 

R. H. Hill (seceder from seven 
lodges), Altheimer, Ark. 

Miller Johnson, Wabbaseka, Ark. 

Wm. Ecwood, Tomberlins, Ark. 

Prof. Willingham, Tucker, Ark. 



April 28, 1908. 

This is to let you know that I have re- 
ceived the last tracts you sent. I also 
have some more names of pastors who 
have given up lodges. All these men 
are strong leaders. Rev. K. Whitehead 
is a great leader in this State. N. White- 
head is his son. All the names I have 
sent you are of pastors, except R. N. 
Rideout and R. N. Davis. They are 
both State missionaries. 

I met a doctor on the train yesterday, 
and handed him some tracts. He was a 
Mason. He read the tract called "Free- 
masonry". After he had read the tract, 
he sat and looked at me for a few min- 
utes like he wanted to whip me. He 
was so puzzled over the tract that he 
could not keep his seat. He came to me 
and asked me to let him sit with me. I 
said, "Oh, yes ; sit down." I was glad 
to get to talk with him. He asked me 
where I got the tracts. It afforded me 
much pleasure to tell him of the Na- 
tional Christian Association. He was 
astonished beyond measure. He said, 
"Madam, my home is in Monroe, Louisi- 
ana ; and if you were to come down 

there, you would be ." He 

caught himself and did not finish the 
sentence. I said, "killed". I finished 
it for him. Fie shook his head and 
showed his teeth like a big bulldog 



when he is chained to a post and wants 
to bite somebody. 

I just talked on about their secrets, 
till all in the train stopped to listen. 
They will stop when they hear a woman 
telling their secrets. The doctor was a 
Christian man, and I talked to him and 
explained the whole calf -worship to him, 
and he got in a good humor with me 
and said, "You are right ; as long as I 
have been a Mason, I just now see that 
it is a false religion." I told him to 
look in his Bible and see if he could find 
any of the writers of the thirty-nine 
books of the Old , Testament, or the 
twenty-seyen books of the New Testa- 
ment, writing anything for a secret so- 
ciety. He said, "No ; I know they were 
all writing for the church, the home and 
civil government." I said, "Then where 
do you get texts for your annual serm- 
ons?" He laughed. I said, "Did you 
ever see Jubela, and Jubelo, and Jube- 
lum, in the Bible?" He said, "No." I 
said, "You are afraid to say Mah-Hah- 
Bone above your breath, but you are not 
afraid of God, who made you and gave 
you all you have. You bowed down to 
another god and let him persuade you 
to swear to conceal what was about to 
be revealed to you. You made a coven- 
ant with hell, and you ought to break 
it right now. He and I parted at the 
railway station. He said, "God bless 
you. Pray for me." 

Yours for the work, 

Lizzie Woods. 

P. S. — They caught the Odd Fellow 
that I told you about. The lodge broth- 
ers sent him to the Territory, but the 
officer ran him down, and he is in jail 
in the State of Mississippi. As soon as 
the lodge members here found out that 
the man was known, they met and taxed 
all the brothers seventy-five cents to run 
him off. I know they taxed them all 
seventy-five cents, for I overheard two 
men talking about it. One of them said, 
"We were up all night last night, fuss- 
ing about the taxation." He said, "They 
came near to a fight over it, and some 
of the brothers are coming out of the 
lodge. I, for one, am going to quit. I 
am not going to protect murderers. I 
am a Christian and I believe in what is 
right." 



62 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



WHAT THINK YE? 

Some people don't think. The Rev. 
Moench, pastor of St. Paul's Roman 
Catholic Church, at Valparaiso, Tnd., 
halted 2,000 persons, August 27th last, 
in a funeral procession. The casket 
contained a member of his church, and 
was followed by members of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters. Pastor 
Moench allowed the procession to come 
to the doors of his church, where he bade 
them stop and "separated the sheep from 
the goats," the Foresters going their way. 
The Roman Church holds them as ene- 
mies of the Christian religion, and be- 
lieves their influence inimical to the best 
interests of morality. 

Elijah Dowie anathematized the Free 
Masons; many Protestant churches are 
doing the same thing. Go to the city of 
Holland and you will find the church 
gates shut against all such things. Why, 
a secret order could no more invade their 
pulpit, with white aprons and gloves, than 
the devil could get into heaven with horns 
and hoofs. Their church-pulpit and 
pews are dedicated to Jesus Christ. 
— Editorial in The Emancipator. 



IT IS NOT PERJURY. 

The following question has been 
asked: Is it perjury to divulge the secret 
work of lodges by one who has ceased af- 
filiation with them, and has repudiated 
the whole system ? 

We will answer this one by asking 
some others. Is it forbidden in the Bi- 
ble? If so, where? Is it a violation of 
the Civil law? If so, what phase of the 
law? If neither the Civil nor Divine law 
is violated, where is the perjury? 

But, says one, is not such an one under 
oath? We would again ask, to what 
does such an oath bind one? Evidently 
nothing but the order, and that you have 
repudiated and have been expelled for so 
doing. Then has it any claims upon 
you? Has the. British Government any 
claim upon its ex-subjects who have 
come to us and have taken the American 
oath of allegiance? Has the world any 
claims upon the man who has renounced 
it and accepted Christ? 

The lodge obligation is the most per- 
nicious system of slavery ever devised by 



the arch fiend of darkness. The lodge 
would make one believe that he was eter- 
nally bound to keep its heathen obliga- 
tion, even though he is debarred from 
every possible privilege of the order, and 
he, himself, had denounced it from Al- 
pha to Omega. 

A Seceder. 
We, personally, have belonged to the 
order of Freemasons, but feel under no> 
more obligations to that order, now, than 
to one with which we were never identi- 
fied. However, we have never felt that 
expediency demanded that we make a 
show of ourself by publishing our own 
shame, but if the glory of God, or the 
cause of Christ demands it, we will feel 
no hesitancy in opening it from A to Z. 
Neither will we feel perjured by so do- 
ing. 

■ — Editorial in Beacon Light, Fordyce, 
Ark. 



A NEW MOVE. 

Secret Societies Organize to Help the 
Needy. 

New Brighton Pa., Feby. 22, 1908. 

At a meeting held last evening in the 
hall of S. M. Kane Lodge, No. 786, I. 
O. O. F., at Rochester, representatives 
of S. M. Kane Lodge, Apple Tree Camp,. 
No. 5, Woodmen of the World, Junction 
City Castle, No. 287, Knights of the Gold- 
en Eagle; Garfield Council, No. 114, Jun- 
ior Order United American Mechanics, 
Garfield Council, Order of Independent 
Americans and Rochester Lodge, K. of 
P., were present and organized a philan- 
thropical association to be known as the 
Rochester Secret Society Relief Associa- 
tion, and having for its aims the relief of 
the needy and destitute of the town, ir- 
respective of creed or affiliations. 

A relief committee was appointed con- 
sisting of one member of each order rep- 
resented, whose duties will consist in 
seeking out the needy, ascertaining their 
wants and reporting the same to H. W. 
Streit, chairman of the executive commit- 
tee, who will give the needy one reported 
an order on some one of the town mer- 
chants for the relief recommended. 

The expenses incurred by the society 
will be proportioned among the various 
societies comprising the association. 



June, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



63 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING T ODGES 

FOR SALE BY 

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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doeshurg, Past 
Master of ^'llf Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
■character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
.^hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
gjuracy of this work has been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 



OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings Of the order, and an analysis of each 
degree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual 
corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by ' the Sov*»re?sm Grand Lodge. Cloth, 
$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIx 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret "work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT^ 
UAL. 

Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten"' or secret work, installation, funeral 
ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter'** Degree. Warrior's Degree. Chief's 
Degree : with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 cents; 
paper, 35 cents. 



64 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



June, 1908. 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages, in cloth, $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1088 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry"— Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
gravings. The oaths, obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
cloth, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
three Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 

INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate them. 
5 cents. 

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages ; 5 cents. 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman, showing 
Masonic assault on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech ; interference with justice in 
courts, etc. 20 cents. 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
I. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
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CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

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A The 

American 

Magazine 

When John S. Phillips and his associates took charge of The 
American Magazine they made the following announcement: 

"We lire by visions . . We have a vision of a magazine ; we conceive that in it no great thing 
of human interest would go unrecorded ; that in it would be something of the best of all : — literature 
that in story and poetry refreshed the emotions and the love of life ; art that stirred anew the 
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and public events that concern us all ; new knowledge of man's achievements in the wide range of 
his devices and discoveries ; and all set forth with such zest, such knowledge, such art of expression, 
that there would be no dull line and no indifferent picture — that some glow of truth or humor or 
sentiment would play on every page, and that you would rise from reading with the mind enlivened 
and the heart refreshed and a confirmed belief that it was worth while living in this world, and 
worth while living to make it better. 

'If there be no vision the people perish.' " 

You can get an idea of how closely the editors are following their ideal by reading this incom- 
plete list of writers and subjects in coming numbers of the Magazine : 



DAVID GRAYSON 

has laid a mantle of peace over a big part of 
this country through the freshest literary prod- 
uct of the year — "Adventures in Contentment." 
Now comes "The Open Road" — a new series, just 
as wholesome and human and sweet as its prede- 
cessor. 

WILLIAM J. LOCKE 

the famous English author of "The Vagabond" 
and "The Morals of Marcus," will contribute his 
next novel, "Simple Septimus," to The American 
Magazine, beginning with the May number. It 
is a rare story of a gun inventor and a beauti- 
ful English country girl. The fascinating cor- 
ners of Europe form the background ; and the 
illustrations are by James Montgomery Flagg. 

IDA M. TARBELL 

is at work on several subjects of national import- 
ance which cannot at present be announced but 
which will appear exclusively in The American 
Magazine. 

WILLIAM ALLEN "WHITE 

the famous Kansas editor, will have an inimita- 
ble character study of Taft in the May number. 
Announcement will be made later of a very im- 
portant work which Mr. White is doing for early 
issues of The American Magazine. 

PROFESSOR WILLIAM JAMES 

whose article "The Powers of Men" In a recent 
issue of The American Magazine was the maga- 
zine feature of the year, is at work on another 
and still more interesting paper for us. 



RAY STANNARD BAKER'S 

new series, "The Color Line in the North," pre- 
sents the tragedy of the Northern Negro, the 
great unrecognized problem at our door. 

JULIAN STREET 

whose stories "The Englishman" and "The Some- 
thing of Somebody" have given much delight to 
readers of The American Magazine will contrib- 
ute more of his work to early issues. 
Other writers of short stories for The American 
Magazine are : Ellis Parker Butler, May Sin- 
clair, Venita Seibert, Mary Stewart Cutting, Jo- 
seph C. Lincoln and Octavia Roberts. 

MR DOOLEY I 

F. P. Dunne, creator of "Mr. Dooley," writes ex- 
clusively for The American Magazine. There is 
a "Dooley" article every month illustrated by 
John T. McCutcheon, the famous cartoonist. 

O. HENRY 

has come to his own in recognition. There is a 
wide sense of the fact that he is one of those 
rare artists — a great short story writer. We 
shall publish six of his stories in 1908. 

JOSEPHINE DASKAM BACON 

has written a fantastical, farcical sixty horse- 
power automobile story called "An Idyll of All 
Fool's Day," in which the wit and the rollick- 
ing humor of this writer show at their brightest. 
It appears in the April, May and June issues. 




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the year or roc a copy on all news- 
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Phillips Publishing Company, 341 Fifth Avenue 

New York City 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

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twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
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make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
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Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicago, Dl., under Act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Illustration — 'Chicago Avenue (Moody's) 

Church ". ."■ 65 

Sunday Class Initiation 65 

A Fancy Breed of Goat 66 

Fraternity Sunday 66 

Memorial Services 66 

The Ethics of Secrecy. By Rev. A. C. 

Dixon, D. D. . 67 

From Edmond Ronayne 73 

Amanda Smith's Address at Annual Meet- 
ing 74 

Joins Lodge ; May Not Live 75 

President Blanchard's Letter 75 

Masonic Head in Rome 80 

A Baptist Testimony » 81 

Cartoon — And the Public Is in Sympathy 

with the Striker 82 

"Will Watch with Interest"— War on Chi- 
cago School Fraternities 82 

"Secret (Societies and Kindred Evils" in 

High Schools 83 

Stealing a Part j6l Initiation 83 

'The World Seems Sick" 83 

Chinese Graduate of American College. . . . 83 
Letter of Pres. Charles G. Finney to Mr. 

D. II. Harrington 84 

Troi Arrested Notwithstanding Lodge In- 

. terf erence *85 

Prevalent Perjury 85 

A Text for the Master's Workers 85 

Tennessee Law to Protect Secret Orders. . 86 

Irish Caricatures SS 

The Blind Filter 88 

An Inquiry 89 

Black Hand Criminals Sentenced. 89 

Quaboag Lodge Anniversary 89 

Grand Army of the Republic. By Col. 

George R. Clarke 89 

One of the Workers 89 



News of Our Work 90 

The Des Moines, Iowa, German Baptist 

Meeting 90 

No School Fraternities in Toledo *90 

Conventions — Ohio, Michigan, Kansas City, 
New York-New Jersey, Indiana, Iowa . . 90 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter .91 

Michigan Agent's Report 92 

Agent Davidson's Report 93 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 93 

Terrible Effect Upon Children 94 

General Officers of the National Christian 
Association, and State Association Of- 
ficers 95 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

By Rev. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear pres- 
entation of the objections to all secret societies, 
and to Masonry especially, that are apparent to 
all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
ACY. 

Address of President J. Blanchard. This is 
a most convincing argument against the Lodge. 
16 pages ; 5 cents. 
A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen have 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
sure and published in pamphlet form. While ^not 
strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. A. Scarvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R* F. D. 6), a very excellent 
Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience 
sake from this order. 10 cents. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to sbow the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

" The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by fc*=President Charles G. Hnney, 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

WAS WASHINGTON A MASON? 

By President C. A. Blanchard. Forty=eight pages 
and cover. Price, 10 cents, postpaid. 

In the introduction the author says: "I have 
for years been intending to present with some care 
the relation of George Washington, General of the 
Colonial armies during the Revolutionary War, and 
first President of the United States, to Freemason- 
ry. I do not think that this duty should be longer 
delayed, and will now attempt as carefully as I 
can to discuss this question, which, from one point 
of view, is unimportant, but from another is of 
the highest interest to all thinking people." 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, JULY, 1908. 



NUMBER 3 




CHICAGO AVENUE CHURCH. 

REV. A. C. DIXON, PASTOR. 



Last month's great Republican Nation- 
al Convention recalls an interesting fact, 
that the first National Political Conven- 
tion, for the nomination to the chief of- 
fice in our country, was held by the Anti- 
Masonic party, in September, 1830, 
which convention adjourned to meet in 
Baltimore, September, 1831, the anniver- 
sary of the abduction of Capt. William 
Morgan. At this National Convention 
William Wirt was nominated for Presi- 
dent and Amos Ellmaker for Vice-Presi- 
dent. 



tike net gam 11 



1 ii '.mbership has been b it 
joo, is true," said Thomas "I: is l:;ie 
Stevens added 12,000 new members to 
the order during the year, but there was 
a falling off of 11,600, so that the net 
gain is but 400. Two hundred and eighty 
lodges have suspended in the past few 
years." 

It has been pointed out locally that at 
$75,500 lor a net gain of 400 members, 
Liie order has been paying $188.75 each* 



The News, of Grand Rapids! Mich., on 
Feb. 28th published an interview with 
Charles H. Thomas, great lieutenant 
commander of the Maccabees, in which 
lie stated : "To the best of my knowledge 
the statement that the expenses of ihe of- 
fice have been $75,503 'he last y-iv. , while 



SUNDAY CLASS INITIATION. 

A newspaper report in a Monday is- 
sue said: "The Forester's celebration^ 
yesterday, was the cause of more excite- 
ment than has happened for many a Sab- 
bath day, and justly so, for the meetings 
was one of the largest and most enthusi- 
astic ever held in this city, (her 500 
Foresters were present in the city hall."' 



CO 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1008. 



The occasion was a class initiation of al- 
most a hundred new members. The may- 
or of the city, being introduced, wel- 
comed the grand officers and members, 
•expressing also his appreciation t)f his 
•own membership in the Foresters. 



A FANCY BREED OF GOAT. 

Sunday was the day when a New En- 
gland lodge selected fifteen men to go 
and become members of what a newspa- 
joer called a burlesque order, so that, 
after returning, they could initiate others 
in the Oriental Order of Humility and 
Perfection ! How wonderful that title 
sounds, and how exquisitely it harmon- 
izes with the adjective combination, No- 
ble Grand ! All who join must first be 
Odd Fellows, as all who join the Arabic 
•order of the Mystic Shrine, in its import- 
ed form, must first be Masons. The 
Haymaker? constitute a similar society, 
.admitting none who are not also Red 
Men. 

After existing in Canada for some 
years, this humble and perfect order has 
begun to infest United States territory 
as an imported pest. 



FRATERNITY SUNDAY. 

Sunday observance is growing toward 
an observance of distinctively designated 
•days, and some questions arise that are 
•disturbing. Between customs, requests 
sent by mail, and the aggressions of 
lodges, a pastor almost begins to wonder 
what will become of his Sundays by and 
by. One of the most trying observances, 
to a pastor who is intelligently conscien- 
tious, is threatening to become general, 
if we read rightly the signs. Flowever, 
the shadow may be settling slowly, for 
Holyoke, Mass., a large manufacturing 
•city, held its sixteenth annual observance 
of Fraternity Sunday, May ioth, when 
an audience of twelve hundred met in 
the Presbyterian church. The societies 
present included the Knights of Malta 
and the Dames of Malta, Knights of 
Pythias, Masons, Odd Fellows, the De- 
gree of Rebekah, Spanish War Veterans 
and auxiliary, Manchester Unity Odd 
Fellows and Odd Ladies, Sons of Veter- 
ans and auxiliaries, the Grand Army and 
Woman's Relief Corps, Sons of St. 



George and the Daughters of St. George, 
Caledonians and Ladies of Caledonia, 
Clan McClaren and Ladies of Scotia. 

Miss Mary E. Woolley, successor, of 
Mary Lyon of sainted memory, gave the 
address on "A Modern Interpretation of 
an Ancient Teaching." It is hardly more 
startling to find these worldly and anti- 
christian organizations making a display 
in the church suggestive of Knox and 
Calvin, and the strong orthodoxy of 
Scotland and America, than to see this 
teacher involved. In some, if not most 
of these lodges, it would at the best be 
an unlawful thing condoned, if the name 
of Jesus should chance to be used; and 
to know this makes such a display seem 
incongruous. Many who attended church 
that day, when their lodge could be glori- 
fied, will likely enough attend church 
little and theater much, worship publicly 
but little if at all, yet dance in public 
places to the limit, the rest of the year. 



MEMORAL SERVICES. 

If angels ever weep it must be at such 
services as the one held not long since in 
New Brighton, Pennsylvania. It was 
like such services generally. It was a 
memorial service for the dead of the past 
year who had been members of the sa- 
loon lodge called "Eagles." The first 
prayer was by Chaplain Holt. "The ad- 
dress of the afternoon was made by Rev. 
C. L. Boring, of the United Brethren 
Church," who is a minister of the pro- 
lodge U. B. church, not the Radical. A 
Mason, who is also a Presbyterian and a 
teacher in the public schools, gave a talk 
on Fraternalism. The lodge Chaplain 
pronounced the benediction, after the 
singing of "Nearer, my God, to Thee!" 

Any one who has an intelligent appre- 
ciation of what the Eagle lodge stands 
for, and what the Christian Church 
stands for, will write over such memo- 
rial services : "What communion hath 
light with darkness ? What part hath he 
that believeth with an infidel ? What 
agreement hath the temple of God with 
idols?" 



The work of a man may be the doing 
of little things only, yet if he does them 
well his faithfulness is no little thing. 



July, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



6" 




A. C. DIXON. 

THE ETHICS OF SECRECY. 

Address delivered in Chicago, May 22. 100S, 
by ItEV. A. C. DIXON, D. D., at the Annual Meet- 
ing of the National Christian Association. 

I was twenty-five years coming- to the 
light on the question of organized se- 
crecy ; or rather, not until I was over 
twenty-five years of age did it enter my 
head that secret societies were wrong*. 
When I was a boy twelve years old, I 
was inveigled into a secret order, and I 
discovered great wickedness within it, 
and was sorry that I was in it, but attrib- 
uted the wickedness not to the secrecy, 
even indirectly, but to the characters of 
the members. 

While I was in college I joined a semi- 
secret society, was disgusted with the ini- 
tiation and so much evil in its workings, 
but it never occurred to me that secrecy 
was the cause of it. 

The first dawn of light I received was 
at a funeral in my pastorate in Asheville, 
North Carolina, when I noticed among 
the white-aproned men standing" around 
the casket and the grave, the dead sticks 
of my church — those so dead that they 
ought to have been buried, and the fact 
that they were not buried made their 
presence offensive. I mean that they 
were dead spiritually. They were the 
wealthier men, the more intelligent men, 



and with one exception, and he not much 
of an exception, the men in my church 
who didn't come to prayer-meeting, after 
whom I would put an interrogation point 
as to their piety, the men who in the 
community stood for the lowest possible 
type of spiritual life. I said to myself 
as I left that funeral, "There is some- 
thing the matter." Yet it did not dawn 
upon me clearly that secrecy was the 
cause of the trouble ; that organized se- 
crecy was sapping the life out of my* 
church and really destroying the useful- 
ness of these men. 

I went to Brooklyn and there was in- 
veigled into a secret order. I didn't 
know I was joining one — they called it a. 
mutual insurance society. I would be 
ashamed to describe the initiation. Tt 
was not as bad as I have heard described 
this afternoon, but it was just as 
foolish. When I got inside and 
found, presiding over the idiotic or- 
gies, my deacon, one of the most 
dignified in the church, and found 
him putting me through that sort of pro- 
ceeding, and some of the prominent 
church-members with him, I felt like a 
fool, and I had half a conviction that 
they felt a little the same way. I felt I 
had lost some of my influence with these- 
men by submitting to the indignities of 
that initiation — such as boys would go- 
through and laugh over, but when men 
come down to them they are certainly 
indignities, if not insults. I felt extreme* 
ly undignified and humiliated by the pro- 
ceeding, but that was not all. Before the 
first meeting was over, the chairman of 
the Annual Ball Committee made a re- 
port and informed us that the tickets for 
the public ball were there for distribu- 
tion, and each one of us was expected to 
distribute so many, and urge his friends 
to attend. ''Well, well," I thought, *T 
am in it ; I never thought I would get in- 
to a thing like this." So I did not have 
any more sense than just to get up and 
say. "I am not in the habit of attending 
public balls, I do not know how to to self 
tickets to public balls ; I believe that your 
public ball is an abomination unto heav- 
en, and I cannot advise any of the mem- 
bers of my church to go." My old dea- 
con sat there and looked at me out of 



68 



OIIIUST1AN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



the corner of his eye, as if that was a 
sort of new revelation to him. When I 
had said the same thing" perhaps a dozen 
times to individuals privately, I went 
home feeling a little twinge of con- 
science ; and I confess I did not go to 
sleep quite as early as usual that night. I 
had gotten mixed up with unbelievers, 
unequally yoked. I could not manage 
them ; they had all the yoke on their side, 
and they were just carrying me headlong 
like a blind ox yoked in with them; I 
•could not do a thing but kick and bellow, 
and I did that. 

Within a few weeks I received a nicely 
printed card, announcing a progressive 
euchre party under the auspices of that 
secret order, and inviting me and family 
and friends to come. I sat down and 
wrote: "My dear sir — I do not play pro- 
gressive euchre ; it is gambling ; and I do 
not want my family to play it. I there- 
fore return the card." I thought that 
-was the best testimony I could give. 

About three months afterwards anoth- 
er, more beautifully embossed card came, 
inviting me, and not my family, to a stag 
party. The words "stag party" were in 
quotation marks and printed in capital 
letters. I said, "What is a stag party?" 
I found, after interpretation by one who 
knew, that the stag party was a vaude- 
ville show in which women in undress 
-danced before husbands whose wives 
were at home. When I learned that, I 
sat down and wrote to the secretary of 
the lodge: "My dear sir — I don't believe 
in your balls, and I don't believe in your 
progressive euchre parties, nor your stag 
parlies ; and as I cannot influence this 
•concern for good, I offer my resigna- 
tion." 

Now the question came up: What are 
you going to do next Sunday morning? 
There is your old deacon, and there are 
twenty-five members of your church in 
that lodge — the most prominent men. 
What are you going to do ? Are you go- 
ing to compromise? Are you going to 
flinch? I said, "Lord, I started out to 
please Thee, and I told Thee at ordina- 
tion that if Thou wouldst help me, I 
would simply please Thee,, and try to 
please nobody else as long as I live." (I 
had broken that resolution once. I 



preached a sermon to please a dear old 
deacon, on the subject of women talking 
in public. He was opposed to it ; was 
about to leave the church with his 
wealthy family. I thought I could sail 
between Scylla and Chary bdis, and satis- 
fy him without repelling others, and hold 
him in the church. By skillful naviga- 
tion I ran into both Scylla and Charybdis^ 
and went down on a rock between the 
two. The man got so mad that he not 
only left my church, but left the town 
and moved from Baltimore to New York. 
I said then, "Lord, if you will excuse me 
for that, I will never do it again ; I will 
try to please Thee ever hereafter.") 
Well, the next Sunday morning after I 
sent in my resignation to the lodge, I 
came before my congregation resting up- 
on God, and in as kind tones as I could 
(I am afraid they did not sound very 
kindly) I said, "Brothers, I joined a se- 
cret society, thinking I was joining an in- 
surance society. They advertised a public 
ball and made me their agent. That or- 
der had a progressive euchre party and 
wanted me as a guest ; they got up a stag 
paity to appeal to the sensual nature of 
its members. I have resigned from that 
order, and I call upon you deacons who 
are members, and every member of this 
church, to revolutionize that thing or get 
out of it." 

They didn't do either. They stayed in 
it, as far as I know, and didn't even get 
mad. I have always felt that I did not 
quite do my duty. They just went along 
and smiled ; but I smiled too. I felt good 
on the inside; I felt I had done exactly 
wnat the Lord Jesus Christ would have 
me to do. Even yet my eyes were not 
opened. I thought there was something 
the matter with the organization of that 
secret order, but that all secret orders 
surely were not bad. I held this opinion 
until I went up to Boston. I had been 
there just a few months when a tall, gray? 
headed, gray-beardedj venerable old gen- 
tleman came around to see me ; he said, 
"I have been appointed by the committee 
of our order" — the name of the order 
was so big I cannot recall it, and his offi- 
cial title was so big I cannot speak it, and 
the list of officers was so big it would tie 
up my tongue just to try them — he said, 



July, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



GO 



""I have been authorized to invite you to 
make the anniversary address on Sun- 
day evening. We will give you the big- 
gest crowd of men you ever saw, and we 
will give you the biggest collection you 
ever had. Our last meeting was in Tre- 
mont Temple ; we gave the largest collec- 
tion that ever had been given at a 
Thanksgiving service, and we presented 
to the church a lectern worth (I believe 
he said) about six hundred dollars. We 
will give you the best time you ever 
.saw." I was getting ready to do it. I 
said, "What does your order represent ?" 
II o told me some good things it repre- 
sented. I said, "What do you want me 
to do?" "You talk about twenty min- 
utes." "And what are you going to do?" 
T asked. "We will have Mr. So and So 
crive an address and we will have our 

"band there; we will form at the hall and 
inarch to the church with our band and 
regimentals, and we would like to have 
seats reserved for several hundred of the 
prominent members ; after we have ex- 

- plained the object of the order, then you 
can speak." I said, "Are you a Chris- 
tian?''' He said, "Oh, no, I am not a 
Christian." "Ever been a Christian?"' 
"Yes," he said, "I was a member of a 

•church down in Maine twenty-five years 
ago; I have had nothing to do with it 
since. I joined the church then, but I 
soon learned that the church is not doing 
anything worth while; the secret socie- 
ties are doing it all, and there is little 
need of any church. When you speak to 

•us you will have something worth while 
to talk about." Well, well! I looked at 
him again. He struck me as a curiosity 

■on feet, a curiosity walking around. I 
said, "Look here, man, you want to make 

-my church an advertising pole for your 
society, the very object of which you tell 
me is to kill my church. I will have to 
think about that." 

1 have been thinking about it ever 
since ; T could not get over thinking about 
it, and it settled down as conviction in 
my soul, that secrecy itself was at the 
'bottom of the thing, wrong in principle, 
:?.nd it made wrong good men; it turned 
them aside from deep spirituality, even 
tjfrom righteousness. 

As a result of that conversation with 



the lodge representative I made my maid- 
en address against secret orders, that 
Brother W'oolley this afternoon said he 
heard ; that was the first time I attempt- 
ed to speak on the subject in public. In 
a few months it grew on me that I ought 
to bear my testimony to my church. I 
learned that a large proportion of the 
members were members of secret orders. 
A brother told me, "If you do it you will 
deplete your congregation." A pastor, 
you know, likes a large congregation ; I 
do not remember meeting many that 
liked to scatter a crowd, and see them go 
off and never come back. I waited for 
several weeks before I had the grace to 
speak out, but one Sunday evening the 
burden was so heavy upon my heart that 
I just could not help it, and I announced 
that the next Sunday evening I would 
preach on secret societies. The people 
were all there, too. They were not there 
after that. My congregation decreased 
30 per cent, perhaps 50 per cent. The 
next Sunday there were vacant seats, but 
I tell you, God gave us the victory all the 
same. I learned this, that it takes more 
grace to talk to the backs of pews where 
people used to sit, than it does to a crowd 
of five thousand people. I had one of 
the richest experiences of my life, ham- 
mering the gospel into the backs of pews. 
In that I did just tbe best I could. There 
were, to be sure, a good many people 
there to hear, but 33 per cent of my con- 
gregation was gone for at least six 
weeks. 

Dr. Armitage of New York said that 
he preached enough gospel into the backs 
of his pews to run three theological sem- 
inaries twenty-five years. I do not know 
why he did it, but there is a real joy in 
preaching to the backs of pews and chairs 
when you have the consciousness that 
you please God. and you can hear the 
Spirit of God singing in your soul, and 
go home and sleep well without a twinge 
of conscience. 

So far as I know, we did not lose a 
single member; but I confess I was a lit- 
tle frightened after that first sermon. I 
am no hero. My first impulse, when I 
see danger coming, is to run. Now you 
think that is ignoble, perhaps, but I am 
talking the truth. I heard one of the 



ro 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



bravest soldiers in the Civil War say that 
when he entered battle the first impulse 
was to run. Zebulon Vance, who be- 
came Senator, said once, "On my first 
going into battle, I turned over a little 
brush-heap and a big rabbit ran back and 
went over the hill. I saw the little cotton 
tail going over, and I turned around and 
said, 'Go on, Molly Cottontail; if it were 
not for my reputation, I would be with 
vdu.' " 

There is no doubt about it in the 
world ; these brave old soldiers that have 
never run, some of them have trembled 
mightily. My ideal of a hero is a man 
that is scared to death and won't run ; 
who just stands up and fights for God, 
with all the strength of God. A brother, 
who was a member of a secret order, 
after the evening service which depleted 
the crowd, came up to me and said, 
"Have you got anybody to go home with 
you?" I said, "No." "Well," he said, 
"1 have a company of men here to . go 
with you for your protection." "Protec- 
tion from what?" I asked. "Well," he 
said, "you had better let them go with 
you." He knew ; he was a member of a 
secret order, and he knew what secrecy 
did and what secrecy would do ; and he 
was afraid for me. I was ashamed to go 
with them. I slipped off and went up a 
back street, and ran so fast that nobody 
could catch me, because I did not want 
to go home with a bodyguard. 

Thus my conviction became more set- 
tled, that there was something the matter 
with the secret orders — with organized 
secrecy. 

I was expected to conduct the funeral 
of a young lady, a member of our Bible 
School. I went around and had a little 
bit of a service, and then there were two 
or three orders present to take charge of 
the rest of the services. They went 
through a lot of tomfoolery, that did not 
mention Jesus Christ, and had no refer- 
ence to the God that I loved ; and among 
them were some as wicked people as you 
could find in that part of the city. I 
called to pay a visit of condolence after- 
wards. I said to the mother of the girl, 
"Are you a Christian ?" "No," she said. 
"Do you ever go to church?" "No, I 
am a member of nine secret societies." I 



did not know there were so many as that 
around. "Yes," she said, "I have worked 
myself up to a high position in several 
of them. I have no time for the church."' 
She would not admit that the Church of 
Christ had a place on earth. "Why/' she- 
said, "at one of our secret society anni- 
versaries, a few months ago, the subject 
of the orator was, 'The Church Effete.' " 
"Which church effete?" "Every church: 
effete ; there is no need for the church 
any more ; the secret orders are doing the 
w r ork." She said her husband was a. 
member of seven orders. Sixteen secret 
orders supported by the two ! and they 
were not wealthy people. 

I baptized a woman, the w r ife of a 
physician, who lived just around the cor- 
ner from the church. He was one of the 
eminent physicians of the community. I 
knew he hated the church, and did not 
love me. I knew he did not believe in the 
Bible. After the baptism of his wife, I 
thought I ought to call around to pay a. 
pastoral visit. I found that that mat* 
was a member of twenty-one secret or- 
ders ! He told me he was, and that he- 
was high up in several of them. A mem- 
ber of twenty-one secret societies, and he- 
hated the Church, and hated the Bible, 
and hated Christianity, with a hatred 
that was cruel. He Wed his wife, hon- 
ored her, respected her ; but he had no* 
use for the Bible, -and no use for Chris- 
tianity. He was enthusiastic on the sub- 
ject of secret societies. 

Well, I thought, it is about time I set- 
tled this matter of secrecy. So I turned 
to my Bible, and began to investigate,, 
and tried to find out the foundation. Per- 
haps my first discovery was that there 
are some things mentioned in the Bible 
that are secret, and ought to be, in the 
sense that they are private. We ought 
to go sometimes in secret — certainly not 
with a view to publicity. "Let not your 
left hand know what your right hand do- 
eth." There is, such a thing as secret: 
prayer ; you close your door and are shut 
up with God ; you pray in secret and the 
Father will reward openly. There is- 
such a thing as secret fasting; let your 
fasting be with God — between you and ; 
God, not between you and your fellows.. 
But in the cases of giving, and praying",. 



July, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



and fasting - , there is no real secrecy ; it is 
privacy, really. If you were to organize 
for the purpose of making' prayer, and 
•of fasting, and of giving, secretly, you 
would publish them by the very fact of 
your organization. 

The difference between secrecy and 
privacy is this: A home is private, but 
not secret, in the technical sense ; that is, 
you are not compelled to swear to con- 
ceal the things which take place in the 
.home. A secret organization is a so- 
ciety of men or women that have sworn 
not to divulge anything that is done, or 
revealed to them, in secret sessions. 

Things can be private without being 
-secret. There is no secret oath about 
praying, or about fasting, or about giv- 
ing, or about the family. That was the 
lirst thing that struck me. 

The next thing that struck me was 
this: that organized secrecy is opposed 
to the tenets of Christianity. Christian- 
ity is revelation, not concealment. Je- 
sus said, "I am the Light of the world." 
It is the mission of light to reveal, not to 
conceal. Jesus said that what we hear in 
secret we should proclaim upon the 
housetops. "Well," I said to myself, "if 
thav is true, no man has a right to keep 
a truth secret that is good for the world." 
No man has a right to put under lock and 
!key what is good for humanity. No man 
has a right to put into a back room, and 
just give out to a little coterie of special 
favorites, what he knows is good for ail 
men. That is sinful. It is opposed to 
ihe genius of Christianity. Christianity 
would make us good, and then teach us 
to do good to all the rest. 

And then, certainly no man has a right 
i:o keep secret what is bad, just for the 
sake of keeping it secret. If it is bad, it 
•ought to be revealed ; and i f kept secret, 
it will be to his hurt. 

Then I notice this : the spirit of caste. 
That is contrary to the genius of Chris- 
tianity. I have been reading of caste in 
India and in China, and missionaries tell 
us that the greatest obstacle to Christian- 
ity, in some heathen countries, is caste. 
A certain class of people think they are 
l>etter than other folks, and thev call on 
•each other and despise everybody else. 
The workings of secrecy are marked by 



the same spirit, the spirit of caste. You 
will find it in the public schools right 
here in Chicago now. I want to say that 
I praise God for the stand that the 
school commissioners have taken when 
they say that the secret societies shall be 
abolished in the public schools. That de- 
cision has been given lately. Our public 
schools are divided up into little cliques 
which are reproducing the Asiatic caste 
spirit. Boys and girls will not associate 
with others just because they do not be- 
long to their secret order that has some 
little pass-word and grip. That is op- 
posed to the spirit of Christianity, not 
only in the public schools, but in colleges 
and in society everywhere. 

I find another thing : that organized se- 
crecy is opposed to organized Christian- 
ity. Christ said, "Upon this rock I will 
build my church, and the gates of hell 
shall not prevail against it." The mo^t 
important organization on this earth is 
the Church of Jesus Christ. In my esti- 
mate it is more important than govern- 
ment. I mean the general organization 
of the Church. The spirit that antago- 
nizes the Church of Christ is the spirit 
of the devil ; and so far as I can see, the 
spirit of secrecy is antagonistic to organ- 
ized Christianity. Not that every man in 
a secret order is not a Christian; but if 
he remains a Christian, it will be in spite 
of the things about him. Some men have 
stamina enough to go into a secret order 
and retain their Christian convictions and 
integrity; but if they do it, it is against 
the influence that surrounds them in the 
order. 

I notice a third thing: that organized 
secrecy is opposed to free government. 
In a country where there is a tyrant rul- 
ing, where a coterie of bad people man- 
age affairs, there might be some possible 
excuse for the secret order that opposes 
tyranny; but the genius of our govern- 
ment is caught by Bartholdi — the face of 
his statue of "Liberty Enlightening the 
World" is the face of a mother. God 
does not want the light put under a bush- 
el, and he does not want any secret so- 
cieties controlling political affairs. The 
great reason given to a man why he 
should join a secret order is that it will 
help him politically, socially, and finan- 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



cially. You never heard any one say, 
''Join the secret order and you will be a 
blessing to your country, to humanity." 
No ; it is "Join the secret order and you 
will be helped by it." There is no ap- 
peal to nobility, but simply to the selfish- 
ness that would seek to get something 
out of somebody else. Organized se- 
crecy is opposed to the genius of free 
government. 

I find, in the next place, that organized 
secrecy is opposed to God's method of 
salvation. Now that may startle some. 
If you examine the books that give an 
exposure of the secret orders, you will 
find that Christ is not mentioned. That 
is the one thing that kept me out of Ma- 
sonry. 

My dear old father is a Mason, and 
when I was a boy, though he never asked 
me to join, he kept intimating that it was 
a very good thing to be in the Masonic 
lodge. I don't think that he has attend- 
ed a lodge for thirty-five or forty years ; 
he is one of the silent sort. There are a 
good many of the silent sort, who have 
taken a wicked oath and think now that 
it is better to be silent and not to break 
their oath. I tell you, when you take an 
oath on the devil's altar you would bet- 
ter break it just as quick as you can, and 
take the oath upon God's altar. An oath 
to do a wicked thing is in itself wicked, 
and the sooner you break a wicked oath 
all to pieces the more it pleases God. I 
believe that Charles G. Finney did the 
right thing. When he got into Masonry 
and found it was wrong, he came out 
and exposed it, and protested against it, 
in the name of God. I believe it is right 
for a man to break a contract with hell 
just as soon as possible, and to display 
it to the world. 

Secrecy is against God's way of salva- 
tion. That kept me out of Masonry. I 
learned that I could not take Jesus into 
the first degree ; and then I learned that 
I could not take Him into the second de- 
gree — there was nothing about Him 
there — and I could not take Him into the 
third degree. And then I learned that 
He is left out of all the first seven de- 
grees, in order that infidels and unbe- 
lievers may go that far in Masonry. 
Somehow I was pvst simple, enough not 



to know how to go anywhere without 
Jesus. I do not expect to go into heaven 
without Him, and there is no place on 
earth that I want to go into, where I can- 
not take Jesus Christ with me. I do not 
want to have anything to do with any- 
thing that Jesus Christ cannot occupy 
from top to bottom, and which is not ac- 
cording to Him in every fibre of its struc- 
ture. There is no salvation through the 
blood, so far as I have been able to find,, 
in secret orders. They recognize "the 
god of nature," which is not explained. 
There is no god of nature except Jesus 
Christ — "all things were made by Him y 
and without Him was not anything made 
that was made." He was in the begin- 
ning with God, and He was God, and 
when you talk about the god of nature 
without reference to Christ, you are talk- 
ing about an idol, a mythical god. Jesus 
Christ reveals the only God in the uni- 
verse, and when you have rejected Christ 
you have rejected the only real God there 
is; and if you take any other, you have 
taken an idol. 

And then I found I could not go into 
a secret order because of some of the 
oaths they administer. My, my, it makes 
your blood curdle! I read one of them 
which said that if you should reveal any- 
thing that was communicated to you, you? 
should be willing to have your tongue 
torn out and buried at low water down by 
the sea side ; and in another oath, if you 
revealed anything that was made known 
to you, you should be willing to have- 
your heart plucked out and given as a, 
prey to the fowls of the air. Well now, 
if that is business somebody has to do- 
it ; and when a secret order swears a mail 1 
that he is to have his tongue pulled out 
and his heart cut out, they expect every 
man there to do it when they tell him to ';. 
and I tell you some of them do do it, in 
substance. There is no doubt about that ; 
I am as clear on that as I -could be. I 
talked with one man about it, and he said,. 
"That doesn't mean anything. Of course 
we go through that form, but it does not 
mean anything." "It doesn't? Well, if it 
doesn't mean anything, you are guilty of 
the vilest blasphemy that a man could 
ever be guilty of — if you swear to do- 
something that is terrible and mean noth- 



July, 190S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



ing by it. If you mean what you say, 
you are a murderer; if you mean noth- 
ing, you are a blasphemer." Either case 
is not a very attractive picture. 

So I decided not to go in. I didn't see 
liow I could. 

And then again, I found that in a cer- 
tain secret order they take an oath that 
they will stand by each other in every- 
thing, murder and treason excepted. Ev- 
erything except murder and treason ! 
And then in a degree above that they 
swear that they will stand by every one 
of their members, murder and treason 
not excepted. Now I say that a society 
like that is .a menace to society, and a 
menace to the government, and a menace 
to good morals, and a menace to life, and 
a menace to everything that is true and 
pure and uplifting. 

I believe Dr. Blanchard said that God 
is working like the dew and like the light, 
manufacturing lightning. It takes light 
to make lightning. It is the light that 
lifts the clouds. It is the light that forges 
the thunderbolt. It is the dew and the 
light working together — these influences 
of prayer and education that you are 
scattering here and there — by these are 
being forged gradually thunderbolts of 
power ; and the thunderbolt falls with a 
crash, never gradually ; it does not work 
slowly, it moves with tremendous rapid- 
ity. I have been down South where the 
lightning is flashing and the thunder bel- 
lowing so you have to shut your eyes and 
it makes you tremble. It is hitting the 
saloons and hitting the saloon business, 
and the same is going to take place in 
regard to all evil institutions. I do not 
know how long it will take, but God's 
way is to work slowly, quietly — like the 
dew, like the light — until He gets His 
thunderbolt ready. There will not be anv 
evils in the millennium. I will venture 
that secret societies will be cleaned up 
ciuickly. God may be pleased to clean 
that evil up now, as He did slavery and 
as He is cleaning up the liquor business ; 
but I am willing to be patient, and be 
happy with God, who bringeth in the 
light and the dew in order that He may 
strike when the time comes. 



FROM EDMOND RONAYNE. 

Harrison, Ark., June 10, 1908. 
Mr. W. I. Phillips: 

Dear Sir: In my letter written pre- 
vious to your Convention I said that 
President Blanchard's letter had, to my 
mind, first place in the May number of 
the Cynosure, but in the June number it 
is impossible to say which takes first 
place, as it is all first and no second place 
in it. 

The Seceders' Conference was surely 
grand; and when reading over the sec- 
ond time the testimony of W. H. Boles, 
I could not keep back the tears— tears of 
sorrow and deep regret that along in the 
early 70's in Chicago I was not a Chris- 
tian, and had not the blessed privilege of 
hearing some such man as J. P. Stoddard 
or some other servant of God denounce 
and expose Freemasonry. 

I knew that there is no secret in it, but 
yet I was wedded to its lodge sociability, 
and did my best to retain my position as 
a popular and well-posted Mason. But 
the Lord cared for me, whether or no I 
cared for Him, and He graciouslv led 
me out of it in His own due time, and 
now one of my chief regrets is that since 
1875 I have not worked for Him as 
steadily and as faithfully as I ought. But 
during these fast closing days, broken in 
health and living in this heathenish 
place, I can truly say, 'The Lord is my 
Shepherd, I shall not want." Psalm 23. 

God is surely blessing and shall contin- 
ue to bless the efforts of the N. C. A., 
but the personal coming of the Lord is 
the world's only hope, "and which alone 
will destroy every evil. Oh, that He 
come soon. In Him, E. Ronayne. 

Arise and toil in Jesus' strength: 

Our God is true! fruit shall appear: 

The glories of the Upper World 
Depend on faithful labor here. 

— M. Watcrbury. 

It is no sin to be rich, but when a rich 
man hoards his treasures as a miser or 
squanders them to gratify the rlesh he 
is a sinner. 



To be near to God is life. 



The heart of all reform is the reform 
of the heart. 



74 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



AMANDA SMITH, 

the well-known colored evangelist and 
philanthropist, of Harvey, Illinois, spoke 
as follows: 

I have had two husbands. Both of 
them were members of secret orders — 

the Oddfellows 
and Freemasons. I 
was greatly in sym- 
pathy with them 
for many years. Of 
course a wife is in 
sympathy with 
what her husband 
does. A woman is 
in sympathy with 
everything that her 
husband does that 
is right, and some- 
times with things 
that are wrong, 
and that she knows 
her husband, 
were 



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- ./ ■ .■ ...■ ■:....;. ■ . ■ . 




mKp% ; - : 




■jBjpP MfT^BJB^ 




fPrf- 











AMANDA SMITH. 



he 



IS 



thought 



lodges 



are wrong, but 
you know. So I 
a great thing in those days, and I never 
would have seen differently had it not 
been that God led me by His Holy Spirit 
to seek a deeper knowledge of Himself. 
I think just in proportion as good men's 
and women's eyes are opened to the al- 
mightiness of Jesus Christ, they are wil- 
ling to let go of these other things which 
fill up their lives but which do not sat- 
isfy. 

There was a certain part of my life 
when I thought, other people joined se- 
cret societies ' and made great spreads 
(you know how my people like to do 
that), and I felt it was right to be up to 
date, with the bright regalia and all this 
kind of thing. So I allied myself with 
lodges. But when the Lord opened my 
eyes, and I began to see the ridiculous- 
ness of it, and how the Lord Jesus Christ 
could fill all your being, and take all of 
that love for show and tinsel out of it 
and put something in that was lasting 
and tangible — when I found that out, 
then I went to work to readjust myself, 
and to loosen myself, and to throw off 
some of these things that I had been tied 
by, and I found it was very difficult. I 
talked to my friends — I thought that was 
the thing to do ; I went to my society, and 
they ridiculed the idea of my leaving it. 



"The idea! Why, what do you mean? 
We are just preparing to make you some- 
big officer, and it will be such a pity, and. 
you have paid so much in, and you ought 
to go on with the society." It was very 
hard for me to make them see that I was 
honest in my convictions as to the way 
God was leading me ; they could not see 
it at all, and they really thought I was 
getting a little off my base, a little un- 
balanced. They complained about the 
way I did, and, you know, it hurt me, it 
cost me something, because many of 
these people were my dear friends, asso- 
ciated in the church with me, and in var- 
ious departments of Christian work; I 
had great respect for their honesty and 
integrity in every way, and when they 
began to cut me and kind of shun me, 
well, it was very hard. You know how 
you can do a good deal and not have to 
say anything. My, how it did hurt me I 
but I kept on believing God and follow- 
ing Him as the light came that He gave 
me, and by the help of God I got a kind 
of independence that lifted me above it r 
and I got to where, by the grace of God, 
I did not care, and I got through, and I 
got out of the whole thing. 

You know, in doing work— say for in- 
stance the work the Lord has given me to 
do lately, that is, taking care of my Col- 
ored Orphans' Home — it is surprising' 
how difficult it is to get people, especially 
men, who are not tied up with some 
lodge. I am feeling it as I never felt it 
before. When you are associated with 
people that are tied hand, foot and soul, 
it is tremendous, for it is up-hill work 
and against the wind all the time. You 
cannot feel the power of the Spirit of the 
Lord unless you are free. 

I am so glad that Jesus knows all 
about these things, that He is able to de- 
liver. I am glad that a few people see 
somewhat alike in this secret society 
question. I think this antisecrecy move- 
ment is something like the prohibition 
movement. A few years ago prohibition 
was away down the hill, rolling over, and 
crawling, and tumbling about, but it has 
got on its feet, and is running now. I am 
thankful to-day to believe that this great 
movement of antisecrecy is something 
like that. It is getting on its feet ; it will 



July, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



to 



s*et to running- after a while. I am look- 
ing for wonderful things to come to pass 
through this antisecrecy organization — 
-one of the organizations that are work- 
ing for the glory of God and the salva- 
tion of men. 

May the Lord bless the National Chris- 
tian Association. 



Contributions* 



JOINS LODGE; MAY NOT LIVE. 

Man Suffers From Injuries Sustained 
While Being Initiated. 

Xoblesville, Ind., March 23. — Charles Kas- 
sahaum, aged 21, is critically ill at his home 
near this city from blood . poisoning, the re- 
sult of an accident that occurred while he 
was being initiated into the I. O. O. F. lodge. 
During the secret work a gas pipe containing 
powder exploded. The fire shot out of the 
wrong end of the pipe, severely burning one 
of Kassabaum's legs. But little attention 
was paid to the accident at the time, but 
complications have arisen that make his re- 
covery doubtful. 

It is understood that Kassabaum was being 
carried by several men when the explosion 
occurred. The flash frightened them and 
they let the candidate fall. It is now said 
that the young man is suffering from internal 
injuries resulting from the fall. 

The above item was published in the 
Indianapolis Star of March 24, and 
again shows only too vividly how fool- 
ish, and in many cases how hazardous, 
the lodge initiation is for a candidate. 
That this is not the only case of this 
kind in the State of Indiana, or the 
worst case that has happened in an Odd 
Fellows' lodgeroom, has been proven 
more than once. The reason that not 
more of the brutal and injurious initia- 
tion work of the lodges comes to light 
in the newspapers is, because the candi- 
date is, either forcibly or "gently," per- 
suaded to keep his mouth shut. Another 
reason is because plenty of money is 
generally used to hush such things up, 
and also because the newspapers of this 
country pander and cater to the lodges 
and their works of darkness. 

If every man who applies for admis- 
sion into any lodge, be it Masonry, Odd- 
fellowship or even sensual and alcoholic 



Elkdom, knew what a fool he 
would be made, and that perhaps 
his bones might be broken and his 
body bruised, under the guise 
of initiation and admission into a grand 
and sublime organization, he would rise 
in his manhood and throw off the shack- 
les of Satanic delusion, and join hands 
with those who are seeking to open the 
eyes of our rising generations and show 
them that all this lodge business is mere 
mockery and tomfoolery and will finally 
cud up in hell. Any one who has anv 
pride for his person will not enter such 
an organization, to be blindfolded and 
maltreated with a piece of gaspipe load- 
ed with power, and be made the 
laughingstock of all his "good lodge 
brethren," but he will go to those meet- 
ings which are free and open, without 
any initiation, where the body is not in- 
jured and where the soul will be bene- 
fited. He will go to the house of the 
Lord and learn of Christ, the Savior of 
the world, in whose blood alone there is 
forgiveness and life eternal. — Rev C 
YV. Baer. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 
Growth a Slow Process. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren: 

Once more I have the privilege of ad- 
dressing you regarding the great work 
in which we are all interested. Growth 
is always, or at least usually, uncon- 
scious. This is true not only of our 
bodies, but of our souls; and not only 
of individuals, but of organizations and 
movements. The analogy between the 
physical and the spiritual is quite com- 
plete. While all growth is unconscious, 
there are alternating periods in living 
beings. For a long time we find it dif- 
ficult to see progress, and then in an 
hour, as it were, great advances are made. 
Boys and girls for a time seem as if 
they never would be anything else; and 
at last, in a few months, they shoot up 
into men and women. 

No man can fix the time when infanti- 
cide became unlawful in the highest civ- 



7G 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



ilizations. No man can tell precisely when 
it became discreditable to kill slaves, or 
to allow aged parents to die. without care. 
The whole growth of Christian civiliza- 
tion has been divided between these long 
periods of apparent moral sleep, and 
brief periods of upheaval and progress. 

The conscience of the American na- 
tion protested against slavery for more 
than one hundred years. Five years be- 
fore slavery was abolished — two years, 
even one year — no man could tell when 
it should go. There was no darker day 
for the friends of freedom in our coun- 
try than the years of '57, '58 and '59. 
Then came the great national agitation; 
and finally, before we knew it was to 
vanish, the end was at hand. 

We have another instance of the same 
sort in the present attitude of the pub- 
lic toward the liquor trade. For nearly 
one hundred years we have been prophe- 
sying against that iniquity. For the last 
dozen years we have seemed to be in 
a period of reaction. It has been a dis- 
heartening time, but the last six months 
have been a time of wonderful encour- 
agement. It has seemed as if the end 
were at hand; and we have occasion to 
anticipate not .so many years of appa- 
rently unsuccessful labor as have passed. 
Business corporations have been convert- 
ed ; great church organizations have ceas- 
ed to apologize for the liquor busi- 
ness ; they have ceased, apparently, to 
fear it as they did; it is certain that they 
speak out against it; and we have rea- 
son to hope that this infamy, with all 
its attendant evils, will shortly be a thing 

of the past. 

More than Seven Thousand. 

When Elijah was lamenting the fact 
that the prophets, aside from himself, 
were all dead, the Lord rebuked his de- 
pression and fear by saying to him, "I 
have a great number of true witnesses of 
whom you do not know." It was even 



so. They were : hidden in out-of-the-way 
places—some of them ill dens and caves 
of the earth; but they were true-hearted,, 
and when the time came they appeared 
and delivered their testimony. The great 
cause moved on. 

There came to my desk, this week, two 
papers, one printed in Philadelphia, the 
other in Boston; one devoted to the in- 
terests of the Catholic church, the other 
an advocate of evangelical Christianity 
without sectarian affiliations. Both of 
these papers contained articles ,on secret 
societies. One of them covered a full 
page and more — perhaps a page and a 
half; the other almost a page. The ar- 
ticle in the Catholic paper was a defense 
of that church against the charge that 
it was itself a vast secret society. The 
writer, who is a rather prominent clergy- 
man, denied the charge, and affirmed 
that the only real secrecy connected with 
the Catholic church had to do with the 
confessional. Incidentally he shows 
that secrecy is always evil. He distin- 
guishes clearly between the lawful pri- 
vacy of honorable living, and the unlaw- 
ful secrecy of secret organizations. He 
says that secret societies demand obedi- 
ence, and enforce it by fear. "The Heart 
zvith the Dagger Aimed at It," he says, 
is often a prominent and suggestive sym- 
bol in the halls of secret societies. It 
is this "Blind Obedience" that introduces 
a disturbing element into the government 
of men. He says that in this world there 
are but Caesar and Christ ; in other words, 
the state and the church. All must be 
subject to them; and of them it is true, 
"He that is not with me is against me." 
"The affairs of secret societies are not 
open for the investigation of either state 
or church. These societies are a law unto 
themselves." ... 

The writer speaks of the sin of Herod. 
The king swore that he would give the 
daughter of Herodias what she should 



July, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



< . 



ask. He did not dream that she would 
ask him to be a murderer; but he be- 
came one — and became one because of 
his oath. And the objectionable thing 
about his oath was, that it was liable to 
call for that crime or any other. He re- 
minds us again of the murder of Dr. 
Cronin, a murder planned and executed 
by men prominent in society, men who 
would naturally shudder at the thought 
of murder, but who were made murder- 
ers by the lodge to which they be- 
longed. 

The Lodges and the Church. 
This writer speaks of the claim of the 
lodges to humanitarian work — the visit- 
ing of the sick, the burial of the dead, 
the feeding of the hungry, and the re- 
lieving of the widow and orphan. But 
quoting the advocate of the lodge to 
whom he replies, he uses this remark- 
able sentence, "How much would I give 
' if not reminded of it by my oath ?" This 
suggests one topic of my last month's 
letter, "A Compulsory Benevolence." 
That is, the writer says, "I would not 
give unless I had sworn to : because I 
have sworn to, I will." This makes the 
oath of the secret society superior to the 
law of God — superior even to the dic- 
tates of humanity. And while profess- 
ing to practice the Christian religion, and 
perhaps quoting the word of God, "Pure 
religion and undefiled before God and 
the Father is this, To visit the fatherless 
and widows in their affliction/' he direct- 
ly affirms that he would not keep this 
law, do this thing, except that his oath 
compelled him. Of- course a man who 
has this spirit in him is not a Chris- 
tian. A Christian is one who does the 
will of God from the heart. One who 
professes to do the will of God, and 
with the same breath declares that he 
would not do it unless a secret society 
had obligated him to that effect, is evi- 
dently not a Christian at all. 



Religion Does Not Amount to Anything. 

This same Catholic writer, referring 
to the Masonic friend whom he quotes, 
transcribes these words: "When a Man 
Goes Through Masonry, Religion Does 
not Amount to Anything." That is to 
say, the Christian religion does not 
amount to anything. This Masonic 
writer does not himself know that he is 
a disciple of a heathen faith, that he is 
worshiping at the altar of Satan, and that 
the very spirit which he exhibits in his 
eulogy of the lodge, shows that he has 
not the Spirit of Christ. This Catholic 
writer says very forcefully, "All that 
has ever been said against secret so- 
cieties, and all that ever will be alleged 
against them, may be summed up in 
these words of our Lord: "Men loved 
darkness rather than light, because their 
deeds were evil. For every one that 
doeth evil hateth the light, neither com- 
eth to the light, lest his deeds should be 
reproved." 

The position of this Catholic writer is 
eminently sane. Every thoughtful Pro- 
testant, who has studied the subject, 
can echo it all. And it is interesting: to 
see, as I have repeatedly reminded you, 
that in the editorial discussions and the 
newspaper articles on the subject of high 
school fraternities, every principle which 
has been affirmed bv us in the arguments 
of forty years, is declared to be unques- 
tionably true respecting the high, school 
lodges. Some persons do not seem to 
understand as yet, that the evils wrought 
by the high school societies are exactly 
like the evils wrought in other secret 
associations. But this also will be clear 
in time, and we can wait to see the case 
grow. 

Two or Three- Witnesses. 

The other article is written by a mem- 
ber of the Society of Friends — a society 
which perhaps might be considered the 
antipode of the Romish church. But 



7S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1008. 



while his article is not so long, and does 
not deal with the foundation principles 
so fully, the testimony is, on the whole, 
precisely the same. Some one had writ- 
ten to a religious weekly, inquiring as 
follows: "What opinion do Protestant 
ministers hold as to secret societies ? Do 
thev resrard them as inimical to Chris- 
tianity?" The religious weekly replied: 
* 'We cannot answer for the whole body 
of Protestant ministers. We should 
think, however, that very few regard 
them as inimical to Christianity. Many 
ministers belong to such societies and 
hold office in them. They are eminent 
and godly men, who certainly would re- 
pudiate the societies, and give up their 
membership, if they found them to be 
opposed to Christianity." 

The writer, criticising the editor, says 
he should have informed his readers that 
multitudes of ministers and of other good 
men, who had been entrapped by these 
lodges, have left them. He quotes. Pres- 
ident Charles G. Finney, of Oberlin Col- 
lege, who, speaking of his conversion, 
said : "My new life instinctively and 
irresistibly recoiled from any fellowship 
with what I then regarded as 'unfruit- 
ful works of darkness/ " He also quotes 
the great evangelist, D. L. Moody, who 
advised all Christians to get out of the 
lodge, and who said to preachers, "If 
men will not hear you because you preach 
the truth against lodges, let them go. 
God will fill their places with better 
men. W r hen they are converted they may 
return." The writer speaks of the views 
of Rev. R. A. Torrey, Rev. George C. 
Needham, Dr. Pentecost, and others, all 
of whom have repeatedly and publicly 
condemned these secret organizations. 

This gentleman, writing to the re- 
ligious weekly, was disappointed that 
the editor made no re?ly, either by pri- 
vate letter or by placing the informing 



note before his readers. The managing 
editor and proprietor was then appealed 
to, but it appears that the paper still de- 
clined to live up to its program and con- 
tinued the conspiracy against the light. 
The writer, however, in the Boston pub- 
lication quotes from a bishop of the 
Protestant Episcopal church, who wrote 

him on this subject as follows: 

"I am obliged for your letter re- . 
ceived this morning. ... I 
simply desire to say that I think 
you have discovered [in treating 
of the adaptation made of the prin- 
ciple of secrecy] a truth which has 
a great deal of influence in explain- 
ing facts which we deplore. I 
ought to state to you that / am 
myself a Freemason, although I 
have not attended a meeting or had 
anything to do with the order for 
over thirty years. I entered it 
when, as a young man, I was in - 
pursuit of other young men in the' 
interests of religion. When I com- 
plained to such young men that they 
failed to attend church, they would 
answer me, 'We already belong to 
a religious order, and we attend 
service at its Temple.' I desired 
to be able to say to them, T know 
all about that, for I am a Mason 
myself, and can tell you both how 
inferior it is to the church, and how 
inadequate is the worship.' I was 
thus able to get some influence over 
these young men, and to point 
them to something higher. ... 
As I have grozvn older, I have be- 
come rather more suspicious of all 
these orders, and it may well be 
that your dislike might be justified 
if we knew the absolute truth about 
them. / should be glad to see all 
secret orders abolished on the 
ground that they are all poor imi- 
tations of the Church of Christ, and 
are more or less inimical to its true 
progress." (Italics ours.) 
Following the letter from the bishop, 

he gives an extract from another letter 

which is equally decisive, and reads as 

follows : 



July, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



79 



"I love God's dear children of 
every name, but there are so many 
of them tied up to these Christless 
institutions. Brother, believe me, 
one of the greatest hindrances to 
our gospel preachers of to-day is, 
they are under bondage to these 
lodges. While I pray for wisdom 
from God to deal with them, and 
when to speak, yet I have no sym- 
pathy with them, and God generally 
lets me give my testimony against 
them. And yet I always pray that 
the Lord will let me do it in such 
a way that all can see it is in love. 
This world is dying for Gospel 
witnessing in love, and many of the 
saints of God are leaving them 
[the secret orders] and witnessing 
against them, yet I wish more men 
who have been delivered from them 
were brave enough to testify 
against them. Since Christ came in 
my life with the fullness of grace, 
I see so much the need of what- 
ever we do to do it in the love of 
Jesus, with a tender, compassionate 
heart." 

We ought to be thankful that so many 
good men are disposed to bear their tes- 
timony, and that they still have access 
to the public. We may rest assured that 
in due time we shall reap from all our 
sowing, if we faint not. 
A Sad Case. 

I was yesterday walking in the rain 
down Dearborn street in Chicago. As 
I was passing the Great Northern Hotel, 
a gentleman whom I did not recognize 
came up and offered his hand to me. 
I looked at him inquiringly, and he said, 
"Oh, well, you do not have to speak to 
me unless you want to, but I shouldn't 
think you would want to turn down an 
old friend this way." I said, "Pardon me, 
sir, but I do not know you." "Well," 
he said, "I know you. I have been the 
conductor on your train for eleven 
years." I said to him, "That is quite 
possible, but I do not know how that 
is. What can I do for vou?" "Well," 



he said, "I need seventy-two cents to 
pay charges on some baggage that be- 
longs to my wife. I want to get it so 
that I can go home with her. I have 
eighty-four dollars coming to me to- 
morrow, and I will come around to your 
office and give you the money." Mean- 
while he was industriously giving me the 
grip of the Master Mason. I said to 
him, "Why are you giving me this Mas- 
ter Mason's grip? Are you a Mason?" 
"Oh, yes, I am a Mason." "Well," I 
said, "I am not a Mason, and I do not 
know why you should give me this Ma- 
son's grip." "Well," he said again, 
"give me the money anyway; I need the 
money." I said, "No. You have been 
drinking, and if I should give you money 
you would drink some more. So I can- 
not give you any money." "Well," he 
said, "you can give me ten cents, any- 
way. If I had ten cents I could go 
home with my wife." I said to him, 
"That would be one whisky, or two 
beers ; and I have no right to pay money 
to the saloonkeepers. If you know me, 
you know that all my life I have been 
warring against the saioons ; and I have 
no right to take God's money and give it 
to them through you." He swore, four 
cr five times, that if I would let 
him have ten cents, he would not spend 
a penny of it for liquor, but would go 
right home. I said, "No, I do not dare 
to trust you. You are drunk now, and 
you want money to drink some more." 
I said, "Did the Masons teach you to 
drink?" "Oh, no, the Masons did not 
teach me to drink." I said, "I don't 
know. Many men learn to drink liquor 
in the lodges. Perhaps you did. But at 
all events, I do not dare to give you any 
money while you are in this condition. 
I am sorry for you, and wish that you 
might become a real Christian instead of 
a Freemason. Then you would not be 
drinking whisky." 



so 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



I was reminded by this incident of 
one which occurred in Jersey City, 
N. J., many years ago. I was lecturing in 
the Second United Presbyterian church, 
and was guest with Dr. Robert Arm- 
strong, a great-souled child of God who 
has now gone to rest. I was very fully 
and candidly reported in the Jersey City 
Evening Journal, or some paper of about 
that name. I said to Dr. Armstrong, 
"I would like to meet this reporter." He 
said, "He is a Freemason, but I will be 
glad to introduce you." Meeting him, 
I said, "I am surprised that you report 
me so intelligently and so honestly, as 
I have been told that you are a Free- 
mason." "Well," he said, "I suppose I 
am. But I don't care much for Free- 
masonry. No man has ever introduced 
himself to me as a Mason without asking 
for a quarter to get a drink." 

As I remarked in my last letter, evils 
are akin. One is naturally associated 
with another; and when we fight the 
battle which we are waging against 
lodges, we are also warring against 
liquor shops, gambling dens, brothels, 
race tracks, and all other iniquities that 
destroy the souls of men. So let us be 
of good courage, and push forward. 
Sincerely and fraternally yours, 
Charles A. Blanchard. 



MASONIC HEAD IN ROME. 

One Head for Both the Political and Re= 

ligious Masonry of the World. 

Secrecy guards the door to every 
scheme of deception. It shielded the in- 
fant rebellion in the South until it devel- 
oped into a gigantic war. Anarchists, 
assassins and thugs of every description 
are indebted to secrecy for success in 
their hideous business. "Secrecy and si- 
lence" are jewels commended to the En- 
tered Apprentice on his "first admission 
to a lodge of Freemasons." It is the 
Alpha to an ingeniou 1 ' instructed and 
thoroughly organized body of men only. 

The perfection of this system is de- 



pendent upon a single person invested 
with absolute authority to wield the en- 
tire structure. The Papacy does obei- 
sance to this law of climax by proclaim- 
ing the 'Tope, Vicar of Christ" on earth 
holding the key to heaven. It is a fixed 
law in the nature of every despotic sys- 
tem, and is readily traced in the Masonic 
order from the first to the last step in its 
progress. In the Scottish, which is the 
ruling Rite, there is not a missing link 
from the first to the thirty-third degree, 
as may be learned from its official docu- 
ments and accredited publications. 

Until a comparatively recent date the 
Supreme Council has been the Ultima 
Thule of the system, so far as known lo 
the uninitiated. An English student oi 
the mysteries has penetrated to the deep- 
er depths of the structure and there dis- 
covered the one thing needful to com- 
plete an absolute despotism. The ac- 
count given by this author bears the 
marks of authenticity as the result of 
careful and thorough research. It is too 
extended for insertion, even in abridged 
form, but the gist of the whole case is 
given in two short paragraphs, on pages 
211 and 212 in his work entitled, "The 
X Rays in Freemasonry," 1904, as fol- 
lows : 

Two Sovereigns. 

"Albert Pike, Sovereign Grand Com- 
mander of the entire ancient and accept- 
ed Scottish Rite, whose chief seat was 
at Charlestown in the United States, and 
Mazzini were in correspondence about 
the division of Masonic power. It was 
finally agreed that Albert Pike should be 
Sovereign Pontiff of Universal Masonry, 
and Mazzini Sovereign Chief of Politi- 
caL Action. This assumption of the title 
Sovereign Pontiff . * * .-* is dated 
24th Sept., 1870. * * * Andriano 
Lemmi succeeded Mazzini as Sovereign 
Chief of Political Action at Rome, and 
on the death of Albert Pike in 1891 the 
Sovereign Grand Pontificate passed from 
Charlestown to Rome." 

In the coronation of Adriano Lemmi. 
Sovereign Pontiff and Sovereign Chief 
of Political Action, the Masonic structure 
is complete and ready for action. Its en- 
tire force may be directed to any particu- 
lar point by the command of a single per- 



July, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



SI 



son, who, like the Pope, is Sovereign 
Pontiff over each and all of his loyal 
subjects. Thus it appears that a more 
perfect despotism does not exist, nor can 
a more complete instrument for enforc- 
ing- the decrees of a despot be conceived. 
It includes the political and religious field 
and covers the entire arena of human ac- 
tion. 

— Extracts from article by Rev. J. P. 
Stoddard in Home Light. 



A BAPTIST TESTIMONY. 

The editor of The Pacific Baptist, hav- 
ing been asked his opinion as to uniting 
with a secret society, replies as follows : 

"No Christian should unite with a secret 
•order, aud therefore the Christian minister 
is emphatically barred. The chief reasons 
for keeping out of such fraternities are as 
follows : , 

"1. The Christian man in the act of bap- 
tism unites himself to the only real 'fra- 
ternity' recognized of God. 'One is your 
Master, even Christ, and all ye are breth- 
ren.' 

"2. The Christian man should never take 
an oath of secrecy, as his divine Lord may 
demand of him that he divulge the nature of 
the oath. 

"8. Such organizations as, for instance, 
the Masons, use many passages of Scripture 
in their degrees, but the name of Christ is 
omitted from those that in the Bible contain 
it. It is not enough to acknowledge God. 
Christ must also be acknowledged as God, 
Saviour and King of men by the lodges be- 
fore the disciple of Christ can feel himself 
truly a 'brother.' 

' ; 4. Men who at their conversion are great- 
ly interested in lodges become less and less 
so as they grow in grace. The obligations of 
the Word of God and the duties and priv- 
ileges of the Christian life leave no corners 
for lodge meetings, ceremonies, banquets, etc. 
Imagine Paul and Peter as 'joiners'! 

"5. There is no good thing about the lodges 
that should not be incorporated into the work 
of the church. 

"6. Joining a lodge to win men to Christ 
has seldom had such a result. The way to 
win men to Christ is to join one's self to 
Christ. 

"7. Many of the lodge ceremonies violate 
the simplicity and sincerity of the Christian 
life and are pretentious, bombastic, even anti- 
biblical in teaching. 

"S. The lodges are doing a good deal to 



alleviate suffering, furnish cheap insurance, 
etc Full credit should be given them. But 
one can get as good insurance elsewhere, and 
it is the business of the Christian Church to 
care for the sick, poor, sad-hearted and the 
dying. 

"9. The various lodge 'hierarchies,' with 
their ascending degrees, swelling titles and 
childlike appeals to the imagination and 
sense of mystery, are all opposed to the dem- 
ocratic simplicity and humility required of 
Cluist's flock, where all are equal and there 
are no titles or special privileges. No, keep 
out of the lodges. But do not fight them. 
They are the best 'fraternities' that an un- 
converted man can contrive." 
— Copied into The Journal and Messenger 
(Baptist), Cincinnati, Ohio, May 28, 
1008. 

A brave testimony, and a needed one, 
but the editor strikes a false note in his 
"do not tight them." In fact, his article 
is the very opposite of his advice. It is 
a good thing to raise corn and potatoes, 
bat don't fight the weeds ! Weeds are 
the natural product of the earth, as se- 
cret societies are of the natural man. To 
be sure, weeds will choke and kill the 
corn, just as lodges do the souls of men, 
whom they bury in the grave in the hope 
of the resurrection and of heaven, while 
denying Him who is the Resurrection 
and the Life. 

No, our business is to plant corn and 
fight weeds; to build up the kingdom of 
righteousness and fight its enemies — sa- 
loons, lodgery, and other foes. Nathan- 
iel Colver, D. D., an eminent Baptist and 
a seceding Mason, said, "It (Masonry) 
is Satan's masterpiece for the destruction 
of the souls of men." Let us fight it 
with "the sword of the Spirit, which is 
the word of God." 



Often I find an article in the Cynosure 
worth more than a year's subscription 
price — if money could in any sense be 
used as a recompense for the enunciation 
of truth. Mary C. Baker. 

Whittle Springs, Tenn.. June 15, 1908. 



We may glorify God in little things, 
but no one should be content with such 
a life. The duty of every man is "to at- 
tempt great things for God." 



The saloon is the hot-bed of anarchy. 



82 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 




And the Public Is In Sympathy With the Striker. 

— From The Fort Wayne Kcics. 



WILL WATCH WITH INTEREST. 

A prominent Eastern newspaper pub- 
lished the following paragraph May 6th : 

"The war conducted by the board of ed- 
ucation of Chicago against the high school 
fraternities is to be yet more vigorously pros- 
ecuted. President Schneider has prepared 
a program to be applied in connection With 
the rule adopted prohibiting pupils from be- 
ing members of Greek letter societies, under 
the penalty of expulsion, which is to become 
effective September 1. He proposes to se- 



cure a written pledge from every member of 
a sorority or fraternity 'renouncing' the se- 
cret society in consideration of being permit- 
ted to remain in the public schools. Parents 
will be asked by the principals of the schools 
to certify in writing that their sons or daugh- 
U rs have withdrawn from the society. Mr. 
Scbneider intends to secure pledges from pu- 
pils not members that they will not join any 
secret society. School authorities all oVer 
the country will watch with interest the at- 
tempt to execute this radical program." 



July, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



83 



"KINDRED EVILS." 

Under the caption 'To Discuss Frater- 
nities," a New England daily said, in 
part, May 15th : 

"The New England Association of School 
Superintendents will convene in Boston iiext 
Friday, and from the program which is an- 
nounced for the meeting it is seen that the 
subject of secret societies in the high schools, 
a matter which has assumed prominence in 
Springfield during the past year or two, wXl 
he one of the most vital subjects considered. 
Among the speakers at the meeting will be 
Trof. Suzzallo, who will consider 'Secret 
Societies and Athletics in the High Schools.' 
A letter sent out to the superintendents of 
New England by Henry D. Hervy, of Mai- 
den, the president of the organization, says 
that the conviction is growing that the only 
way to drive secret societies and kindred 
•evils from the high schools is for the school 
authorities to recognize frankly that boys 
and girls are social beings and to make wise 
hut adequate provision for their social needs. 
The responsibility of the home must not be 
lessened, however. This is the burning topic 
which will be considered at the meeting of 
the association, and a wide expression of 
opinion is expected from superintendents 
from all over New England, as well as visit- 
ing authorities. Athletics also will not lack 
attention, and it is evident from the program 
that many restrictions on this interest of the 
pupils will be suggested." 



STEALING A PART OF INITIATION. 

President Angell ordered the dissolu- 
tion of one of the Michigan Universily 
"fraf lodges. The faculty expelled two 
members who had been arrested for theft 
and fined fifty dollars. The young men 
claimed that the thieving was a part of 
their initiation stunt. 



"THE WORLD SEEMS SICK." 

Once during her college days, Alice 
Freeman, afterward the Wellesley col- 
lege president, found it necessary to 
teach twenty weeks in a high school. In 
a letter to a college friend occurs the fol- 
lowing passage, partly relating to secret 
societies in the University of Michigan: 

"I finished yesterday just half the 
weeks I have to teach, and the ten that 
are left will pass too quickly, doubtless, 
for the work which is to be done in them ; 
but not when I think where the end of 
them will take me. Once in a while I 



dread going back to college. Not that it 
isn't far pleasanter than teaching. But 
sometimes the world seems sick. I can't 
help thinking of what you told me of the 
secret societies. God help us all ! Let us 
pray for the noble young men who are 
going down unless an arm mighty to save 
is quickly thrown around them. So S. 
has gone, too! I liked the boy so much. 
Perhaps it is better for him. But what 
a loss to the class ! Really, in a year 
there won't be much of a class left, at 
this rate. Oh, if we could only sit down 
and talk it all over !" 



At the eighteenth annual convention 
of the City and Borough Superintend- 
ents of the Pennsylvania Educational 
Association, a decided action was taken 
against the Colleges for not lessening 
the hardships of the entrance examina- 
tions while seemingly putting their faith 
in the dance hall, card parties, fraterni- 
ties and club life. 

Superintendent F. E. Downes of Har- 
risburg urged the enactment of a law re- 
moving fraternities from the lower 
schools. 



CHINESE GRADUATE OF AMERICAN 
COLLEGE. 

Something like the ordinary plea can 
be made for the Chinese secret society 
called the Hep Sing Tong, for Warry 
Charles, president of the Boston branch, 
was a graduate of an American college, 
and had been court interpreter. Nine 
members — as has been previously noticed 
— were convicted of murder. Ten mem- 
bers were known as the jury, and these 
met with the officers in a secret room. 
Charles was accused, by a witness who 
belonged to the jury at the time of the 
murders, of saying: "Since the last few 
years we are like dead ones. If you all 
agree, I'll tell my suggestion. I want 
to do as they do in New York ; we must 
kill some people. * * We want 

more members for the Hep Sing Tong. 
We will attack the people and they will 
be afraid of us. * * * The attack 
will make all Chinese men join the order. 
* * * If we can frighten the people, 
they will pay us money, and we will send 
to other branches of the society, in New 



84 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



York, Philadelphia and Chicago, for 
hatchet men who are unknown, because 
they can get away easier." 

An Associated Press dispatch, dated' 
March 27, said : "A street murder, which 
is believed to have been an outgrowth of 
the recent trials of a number of China- 
men for murder in Boston and Philadel- 
phia, intensely excited the New York 
Chinese colony for a time to-day. * * * 
Ever since the successful prosecution of 
the Chinese murder trials in Boston and 
Philadelphia, there have been frequent 
rumors, in Chinatown, that some mem- 
ber of the New York colony inspired the 
evidence which resulted in the convic- 
tions. When the shooting occurred to- 
day, it became noised about that Ing 
Alow was one of the men who had been 
under suspicion. ■* * * Three China- 
men blocked his way. There was a short, 
sharp argument, the flash and report of a 
shot, and, as Ing collapsed and fell to 
the sidewalk, the three assailants fled. 
* * * Chinatown was in a panic of ex- 
citement, and it became necessary to call 
out a big detail of extra police. * * * 
Moy Don Yuk and Wan Yon, both of 
whom live in Mott street, were taken into 
custody." 

This gives opportunity to see secret so- 
ciety arrangements in connection with 
people of a slightly different color, and 
at a somewhat different angle. The prac- 
tical difference could be greater. 



Golden, 111., April 27, 1908. 
National Christian Association, 

Chicago, 111. : 

My congregation stands as a unit 
against secretism, opposing it in every 
form whatever. They are all staunch 
German Lutherans, and with the Luther- 
an church uphold the tenets of Holy 
Scripture over against lodgeism. They 
heartily approve my stand in devoting 
special sermons against the evils of the- 
&ecret societies. 

Wishing you continued success in your 
work, I remain, 

Yours respectfully, 

(Rev.) Armin Paul Meyer. 



tutorial 



We cannot give you all of the good) 
things that remain of our Annual Meet- 
ing and Convention in this number, but 
promise you more in due time. 

We had the privilege of putting into 
type the address of President Blanchard 
which he delivered before some 6;ooo in 
Des Moines, Iowa, on June 7th, and 
sending it to about one hundred of the 
leading religious papers of our country. 
It was especially fine because of the fun- 
damental truths handled and because of 
the manner in which they were taken up. 
This is also one of the rich things in store 
for future delivery to Cynosure read- 
ers. 



The editor recently visited an old 
friend of the Association,, Mr. D. PL 
Harrington. of Columbus, Ohio. His ex- 
perience in connection with lodge-wor- 
ship reminded us of ours, when we join- 
ed the Godd Templars and found as 
Chaplain one of the most profane young 
men in the community. > . 

< A short time after Brother Harring- 
ton's initiation, a neighbor's hen-roost, 
was robbed in the night and the thief 
caught in the act. The culprit was none 
other than the Chaplain, who had given 
him moral instruction and read the pray-, 
ers over him in the lodge. 

Our readers will be very much inter- 
ested, we are sure, in the following let-, 
ter from the late President Charles G. 
Finney, of Oberlin, Ohio, written to Mr.. 
Harrington in 1873, and never hereto- 
fore published. 



Every life is a lighthouse or a beacon 
of warning. Which is yours? 



Oberlin, March 15, 1873. 
D. H. Harrington, Esq. : 

Dear Brother: Yours of the 13th in- 
stant is received. 

Your pastor a Freemason ! And does 
he defend, and co-operate with Freema- 
sons.? I often ask myself how it is pos- 
sible that a Christian can be an adhering 
Freemason,, after all the light that has 
been, shed upoh this subject. Freema- 
sonry puts out the eyes of conscience. It. 
destroys all moral discrimination, else it 



July, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



sr> 



were impossible for one to remain in 
sympathy with the lodge. 

As to your leaving the church, that 
should depend on circumstances. If the 
hody is controlled by- Freemasons and 
conducted in sympathy with their spirit, 
it is not a church of Christ, although 
there may be some good people belong- 
ing to it. If the church, as a body, ap- 
proves of the horrid oaths of Freemason- 
ry, and justifies the selfish principle by 
which Masons live, I should renounce 
their fellowship. But, if the church au- 
thorities, and the church as a body, are 
opposed to Freemasonry, I should re- 
main in it, and use all my influence 
against Freemasonry. 

As to the minister, I should deal plain- 
ly with him before I refused to support 
him. But after reasonable labor with 
him, if he still clave to the lodge, I should 
not bid him Godspeed, or express any 
confidence in him by aiding in his sup- 
port. 

Dear brother, be Christ-like in love, 
and in firmness oppose and denounce sin 
in every form whilst personally you are 
kind to all. 

God bless you. C. G. Finney. 



The natural influence upon one's mind 
of lodge obligations to aid and assist a 
brother lodgeman is well illustrated by 
the following incident from The North 
American of Philadelphia, describing the 
arrest of a lodge member by a policeman. 

"In the meantime Sergeant Fenn was 
having trouble with Troi. The man 
fought like a wildcat, and was subdued 
only after a vigorous beating. 

" 'Save me, brothers and fellow lodge- 
members' he cried frantically, as the big 
sergeant's grip tightened about his neck 
and the Italians, with weapons drawn, 
surged around the officer. 

" 'For God's sake, sergeant,' cried a cit- 
izen, who vainly sought to gain 
Fenn's side, 'don't take that man. These 
fellows will kill you.' 

' 'Not yet, friend,' answered the police- 
man coolly, 'I'm a long way from death.' 
With one slash with his club he sent two 
would-be assailants to the asphalt, caus- 
ing the poorly constructed club to break 
with its impact upon their heads. 



" 'You'll pay dearly for this,' raged the 
frantic Troi. 'You are a marked man. 
Remember that — you're marked.' The 
next moment he had sunk into tempo- 
rary oblivion. Sergeant Finn's remnant 
of club had done its work." 



PREVALENT PERJURY. 

A New York City judge says that di- 
vorce cases are packed with perjuries; 
and another judge is quoted as saying: 
"People seem to have lost their respect 
for the sanctity of an oath, and considcr 
the solemn vow to tell the truth but a 
panoply for the more effective detail of 
matter for the side they wish to succeed. 
The time has arrived when something 
radical must be done to stem the torrent 
of perjury which is engulfing the efforts 
to administer justice in the courts of our 
community." 

Like other cities and villages, New 
York is full of people habituated to tak- 
ing oaths in lodges, and it is not to be 
assumed that all take them seriously, or 
observe them strictly. There is reason 
to question whether there is not a large 
membership that regards a lodge oath as 
an almost empty form. Taking lodge 
oaths lightly, as well as blindly, might be 
expected to cultivate a loose habit of 
mind. All oaths would thus share a ten 4 - 
dency to lose sacredness. This prevalent 
custom of swearing as cultivated by 
lodges may, therefore, partly account lor 
the increase of the crime that judges ob- 
serve. 

This is not the sole cause, yet it can 
naturally be reckoned as liable to be 
among efficient causes ; at least one oath 
is taken in each degree, and, whether 
taken lightly or not, it is taken blindly. 
Taking oaths blindly, or taking them 
lightly, is a bad habit to cultivate in 
lodges and practice in courts. 



A TEXT FOR THE MASTER'S 
WORKERS. 

What we, who have long labored, are 
now needing in order to keep up hope 
and courage, is the Christian grace of pa- 
tience. So has it been, also, from the be- 
ginning, when it was said to the disciples 
of the first century. "Ye have need of 
patience, that, after ye have done the 



s(; 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



will of God, ye might receive the prom- 
ise." Impatience cuts off work midway, 
so that nothing is perfected ; therefore, 
"Let patience have its perfect work, that 
ye may be perfect and entire, wanting 
nothing." If we want what belongs to 
the final stage of discipline, losing this 
through impatience, we fail of finished 
character; if we miss the conclusion of 
an enterprise, we attain, instead, a failure. 
The last few steps of mountain-climbing 
are the only ones that touch the summit ; 
the last year of school, alone, reaches 
graduation; in the conclusion of a busi- 
ness transaction, lies its profit. 

Dangerously strong and influential 
temptations to impatience, are various in 
origin. Physical weariness can play its 
part, disappointment is not easily over- 
come or forgotten, the sting that ingrati- 
tude or want of sympathetic comradeship 
can inflict is envenomed, and its poison is 
sometimes paralyzing or benumbing. In 
petulance, or in discouragement, effort 
that ought to be patiently matured is lia- 
ble to be relaxed or abandoned. 

Yet in due season we shall reap if we 
faint not ; your labor is not in vain in 
the Lord. No place for impatience lies 
this side the line where awaits the due 
season ; until that line is reached, labor 
does not cease to be "not in vain.'"' We 
should cling to these encouraging truths, 
with faith in the Master of the field we 
cultivate. While He has patience, we 
should ; so long as He still expects re- 
sults, we may; until He relaxes purpose 
or effort, we need not. We ought to 
reach the end with Him. 

His parable of the sower is an antidote 
to impatience, and to disappointment that 
fosters it. Some seed must fall where 
the birds will catch it away, some where 
there is not much deepness of earth, and 
some where it is choked by thorns. We 
cannot expect that ungodly men, already 
profane, will hesitate to take reckless 
lodge oaths, nor can we look to see dis- 
honest men, or scheming politicians, 
shocked by the baseness of certain secret 
obligations. Licentious men will not re- 
gret that the agreement to limit vice so 
as to exempt a few nearest relatives of 
members of one degree, leaves most of 
the world unmentioned. If they are re- 



pelled by anything, it will be that limited 
agreement. Men of the world and wom- 
en of fashion cannot be expected to have 
ears to hear appeals based on Christian 
principles. Supposed business or politi- 
cal advantage can win men, dancing and 
display attract women, and those of this 
class can hear and weigh arguments like 
these ; our arguments, based on Christian 
morals and faith, they have no ears to 
hear. W r e have not failed, though the 
great multitude throngs still the broad 
road that leads to death ; the narrow path 
is not closed. He that hath an ear will 
hear ; let us patiently lift up our voice for 
him. 

Surely shallow soil on rocky ground 
will yet remain, birds of the air will catch 
away our words, thorns will not cease to 
grow and choke our Master's truth, how- 
ever diligently we sow. Yet there is 
good ground. There also remain seven 
thousand who do not worship Baal. It 
was after two-score years that Caleb, 
whose ready and encouraging words 
seemed vain, inherited the land of the 
grape-cluster, and drove out the sons of 
Anak, who had terrified his early com- 
panions. Like him, we have need of pa- 
tience, and having patience until the due 
season, we shall receive what is prom- 
ised, for our confidence hath great rec- 
ompense of reward. 



TENNESSEE LAW TO PROTECT 
SECRET ORDERS. 

Protection By Prohibiting. 

The law enacted by the Legislature of 
Tennessee, April 15, 1907, and printed in 
the Cynosure, April, 1908, is entitled, 
"AN ACT to protect fraternal, charit- 
able, and benevolent societies, or secret 
orders, by prohibiting the publication, 
sale, or circulation, of any book, pam- 
phlet, or other instrument, purporting to 
be a copy of the secret or ritualistic work 
of any such secret organization; and to 
provide a penalty for a violation of the 
same." 

Review of the Law. 

Section 1 declares it unlawful to pub- 
lish, print, or import, or to sell or expose 
for sale, anything purporting to be a copy 
of secret or ritualistic work. 

Section 4 makes violation of Section 



July, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



87 



I a misdemeanor, for which the fine must 
be not less than ten dollars, and may 
be fifty. 

Section 5 exempts officers of secret 
orders. 

Section 2 authorizes any citizen of 
Tennessee, who is first authorized by the 
chief officer of an order, to recover one 
hundred dollars from a violator of Sec- 
tion I. Fifty dollars shall belong to the 
person suing, fifty to the State. 

Section 3 empowers any citizen, au- 
thorized as required by Section 2, to 
take away from its possessor any prop- 
erty of the kind described in Section 1. 
"Such citizen, when so authorized, shall 
have the right to enforce the provisions 
of this section by a writ of replevin." 

Section 6 says that "this act shall take 
effect from and after its passage, the pub- 
lic welfare requiring it." 

Out of Harmony With Federal Consti- 
tution. 

Public welfare was thought to require 
that the first amendment of the United 
States Constitution should guarantee 
that Congress could pass no law 
"abridging freedom of speech or of the 
press." The Constitution of Tennessee, 
adopted soon after the Civil War, may 
not have copied this clause of the Bill of 
Rights, yet any American law out of har- 
mony with it, however justifiable, seems 
extraordinary. It requires imperative 
reason. 

Section 1 is criminal law. It is com- 
pleted by Section 4, and applies to mat- 
ter copyrighted under federal law. One 
provision forbids any person to import 
matter that is obviously liable to be 
brought in by mail. Import might be 
construed to cover obtaining by mail, 
in a case of this kind. 

However, Section 2 of Article IV of 
the U. S. Constitution guarantees that 
"The citizens of each State shall be en- 
titled to all the privileges and immuni- 
ties of citizens in the several States." 
One of these must be ordinary use of 
the mails. 

Tennessee judges cannot ignore this 
in favor of the State law, for the U. S. 
Constitution and laws "shall be the su- 
preme law of the land; and the judges 
in every State shall be bound thereby, 



anything in the Constitution or laws of 
any State to the contrary notwithstand- 
ing." Moreover, all "judicial officers 
both of the United States and of the sev- 
eral States, shall be bound by oath or 
affirmation to support this Constitution." 
Decisions affecting the U. S. mails 
appear reviewable by a federal court ; 
besides, instead .of condemning, State 
judges are sworn to protect their use. 
Apparently, citizens of Tennessee still 
share the universal right to receive print- 
ed and copyrighted matter by mail. 

Section 3 is common law. Without 
such terms as unlawful, misdemeanor, 
and fine, it prescribes forfeiture and a 
method of enforcement. This might be 
many times the amount of the largest 
fine. 

At Variance With Common Law. 

In earlier common law, replevin was 
apt to be restricted to loss by theft or 
robbery, but now it includes anything 
unlawfully detained from its rightful 
owner. The plaintiff must prove right 
of possession, and prove the defendant 
to be holding wrongful possession. 

Section 3, therefore, either assumes or 
creates actual or constructive ownership. 
Per contra, it assumes absence of owner- 
ship or voids title. It does this where, 
under protection of Tennessee law, an 
ordinary business transaction has been 
effected, with exchange of value. Cre- 
ation, destruction, or transference of title, 
without consideration, is against law, 
custom, and public policy, transcending 
even the right of eminent domain. 

It is previous ownership, therefore, 
that appears to be assumed for the plain- 
tiff, and denied to the defendant. Own- 
ership cannot accrue from purchase, but 
exists in some way without. For ex- 
ample, a box of books ordered, shipped, 
and paid for,' in Chicago, is not the 
property of the purchaser to whom it is 
delivered in Nashville. Through author- 
ization of a citizen of St. Louis, it ^ is 
the property of some citizen of Nash- 
ville, to whom its arrival is a surprise, 
and who was not aware of its exist- 
ence. 

Whether goods shipped in Chicago, 
and marked, Montgomery, Ala., could 



88 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



be seized in transitu while crossing Ten- 
nessee, is a natural question. 

If, without replevin, any person should 
take the box of books from the purchas- 
er, who is here assumed not to be the 
owner, would the court construe the act 
as theft, or would the apparent thief 
only become the defendant in a case of 
replevin? 

Question for the Court. 

An important question for court de- 
cision relates to the effect of this law in 
case a book contains brief quotations 
from a ritual, but as a whole is not one 
"purporting to be a copy of the secret or 
ritualistic work." Not all antisecret lit- 
erature is ritual, or direct exposure; all 
is mailable to Tennessee, and its posses- 
sion is not made a crime in the eye of 
Tennessee law. 

An Open Door. 
Even though purchase be construed as 
criminal importation, illuminating matter 
can be mailed gratuitously from outside, 
flooding the State with light as never 
before. Moreover, no section of the law 
applies to sermons, lectures, or conversa- 
tions ; and living teachers can do what 
is forbidden to the press. Free Speech 
has survived Freedom of the Press in 
Tennessee. 



IRISH CARICATURES. 

Pat, the ignorant laborer who lived in 
a shanty, is dead and buried, his son is 
lending bar and running the city govern- 
ment, and his granddaughter is teaching 
the public school. Secret orders have 
gathered in the younger members of the 
clan, among which is the secret society 
whose members are usually called Hiber- 
nians, though a priest of their church de- 
clares that in Pennsylvania it was the Hi- 
bernians who went by the name of Moi- 
lie Maguires. The following resolution 
has been adopted by a state board of the 
order ; 

Whereas, We view with much regret and 
indignation a disposition on the part of many 
persons to slander our people, especially as 
St. Patrick's day approaches, by publication 
of indecent newspaper and magazine carica- 
tures and by exhibiting for sale at news- 
stands and stationery stores post cards that 
are grossly insultiug to and libelous of the 
Irish people, 



We, therefore, the members of the state 
board of Ancient Order of Hibernians, in 
meeting assembled at Lowell, on the ninth 
day of February, 1908, condemn the publica- 
tion and sale of such caricatures and post 
cards, and urge the officers and members of 
our order to exert every lawful and reason- 
able effort to suppress the sale and circula- 
tion of such libelous caricatures and post 
cards at all times, and particularly now, that 
the feast day of our patron saint may be 
observed with dignity instead of ridicule. 



THE BLIND FILTER. 

It is not the only difference between a 
filter and a sieve, that one is for liquids 
and the other for solids. The sieve re- 
jects what is worthless, and keeps what 
is valuable ; the filter, on the contrary, 
keeps the sediment while losing what is 
pure. It selects what it rejects, preserves 
what it loses, or enhances the worth of 
what it casts away. What it keeps with- 
in itself when its work is done, is refuse. 

In this respect the filter is like a Ma- 
sonic lodge. For the lodge, also, gath- 
ers good and bad material into itself, and 
while one stream is constantly pouring 
in, another of almost equal volume is 
flowing out. Moreover, the outflow com- 
prises intelligence and moral worth which 
cannot be retained within the dark and 
blind lodge. Like Washington, anil 
Marshall, and a multitude of wise and 
noble men, the better members tend to 
swell the outflow. Weak characters, how- 
ever, and shallow minds are retained. The 
lodge is a more natural place for the 
thoughtless who do not consider, the ig- 
norant, who without understanding are 
impressed while they cannot discrimi- 
nate, or the weak and vicious, to whose 
tastes the lodge is not uncongenial, while 
it promises a refuge to folly or wicked- 
ness. 

Clinging to the lodge, like refuse in a 
filter, these baser elements remain after 
the more intelligent and better elements 
pass out again. Hence, the lodge is like 
a filter through which a stream of mixed 
elements is forever flowing, out of 
which it catches and retains the more 
worthless while losing the best that it 
receives. 



Hospitality enlarges the soul. 



July, 100S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



89 



AN INQUIRY. 
Docs the Bible require a man who has 
assumed sinful obligations, to simply 
confess that the obligations were sinful 
and that he sinned in assuming them, or 
is he further required to make known in 
detail the nature and form of the sinful 
obligations ? What is the bearing of Le- 
viticus 5 : 4, 5, and other scriptures upon 
the point in question? Let us hear from 
a number of the Cynosure readers. 



BLACK HAND CRIMINALS SENTENCED 

For the first time in Massachusetts a 
Black Hand case has resulted in convic- 
tion. The last day of March, in the af- 
ternoon, Concetto Rizzo and Antonio Mi- 
rabito were sentenced to State prison for 
not less than six or more than ten years 
by the judge of the superior criminal 
court. February 20th they sent threaten- 
ing letters through the mail to Benjamin 
Piscopo. The court denied a motion for 
a new trial — the evidence was competent 
and sufficient in amount and character to 
justify the jury. Taking the accused at 
their own words in the letter, they were 
members of an organization formed to 
kill if demands for money were not com- 
plied with. 

Asked by the court whether he had 
anything to say upon the matter of sen- 
tence, the district attorney declared that 
the case differed widely from ordinary 
blackmail, where accusation of crime was 
threatened in order to extort money. In 
Black Hand cases the forfeit was the vic- 
tim's life. 



QUABOAG LODGE ANNIVERSARY. 

Warren, Mass., has a lodge that has 
lately reached its 50th anniversary and 
enjoyed a grand celebration. Until a 
late hour Saturday evening, the exercises 
continued with great success, the presen- 
tation of past masters' jewels being par- 
ticularly interesting. One hundred and 
twenty-five Masons were present, and 
ten of the fifteen past masters were 
present to be decorated with jewels at the 
hand of the Grand Master. The celebra- 
tion of the anniversary was continued in- 
to Sunday morning, by going into the 
Congregational church, where Rev. T. C. 
Richards preached on the subject : "The 



Temple Builders." Among the no in 
the church were seven officers of the 
Grand Lodge. Although the celebration 
proper was ended, two of the visiting 
Masons spoke Sunday evening on "The 
church and the brotherhood." A super- 
intendent of schools from another place 
presided in the church Sunday evening, 
and the speakers were the grand lecturer, 
and the district deputy grand master, 
who is also principal of a normal school. 
Thus the church was extensively util- 
ized that Lord's Dav, in the interest of 
an order that makes a specialty of dis- 
honoring the name of Him for whom 
both house and dav were named. 



GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC. 

In 1889 Col. George R. Clarke, found- 
er of the "Pacific Garden Mission," of 
Chicago, a Christian worker of national 
reputation as well as an officer in the 
Civil War, speaking of his having been a 
thirty-second degree Mason and a mem- 
ber of the G. A. R., related the reasons 
for his withdrawal from all secret asso- 
ciations when he became a Christian. Of 
the G. A. R. he said: 

"For the same reason I was prevented 
from reuniting with my old comrades in 
arms in the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic. I suppose its objects are in the main 
good and calculated to help the surviving 
soldiers of the Rebellion ; but I think, 
though not as harmful as some, it is one 
of those things which stand in the way 
of the coming of Christ in the world. 
Consequently, as one loyal to the pre- 
cious Son of God who has suffered for 
lis, we must place it with all other secret 
organizations, as harmful and retarding 
the growth of our religion. Anything 
that antagonizes the coming of our Lord 
and the completing of His work ought to 
receive our opposition." 

ONE OF THE WORKERS. 

Missoula. Montana, April 15, 1 908. 
T think two young men that were 
working for us had their eyes opened by 
reading Modern Secret Societies ( which 
I had and gave to them to read), so they 
will not try the societies. 

(Mrs.) E. A. Tozier. 



90 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1008. 



Mtm of ©ttr Pori 



The Association is represented this 
year at the Christian Reformed Synod 
meeting at Muskegon, Michigan, by Mr. 
J. M. Hitchcock, so well known to the 
readers of our magazine. We anticipate 
a good note from him for the August 
number. 



THE DES MOINES, IOWA, MEETING. 

Covington, Ohio, June 18, 1908. 
W. I. Phillips, Chicago, III: 

Dear Editor of Cynosure : 

Wife and I have returned from our 
Annual Conference at Des Moines, Iowa. 
The meeting was largely attended, it be- 
ing our Bi-centennial or two hundredth 
anniversary of our organization in Amer- 
ica. There was an unusual amount of 
business, and at times the discussions 
were somewhat animated, or like that 
Conference at Jerusalem — recorded in 
Acts 15. "After much disputing" a very 
conciliatory conclusion was arrived at on 
all questions before the meeting. 

Dr. Blanchard met his appointment on 
Sunday afternoon. The Doctor seemed 
to be in shape for the occasion. He de- 
livered his message with interest and ear- 
nestness. The assembly was estimated at 
from six to eight thousand. All seemed 
to listen with absorbing interest. After 
his talk he was quickly thronged with a 
large number who wished to grasp his 
hand in friendship ; among them were a 
number with their secret badge-pins. One 
of them said, "This is my last lodge." 

The occasion was one of interest. 

Yours as ever, 

(Eld.) I. J. Rosenberger. 



In correspondence with his brother J. 
M., of this city, Mr. Thomas P. Hitch- 
cock, of Toledo, Ohio, says : "The anti- 
secret cause is attracting more attention 
to-day than at any other time since I 
was made acquainted with it. When we 
stop to think that it is taught to our chil- 
dren in the public schools, and by our 
best instructors, I can only say, Praise 
God for the hopeful prospects that are 
before us. In our City of Toledo, all 



students who insist on maintaining 
membership in these societies are de- 
prived of school privileges." 



CONVENTIONS. 

The Ohio State Convention will close 
its deliberations on June 30th, as this 
Cynosure is being printed. The public 
leaders in Pandora are wiser than some, 
and welcomed the Convention. Among 
the speakers were Rev. C. W. Oyer, Rev. 
W. J. Sanderson, Rev. J. H. T Gordon, 
Eld. I. J. Rosenberger, Rev. T. K. Leon- 
ard, and Rev. F. W. Stanton. A report 
of the Convention may be expected in 
the Aueust number. 



The Michigan State Convention will 
be held (D. V.) on October 7th and 8th, 
at Grand Rapids, in the Lagrave Street 
Christian Reformed church, Rev. Henry 
Beets, pastor. President Blanchard has 
been secured as one of the speakers. A 
great meeting is assured. 



It has been suggested that during Sep- 
tember a Conference be held in the 
Southwest — perhaps at Kansas City. 
Such a location would permit the friends 
in four States, cornering near Kansas 
City, to attend. Let us hear from those 
that are interested, about a Conference — 
say at Kansas City, on September 28th 
and 29th. 



The New York-New Jersey Conven- 
tion will be held in October. A fuller 
plan will be published in August. 



It is now the purpose, as we under- 
stand, to hold the Indiana State Conven- 
tion in November. We expect a report 
on it for the next Cynosure from Pres. 
L. G. Bears. 



How about Iowa? We hear that Pres. 
J. S. McGaw has been tendered the po- 
sition of lecturer for the National Re- 
form Association. Why not have a rally 
in northwestern Iowa, the last of this 
month — say at Sioux City? Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard would assist in such a Confer- 
ence if desired. We suggest a Citizens 9 
Conference for Aug. 24th and 25th, next. 
What do our friends in Sioux City say? 



July, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



91 



Would Rev. P. H. Tetley, of Canton, S. 
Dak., second such a Citizens' meeting, 
to take in the district comprising the cor- 
ners of the four States which meet near 
Sioux City — Iowa, Minnesota, South Da- 
kota, and Nebraska? 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., May 26, 1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips: 

I have just got in from Elerson, Ark. 
I was there the first Sunday in this 
month, but they had heard of me and 
would not let me lecture. I went back 
last Friday, to attend the sisters' Board 
Meeting. You know that was the sis- 
ters, and of course my time to talk. So 
on last Sunday I spoke to a crowded 
house, and God certainly used my mouth. 
The preacher at this place, and all the 
women and children, belong to the same 
order, so the Holy Spirit inspired me to 
tell the evils of this calf-worship. When 
I had sat down, the two preachers that 
were there (both Masons) went outdoors 
and held a council with the members of 
the church and the sinners of the lodge. 
They were angry, but the sinners said 1 
was right ; they said the preachers ought 
to keep out of lodges and preach the gos- 
pel. They said, "That woman is right. 
God did tell us not to swear, and told the 
preachers to teach us His command- 
ments ; and they don't say anything to 
us about swearing; they swear them- 
selves, just to get a little money, and then 
they don't get it until death." I had told 
them, while I was talking, that they could 
not trust God to take care of them, so 
they hired themselves out to the devil all 
their lives for three hundred dollars, to 
be paid off at death. 

• In the evening three men came to me. 
Two of them were sinners and one be- 
longed to the church. They asked me 
where I learned so much about lodges. I 
told them, and gave them some tracts. 
Then one of them said, "You don't know 
anything about the Knights of Pythias.'' 
I answered, "Are you brave?" They 
looked at each other. Then I said, "Say, 
what is this ? A good thing. Most peo- 
ple would say so. Some would. O, 
would they? No doubt." When I said 
this the whole crowd laughed, and one of 



them said, "What did you make her tell 
that for?" Then all the people at the sta- 
tion began to laugh. Then one of the 
men, a sinner, said, "Sister Woods, if 
you were a man we would hang you to a 
limb." I said, "There are men traveling 
and saying the same things that I am say- 
ing." He said, "All right, let one of the 
scoundrels come down here and we will 
kill him before the water gets hot." Then 
I said, "You see the orders make you a 
murderer." The man who belonged to 
the church said, "No, Sister Woods, we 
would not kill him, but we would chain 
him to a tree and wear two brand-new 
buggy- whips out on his naked back, and 
send him away from here on railroad 
time." He said, "We will let you talk, 
but no man had better ever come here 
with that talk." We all laughed, and I 
kept on telling their secrets until the 
train arrived. They said, "Good-bye, 
Sister Woods ; come again, and stay in 
our houses as long as you please; but no 
man had better come; if he does, we will 
string him up." 



June 12, [908. 
I was at Jefferson Springs a few days 
ago, visiting the Sisters' Union. I. lec- 
tured to a full house. My talk was alto- 
gether on the sin of secret societies. We 
had several ministers in the meeting. I 
showed them how the people who were 
in secret societies Averc spiritually dead, 
and that the preachers were the cause of 
it. I said, "These preachers who are 
preaching these annual sermons are lead- 
ing the people into the lodges, so that 
they become spiritually dead, for they 
cannot serve two masters at the same 
time." 

While I was talking I noticed that one 
of the preachers had on a Masonic pin. 
I pointed at the pin and said, "Brother, 
take that pin off and throw it away, and 
let us Christians show to the world. that 
we belong to Christ because we love one 
another." 

One of the preachers was taking note 
of all I said. He had just preached an 
annual sermon the Sunday before this 
meeting. When I sat down he got up 
and tried to help himself out, but he 
could not defend himself, for all three of 



92 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



the other ministers were on the Lord's 
side and they told that brother to stop 
trying to defend the Masons. They said., 
"You know we are all wrong. We car- 
ried the people upstairs, now let us come 
down and bring the people down ; let us 
bring them back to the Church." They 
said, "Go on. Sister Woods, with your 
books and tracts, and show us the sin of 
the lodges." They said, "God bless the 
National Christian Association, for it is 
an eye-opener." The brother that had 
on the gold Masonic pin took it off at 
once. The ministers said, "We are go- 
ing to fight the devil and bring God's 
people out of his old money-trap." 

I read in the tenth chapter of Hosea, 
the first and second verses, and proved 
to them that the lodges were idolatry. 

One of our great ministers here, Dr. J. 
B. Bolden, preached at a funeral here 
yesterday, of a woman who used to be a 
good Christian, but who went into the 
lodges and lost all interest in the church. 
She stuck to her two lodges and they put 
her body in a fine casket. Accompany- 
ing the body, the lodge-members came in, 
carrying those long sticks with black 
crape on them and a lot of little blue 
books. Dr. Bolden said, "You had bet- 
ter throw away those little blue rituals 
that men made. Whatever from the Bi- 
ble that you find in them was stolen by 
men and put there to make fools of you. 
Put the old sticks and books down, and 
get your Bibles and read them, and teach 
your children what God would have them 
do. All of you are on your way to hell." 
He looked down on their Noble Grand 
and said, "Here is your leader, an old 
sinner Noble Grand, on his way to hell, 
and you are all following him, and this 
dead woman you brought here is lost; 
she went to all your dances and card-par- 
ties, and you ought to have carried her 
straight to the cemetery." He said, 
"Here are women and men who have not 
been to a prayer-meeting this year, sit- 
ting up here with your long sticks and 
white gloves and blue rituals, wanting me 
to say this woman is in heaven, but I 
cannot say so ; she followed up all your 
dances and card-parties and moving-pic- 
ture shows, so she died like she lived. " 
He said, "I know you are hurt about 



your lodge, but it is damning you all, and 
I am God's watchman and must tell you 
of your danger; I will not compromise 
with the devil by not telling you. Go 
home and get your Bibles, and read, and 
run for your lives." 

The best thinking people are ashamed 
to have any one know that they belong to 
a lodge. God's ministers are coming out, 
and as soon as Lot comes out of Sodom 
God will consume it with the sword of 
His mouth (II. Thessalonians 2: 8). 
Yours for the work, 

(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



MICHIGAN AGENT'S REPORT. 

Brown City, Mich., June 19, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure — After the National 
Convention at Chicago, I returned to 
hold some special meetings in the North 
Muskegon M. E. Church. I preached for 
one week. Eight or ten expressed a de- 
sire publicly to lead a new life. The 
Christian people seemed greatly encour- 
aged. 

The following week I went to Hart to 
look after N. C. A. interests. I sold 
some more books, and distributed tracts. 

On Friday I came to Grand Rapids. 
In the afternoon I preached for Rev. H. 
A. Day at Walker W. M. Church, and 
at night at Grand Rapids W. M. Church. 
Both services were blessed and helpful. 

The following Tuesday and Wednes- 
day the Knights Templar of the State 
met in Grand Rapids. So on Sunday 
evening, before the sermon, I talked for 
half an hour on the history, principles 
and practices of Knights Templarism, 
which the audience appreciated. On 
Tuesday I spoke on the same subject at 
tw r o Christian Reformed schools. It was 
surprising to see the interest in and un- 
derstanding of secret societies, which 
some of these young folks have. I also 
gave instruction on Knight Templarism 
to two or three group meetings. The 
Cynosure re-enters the homes of two old 
subscribers, and nearly every old sub- 
scriber renewed. 

My next stopping place was Flint. Rev. 
H. Voorhess is planning to do more ag- 
gressive work against the Secret Em- 
pire. 

After an absence of more than five 



July, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



93 



months I came to Elkton once more and 
■distributed tracts and sold some books. 
Some of the preachers of this town are 
casting' their influence against the cause 
•of antisecrecy ; others are for the cause, 
but preach against nearly everything else 
imaginable, but think it best to leave the 
lodge very respectfully alone. 

Yesterday I came to Sebewaing to look 
after the Cynosure. It is difficult to get 
to speak in a great many places, but I 
scarcely fail to get some kind of antise- 
cret literature, besides tracts, into every 
place. 

The cause of antisecrecy moves slowly 
in Michigan, but it moves, nevertheless. 

Yours for righteousness, 

G. A. Pegram. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Centralia, 111., June 17, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure: Since I last wrote 
you I have attended the Baptist State 
Convention at Duquoin, 111., where I had 
the privilege of speaking. Rev. E. J. 
Fisher, of Chicago, and Rev. E. Hall, of 
Bloomington, preached powerful ser- 
mons, during which the Secret Empire 
received a severe drubbing. I secured a 
few subscriptions at each place. 

I held a ten days' meeting here at the 
Central Baptist Chinch. Secret societies 
are very strong here. Churches are not 
as well patronized, even by professed 
Christians, as they should be, at any of 
their services. It is almost impossible to 
get more than five or six at any prayer 
meeting. But the lodges are usually well 
attended at all of their meetings. I have 
secured quite a few Cynosure subscrib- 
ers here and am in hope of leavening 
this city with antisecrecy. I have dis- 
tributed quite a number of tracts, which 
has caused quite a stir in lodgedom. 

I go next week to attend the State B. 
Y. P. U. and Sunday School Convention 
at Rockport, 111., where I shall endeavor 
to give the lodge a blow. From there I 
go South. Pray God's blessings upon 
my work. Yours sincerely, 

F. James Davidson. 

,502 North Elm street, Centralia, 111. 



What you are when no one is looking 
is \\hat you are. 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

Bluflton, Ohio, June 18, 1908. 
Dear Cynosure: The month past has 
brought much work, largely centered in 
the Ohio State Convention, which we 
hold, God willing, in Pandora, "June 29th 
and 30th. 

The N. C. A. Annual Meeting was in- 
deed a season of refreshing. Though not 
quite in usual health, I enjoyed this our 
'best Annual Meeting. The opportunity 
to visit kindred at Wheaton and else- 
where was improved. 

I hastened to Ohio that I might con- 
sult with friends as to the best time and 
place for the Ohio meeting. That there 
are hundreds of places needing our meet- 
ing goes without saying. I judge we 
have made no mistake in going to Pan- 
dora. The friends who welcome us there 
are of the Swiss Mennonite faith — an in- 
dustrious, thrifty people. 

En route to this section I held meet- 
ings in the Free Methodist church, Co- 
lumbus, Ohio. This work was well sup- 
ported by both pastor and people. Rev. O." 
M. Shaw has been laboring among this 
people with good success. They are look- 
ing forward to the Annual Conference 
which comes to them this year. I was 
told some were present who had never 
listened to a discussion of the Lodge 
question, who, of course were forming 
opinions. Our good brother Harrington 
was not quite so well, but enjoying a 
bright hope for the future. His home 
was mine during my stay in the capital 
city. 

I have twice spoken, on invitation of 
the pastor of the Missionary church, 
Pandora; Ohio, to good-sized audiences 
gathered for prayer meetings. 

Leading the devotions at the Bluffton, 
Ohio, Mennonite College, I had opportu- 
nitv to meet the students and let them 
know of my mission. The college year 
just closing is reported as successful in 
many ways. 

At a meeting of the classis of the Ger- 
man Reformed church for this section I 
was given a hearing of fifteen minutes. 
There were two votes against giving me 
this hearing, the newly-elected pastor of 
Marion, Ohio, and the representative from 
his church. The representative said i.<. 



04 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1008. 



belonged to three lodges and was proud 
of it. During the discussion as to wheth- 
er I should be given a hearing the Mar- 
ion minister said I should not, because 
the Reformed church took no position on 
the lodge question. Another minister 
said that was just the reason why I 
should be heard. Dr. John Buchmann, 
pastor at New Knoxville, Ohio, said his 
church did not receive lodgemen. My 
address was in the nature Of invitation 
and information rather than discussion. 
Some hoped there would be discussion 
later. 

Last Sabbath was spent with Wesleyan 
Methodist friends at Dunkirk, Ohio. 
Some of the churches were observing 
"Flag Day." My theme in the morning 
was "The Christian Ensign." In the 
afternoon a special meeting gave oppor- 
tunity for the presentation of antisecrecy 
truth. The. baneful effects of the lodges 
are much in evidence here. Many pas- 
tors mourn the situation ; others say we 
must make the best of the situation ; 
while still others sinfully advocate the 
lodge, even claiming their work better 
than that of the church. This may be 
true of some poor, sickly organization to 
which they minister. President J. Blan- 
chard used to say, "It's a poor bird that 
destroys its own nest," yet some short- 
sighted men are doing this very thing; 
and the worst of it is, they are so blind- 
ed as to believe they are building the 
nest. Brother Omerod, pastor of the 
Wesleyan Methodist church at Dunkirk, 
is sound in the faith, and doing a good 
work, though meeting much opposition 
of course. 

I was glad to find Rev. F. W. Stanton, 
pastor of the large M. E. church at Ada, 
Ohio, on our side. He has seen much 
of the evil of the lodge. It is his inten- 
tion to address the Ohio convention. 

I have visited towns in this section too 
numerous to mention, and have been en- 
couraged in those willing to "come up to 
the help of the Lord against the mighty.'' 
If I mistake not the general feeling, the 
Ohio convention is to be blessed and to 
be a blessing to many. A good program 
is arranged. With the divine blessing, 
all will be well. There are many "Rad- 
ical" United Brethren churches in this 



section. The names of John Levington? 
and P. B. Williams are mentioned among: 
the N. C. A. workers here in other years. 
Oh, that God would stir those on the 
field to carry the banner on to greater 
victories ! It is harvest time. Let us 
gather together for the reforms. 

I go to the United Presbyterian 
church, Huntsville, Ohio, for Sabbath. 
Several lectures are arranged. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



TERRIBLE EFFECT UPON CHILDREN. 

It is an inexorable law of most all 
lodges to admit no children under the 
age of sixteen; and while fathers and 
mothers deem it expedient to belong to 
a dozen or more orders at one time, what 
can be the inevitable result of the neg- 
lected fireside and nursery during attend- 
ance at these -midnight revels? Nothing 
but the natural consequence, that these 
children who are left night after night 
until a late hour, will divert themselves 
as their own taste of pleasure dictates; 
and small wonder if the streets, or ques- 
tionable resorts, are well populated by 
lads and lassies of all ages from eight to 
sixteen, who may thus soon become fit 
subjects for the Society for Delinquent 
Children, or the Reformatory, to which 
the sad fact of the recently established 
Juvenile Court has become a judicial ne- 
cessity. 

A recent editorial in the Portland 
Oregonian makes this statement : "A de- 
linquent-child presupposes a delinquent 
parent or parents, and a wilful, evil-dis- 
posed child whose parents were delin- 
quent may become a neglected waif of 
the streets with a personality so strong 
that their vices are distinguishing traits 
of character for several generations; 
hence we see the best efforts of humani- 
tarians enlisted in the attempt to solve 
the problem of the delinquent child. . 
. . The Juvenile Court is the latest fac- 
tor that has been brought into this prob- 
lem, and humane, philanthropic, and in- 
telligent men and women are giving it 
their generous, unqualified support." 

Can a sadder picture be painted? But 
when fathers and mothers voluntarily 
stray from the delicate line of chaste 
honor, and domestic duty, and wilfully 



July, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



95 



neglect the evening fireside at home with 
the family circle, for a continuous round 
of initiation, banquets, and midnight de- 
bauches, unfit for the public eye, and 
yet protected by public opinion, and even 
legislative power, a dark cloud lowers 
over that age and nation that portends a 
surer desolation, and greater moral death, 
than physical pestilence and plague. 

Mrs. M. M. Burnap. 
Touchet, Washington. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

Of the National Christian Association for 

the Year 1908=1909. 

President — Charles A. Blanchard. 

Vice-President — John Groen. 

Ex-Officio Vice-Presidents — L. G. 
Bears, of Indiana ; J. S. McGaw, of 
Iowa ; J. W. Brink, of Michigan ; F. M. 
Foster, of New York; W. J. Sanderson, 
of Ohio; A. D. Zahniser, of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Nora E. 
Kellogg. 

General Secretary and Treasurer — 
William I. Phillips. 

Board of Directors — Charles A. Blan- 
chard, B. H. Einink, E. Breen, B. E. 
Bergesen, J. M. Hitchcock, Robert 
Clarke, George Windle, E. B. Stewart, 
Ezra A. Cook, William B. Rose, Samuei 
II. Swartz. 

Auditors — J. T. Logan, Joseph P. 
Shaw, H. F. Kletzing. 



MICHIGAN STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. J. W. Brink, 155 S. 
Terrace street, Muskegon. 

Vice President — Rev. H. G. Patterson, 
R. F. D. 5, Birmingham. 

Secretary — Rev. A. R. Merrill, 64 W. 
Ninth street, Holland. 

Treasurer — Rev. H. Voorhess, 724 
Oak street, Flint. 



OHIO STATE OFFICERS 
For 1907=1908. 

President — Rev. W. J. Sanderson, 
Cedarville. 

Vice President — Rev. J. E. Williams, 
Zanesville. 

Secretary — Rev. A. B. Dickie, Kim- 
bolton. 

Treasurer — W. T. Guffy, Zanesville. 



INDIANA STATE OFFICERS, 

1907=1908. 

President — Rev. L. G. Bears, 412 W. 
13th street, Peru. 

Vice Presidents — Rev. C. A. Mum- 
mart, Huntington ; Rev. L. H. Ebey, ; 
and Rev. D. Y. Schultz, Bible Training 
School, Fort Wayne. 

Secretary — Rev. H. C. Ingersoll, 1318 
E. Creighton avenue, Fort Wayne. 



NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY STATE 
OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. F. M. Foster, 345 W. 
29th St., New York City. 

First Vice President — Rev. D. Vander 
Ploeg, 47 Hope Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Second Vice President — Rev. K. F. 
Ohlson, 140 East 50th St., New York 
City. 

Third Vice President — Rev. H. Blews, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Secretary — Rev. G. Westenberg, 129 
4th Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

Treasurer — Rev. James Parker, 341 
Webster Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



IOWA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. J. S. McGaw, Morn- 
ing Sun, R. F. D. 

First Vice-President — Rev. H. P. 
Gray, Auburn. 

Second Vice-President — Rev. V. S. 
Jensen, Brayton, R. F. D. 1. 

Secretary — Rev. T. J. Adrian, 723 
Penn. Ave., Des Moines. 

Treasurer — Abner Branson, New 
Sharon. 



PENNSYLVANIA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. A. D. Zahnizer, of 
Blairsville. 

First Vice President — I. N. H. 
Beahm, of Elizabethtown College. 

Second Vice President — Rev. J. S. 
Martin, of New Castle. 

Secretary — Rev. O. G. Schoenlein, of 
Castle Shannon. 

Treasurer — H. C. Cassel, 2305 Ger- 
mantovvn avenue, Philadelphia. 



9fi 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



July, 1908. 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING T ODGES 

FOR SALE BY 

The National Christian Association 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois, 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION - HOW TO ORDER 

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office and express company. 

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remitted with order, and delivery of books, in good order, is then guaranteed. 

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taken (no books shipped on approval ; collection charges must be paid by customer. 

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TERMS: CASH WITH ORDER. We do not open accounts with individuals. Special discount 
to pastors of churches. 



ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of v 'liy Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the chp.acter 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchr.rd, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full -page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
.•^hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
curacy of this work has been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 



OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each 
degree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual 
corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the S^v^roio- n Grand Lodge. Cloth, 
$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIx 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
rdopted by the Supreme Lodjre of the World, with 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

Complete revised official- ritual of the Bene- 
ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 
ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter's Degree, Warrior's Degree, Chief's 
Degree ; with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 cents; 
paper, 35 cents. 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages, in cloth, $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
sis of the character of each degree. Over four 
hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
vertible proof of the correctness of the ritual. The 
work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
gravings. The oaths, obligations and lectures are 
quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
cloth, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
three Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGEEES 

OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

ARE MASONIC OATHS EINDING ON THE 

INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate them. 
5 cents. 

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 10 pages ; 5 cents* 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. II. II. Hlnman, showing 
Masonic assault on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech ; Interference with justice in 
courts, etc. 20 cents. 



REVISED REEEKAH RITUAL, LLLUS- 

TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign (irand Lodge, 
I. (). O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
tuting Rebekah Lodges, and Installation of Officers 
of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 



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CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



NATIONAL CHEISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Historical Sketch ; How the Business is Man- 
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package of 25 for 25 cents. 

EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

By Col. George R. Clarke. A Thirty-two De- 
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GRACIOUSLY DELIVERED 

rrcin Seven Secret Societies. By Rev. E. G. 
Wellesley-Wesley. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a 
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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

Rev. M. L. Haltey, a minister and evangelist 
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A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

BAPTIf T TESTIMONIES. 

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ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE. 

Secret Societies \n Relation to the Home. 
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CHURCH AND LODGE. 

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PERSONAL WORK: HOW TO SAVE CHRIS- 
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LODGE RELIGION. 

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THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
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Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
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The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
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ODDFELLOWSHIP A RELIGIOUS INSTI- 
TUTION 

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WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull. 6 pages; post- 
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CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

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WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

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God's Word or the Other Man's Conscience — 
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"Why Are There So Many -Good Men in 
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ARE INSURANCF LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

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OUGHT CHRISTIANS TO HOLD MEMBER- 
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AMERICA? 

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LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

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MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
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NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. Madison Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 




ELDER DAVID BERNARD. 

"My refusal to meet with or support the institution 
[Free Masonry] is not sufficient; I must renounce 
fealty to tne order, irrnil its secrets, opjwse its influ- 
ence, and use my exertions to destroy it, or I am guilty 
of a violation cf moral obligation." — From "Light on 
Free Masonry " by Elder David Bernard. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $ 1.00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicago, IJ1., under Act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Presidential Candidates on the Lodge 

Question i *97 

Letters to Nominees for President and 

Vice-President / *97 

Bryan Will Ride a Heal Goat 97 

Bishop Henry C. Potter Dead. *98 

Pres. C. G. Finney on 'Masonic Exposure. *98 
Small- Sized Riot at Lodge Entertainment. 98 
Appreciation of Dr. Dixon's Address. . . 98 
The Great Modern Danger is Secrecy. .. 98 

"Ideal Married Man" 99 

Hugh McCurdy, Eminent Mason, Dead.. *99 
Interesting, Important, and Encouraging 

— It Is Possible to Learn About Lodges. 99 

George T. Angel 1 on Rooseyelt. 100 

The Negro's Faithful Friend. 100 

The Bible and the Lodge. Address by 

President C. A. Blanchard 101 

Beneficence of Secret Societies Ill 

Lodge Insurance *112 

Cartoon . 113 

What Says Ronayne? A Question as to 

the Masonic Oath 114 

Charles G. Finney: August 29, 1792— 

August 16, .1875 115 

Knights of Pythias Erect a Monument. .*116 
Burden of Proof — Does It Rest on Ma- 
sonry or Antimasonry?. 116 

Obituary— R. A. Cullor 118 

News of Our Work 118 

Indiana, Attention ! 118 

W. B. Stoddard's Report 119 



Ohio Convention Minutes 120 

Agent Davidson's Report 123 

Agent Pegram's Report 124 

President Blanchard in Pennsylvania . . . *125 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter 125 

State Conferences 127 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
mon otaght to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

By Rev. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear pres- 
entation of the objections to all secret societies, 
and to Masonry especially, that are apparent to 
all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
ACY. 

Address of President J. Blanchard. This is 
a most convincing argument against the Lodge. 
16 pages; 5 cents. 
A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc., 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen have 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
sure and published in pamphlet form. While not 
strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. A. Scarvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a very excellent 
Christian gentleman, and a seceder for conscience 
sake from this order. 10 cents. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. ^5 cents. 

PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
TIES, r 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
of Christian churches to disfellowship secret so- 
cieties. 10 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris- 
tian religion. By President J. Blanchard. The 
un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
sniping Freemasons in the Christian Church. 10 
cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Browniee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by Ex-President Charles G. Finney, 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, :AUGUST, 1908. 



NUMBER 4 



As is well known to our readers, the 
nominee for President, by the Democrats 
William Jennings Bryan, is a great "join- 
er," he having followed closely in the 
footsteps of President Roosevelt. Un- 
doubtedly his membership in the Masonic 
and other lodges was inspired by political 
considerations. The presidential candi- 
date of the Prohibition party, Eugene W. 
Chafin, is said by the public press to be 
an Oddfellow, a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters, a Good 
Templar, and a member of the Sons of 
Temperance. So far as we know, the 
nominee of the Republican party, Will- 
iam Howard Taft, is the freest of any of 
the candidates from lodge affiliation. The 
only fraternities which he is said to 
have ever been a member of were the 
Psi Upsilon and the ''Skull and Bones," 
which he joined during his student days 
in Yale. 



The following letter has been sent to 
the nominees for President and Vice- 
President, of the Democratic, Prohibi- 
tion, and Republican parties : 

Dear Sir: The National Christian As- 
sociation, opposed to secret societies, is 
interested in knowing the opinions and 
practices of candidates for public office, 
respecting secret societies. 

The frightful amount of perjury in 
our courts ; the fact that we have in our 
country at this time about one hundred 
murders to every legal execution ; the 
difficulty in suppressing "grafting" and 
punishing "grafters" — all lead us to feel 
that there are secret forces at work, dis- 
turbing the normal action of government. 

The character of the Masonic oaths, 
and the tone of other secret society obli- 
gations which have been modeled after 
them, seem, to us, to explain the promo- 
tion of unworthy men to public station 



and the miscarriage of justice in our 
courts. 

We hold that men who rule over a peo- 
ple should not be under secret obligations 
to any portion of the people. We trust 
that you are quite in accord with us re- 
garding this matter ; and that your con- 
victions are such that, should you be pro- 
moted to the high office for which you 
are a candidate, there may be nothing to 
hinder a just and equitable administra- 
tion thereof. 

With sincere regards, we are respect- 
fully yours, Charles A. Blanchard, 

President. 

Wm. I. Phillips, Secretary. 



BRYAN WILL RIDE A REAL GOAT. 

Nebraskan Is to Be Initiated Into Knights 

of Aksarben at Omaha. 

Special to The Chicago Daily News. 

Lincoln, Neb., July 21. — William J. 
Bryan will ride a real goat next Monday 
night. He has accepted an invitation to 
be initiated into the Knights of Aksar- 
ben, a secret order that has charge of 
Omaha's annual fall celebration, and 
next Monday, when he expects to pass 
through on his way home from Chicago, 
has been chosen for the ceremony. 

Mr. Bryan declined an invitation to the 
initiation last night, which was celebrated 
at Lincoln night, because a visit next 
week would make a special trip unneces- 
sary. It is said that the equipment of the 
degree team includes a live goat, and a 
lot of special tricks will be prepared for 
the noted Democrat. 

All of the Nebraska Democrats who 
seek the commoner's favor in their aspi- 
rations for State nominations will be bid- 
den to the fun. 



Sometimes silence is more expressive 
than words. 



9S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



Bishop Henry C. Potter, the noted 
Episcopalian prelate, who died last month 
in Cooperstown, New York, was very 
widely known in this and other lands as 
a man of great intellectual ability, rather 
than of deep piety. He was a Mason of 
high degree, and the suggestion of boys' 
lodges, that should prepare the young for 
entrance into the Masonic order as soon 
as they reached their majority, came 
from him. How much his suggestion 
had to do with the spread of fraternities 
in high schools, we do not know. An- 
other movement inspired by, or endorsed 
by, Bishop Potter was the subway tavern 
movement, to aid the cause of temperance 
by the establishment and building up of 
a system of good saloons. The project 
was a failure. 



"1 knew that I could be under no ob- 
ligation to be guilty of a perpetual false- 
hood, and that I really made no revela- 
tion of any secret when I frankly ac- 
knowledged that that which had been 
published was a true account of the in- 
stitution, and a true expose of their 
oaths, principles, and proceedings." — C. 
G. Finney; "Freemasonry," page J. 



A SMALL SIZED RIOT. 

A New England newspaper begins its 
report of a social- fraternal affair by say- 
ing: "A small-sized riot was in prospect 
last night when the recently organized 
Hope Lodge, Degree of Honor, held its 
first entertainment in American Mechan- 
ics' hall." 

There were thirtv-two tables, but the 
room was overcrowded. The woman who 
was chairman of the committee of ar- 
rangements said : 

"I carefully explained how the players 
were to progress, but the minute the first 
hands were played out confusion reigned. 
The people in the room insisted on doing 
just the opposite to what we told them to 
do. It was an awful sight, that room. 
There was confusion everywhere and I 
had to call for help before things were 
running right again. They just simply 
wouldn't understand. They may blame 
me for being a poor manager, but I did 
the best I could." 

Asked if she played, she answered : 
"No, not there; I couldn't." 



"Later she said that she knew of one 
woman who came to the hall with a punch 
in her pocket and that when no one was 
iooking this woman punched her card and 
those of others. This made it almost im- 
possible to determine the winners of the 
prizes, she said. 'We couldn't do any- 
thing about it, anyway, and had to take 
the cards of those who had the most 
punches.' " 



APPRECIATION. 

Dear Cynosure: As I see it, the ad- 
dress before the Annual Meeting, by Dr. 
A. C. Dixon, is one of the best that has 
been in print for many years. It should 
be put in tract form forthwith, and scat- 
tered knee-deep in every church which 
harbors lodge people. Dr. Dixon has 
shown himself a man of great moral 
courage, and he deserves, as he will re- 
ceive, the hearty appreciation of every- 
body interested in the overthrow of the 
kingdom of darkness. 

Fraternally, 

(Rev. Dr.) F. M. Foster, 

New York City. 



THE GREAT MODERN DANGER 

A recent pan- Anglican conference 
which was held in London, discussed, for 
one thing, the relation of journalism to 
morals. One journalist, well known in 
America, advocated the method of writ- 
ing anonymously, which is the one ordi- 
narily used by American editorial writ- 
ers. Another journalist, whose personal 
custom it is to sign everything he writes, 
maintained the value to journalistic mor- 
als of having the final responsibility 
openly known. Whether the writing of 
an article is so or not, ownership of a 
publication should not be anonymous. He 
declared that the "great modern danger 
is secrecy," and is quoted as saying: That 
the peculiarity of modern tyranny was 
that it was all secret. Suppose you got 
"sacked," that was an act of tyranny, but 
who was responsible? It might be the 
manager or it might be worked back to 
some remote group of empire builders at 
Frankfort. That was the particular 
thing they had to fight in modern jour- 
nalism. It was the anonymity, not mere- 
ly the anonymity of the writer, but the 
anonymity of the whole thing. 



Angus:, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



99 



Direction, control, and ultimate respon- 
sibility should not be anonymous or se- 
cret. The owner can always hire some 
writer to put into form what he wishes 
said. What is important to be known 
publicly, is how the counting room of the 
paper is controlled. Ownership, at least, 
can be made known. Other secret inter- 
ests should not be hidden behind a jour- 
nal, pulling the strings of influence. The 
name of an editor can be omitted, but the 
owners, and directors of the policy, man- 
agement, and aim of a journal, should be 
known by the public that reads. Though 
a journalist remain anonymous, yet the 
journal must not. Secrecy must be elimi- 
nated. 



"IDEAL MARRIED MAN." 

"Warsaw, lncl., June 10. — The ideal mar- 
ried man lias been found. He is John Elder, 
and he lives on a farm near here. For twen- 
ty-seven years he has lavished his attentions 
upon Mrs. Elder and the children. His wife 
enumerates his good qualities in this way : — 

"He never drinks. 

"He never smokes or chews tobacco. 

"He is never extravagant. 

"He is economical, but not stingy. 

"He is seldom cross. 

"He never swears. 

"He never stays out late at night. 

"He is never jealous. 

"He is not afraid to work. 

"He always tells me where he is going. 

"He has no secrets." 

Some of these complimentary things 
could not now have been said of this 
good husband, if, a quarter of a century 
ago, he had become a joiner-brother. 
Several statements would have needed to 
be suppressed or modified, for he would 
have been liable to : ■ 

Drink, more or less, or keep company 
with drinking brothers. 

Smoke, or be saturated with the odor 
of smoking brothers. 

Be extravagant, at least in adding 
lodge dues, and banqueting or other ex- 
penses, to those legitimate ones he has 
actually had. 

Penurious, in effect — or associated 
with brothers habitually so — toward oth- 
er important interests than those covered 
by secrecy. 

He would have sworn peculiarly wick- 



ed oaths, and would have been brother 
with habitually profane men. 

Late at night he would often have re- 
turned, either from the lodge or from 
places sought by the brethren after leav- 
ing the lodge. 

He might have failed to include every 
place where he was going, when he said 
he was going to the lodge. 

Secrets he must have had, including 
such as no man ought to have ; while he 
might also have been obliged to keep the 
secrets of wicked men, given to him in 
confidence, and to be kept under the com- 
pulsion of Masonic obligation. 

He could not have been the ideal mar- 
ried man. 



One of the chief authorities on Mason- 
ic Jurisprudence, Hugh McCurdy, died 
after a long illness, in Corinna, Maine, 
July 1 6th, at the age of seventy-nine. He 
has been one of the most prominent Ma- 
sons in the country, and was once head 
of the Knights Templar. How empty 
such a life apears when it is ended ! 



INTERESTING, IMPORTANT AND EN= 
COURAGING. 

"It is possible for any one who desires 
to do so, to understand lodges, without 
uniting with them. Their public cere- 
monies, e. g., the laying of corner stones, 
the dedication of halls, the installation of 
officers, their social gatherings, and their 
burial occasions, all teach what they are. 
They have also an extensive literature, 
and persons who buy and read their 
books can learn about them. Then, too, 
in the case of all the greater orders, there 
are godly men who have revealed their, 
secret work, so that it is possible not only 
to know the history, philosophy, and re- 
ligion of lodg'sm, but also to know its 
ceremonies, obligations, and penalties." 
— "Modern Secret Societies," page 65. 



An article by Mr. J. M. Hitchcock, our 
fraternal delegate to the Synod of the 
Christian Reformed church, mooting in 
Muskegon. Michigan, awaits publication 
in the September Cynosure. 



If there is no good in our striving let 



us strive for something else. 



100 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



GEORGE T. ANGELL ON ROOSEVELT. 

The venerable but alert and wide- 
awake editor of Our Dumb Animals 
probably appreciates many things in Mr. 
Roosevelt that most of us incline to 
like, yet exceedingly disapproves what 
he points out in the paragraph or two 
that we copy from his paper. He has 
once criticised the President in a way 
that caused his paper to be cast out of 
the list used in Washington public 
schools. We call attention to this selec- 
tion partly as a criticism of a Mason by 
a Mason, and a public one. Every issue 
of the paper in which it is found con- 
tains the following standing item: 

"What do you consider, Mr. Angell, 
the most important work you do?" 

"Answer : Talking each month to the 
editors of every newspaper and maga- 
zine in North America north of Mexico, 
who in their turn talk to probably over 
sixty millions of readers." 

He hunts Roosevelt the hunter; never 
seems to find him in company with 
Agassiz or Cuvier; and evidently re- 
gards his tastes as those best gratified in 
the abattoir: — to speak plainly, his 
Roosevelt is not a naturalist but a butch- 
er. Like Mr. Long, he sees him come 
"near the heart of nature, only to put a 
bullet through it." 

Our Dumb Animals opposes war, on 
behalf of horses as well as men, and in 
March was drawn out to add the follow- 
ing word : 

"ROOSEVELT. 

"(Extract from a letter.) 'All that 
you say, Mr. Angell, about President 
Roosevelt, only makes him stronger.' 

"Answer: Then his friends ought to 
be very grateful to us, and so we will 
add now that we have no doubt in our 
mind that the Cuban war and the Philip- 
pine war, with all their cost of human 
and animal lives and enormous sacrifice 
of money, came from the fighting pro- 
pensities of President Roosevelt, and in 
the scale of impartial justice must be 
weighed against whatever good he has 
done. 

"The end of these wars has not come 
yet, and may result not only in the cost 
of enormous navies, armies, and fortifi- 
cations, but in the loss of tens — and per- 



haps hundreds— of thousands of human 
lives, and the destruction of a thousand- 
millions of dollars' worth of money and 
property, and perhaps the putting back 
of the progress of the world's civiliza- 
tion and humanity a quarter of a cen- 
tury. 

"Geo. T. Angell." 
What does Mr. Angell think of the 
effect of certain expressions and ac- 
tions, familiar to Masons, on a nature 
possessed naturally of propensities sim- 
ilar to those of the "brother" he has in 
mind. To make it extreme, would he 
go to the length of initiating some can- 
didate whom he knew to have suscep- 
tibilities only a little short of those of 
Jesse Pomeroy? How then can he think 
it a good influence even on a nature like 
that which he attributes to Roosevelt, or 
that which belongs to many of his nat- 
ural admirers ? How has he himself got 
along with words and actions suited to 
a smuggler's cave? They are repulsive, 
no doubt, to thousands less devoted to 
antagonism to similar things, or related 
things, than he is himself. His own en- 
durance of them, and inclination to rec- 
ognize them with favor, is one of those 
mysteries that perplex, not o'utsiders 
alone, but also those inside, whose feel- 
ings have not become calloused or whose 
ideas have not been twisted by the 
strange influence of Freemasonry. 



THE NEGRO'S FAITHFUL FRIEND. 

Natchez, Miss., Jany. 8, 1908. 

Someone is about to stir up a riot be- 
tween White and Black in Natchez. The 
Whites is up in arms and ready. They 
claims that the Blacks had guns in lodge 
rooms. This caused uneasiness among 
the Blacks. 

We must expect and look for just such 
things. We all want God's protection, 
but we cannot get it in lodge rooms. The 
Negro has forsaken God and are turning 
their backs on God and His house. God 
has promised to be only in the midst of 
Zion — His Church (not in the lodge). 

Praise God, His church is for me. 

Robert Burns. 
— From The Truth. 



Living for others is an imperative of 
the higher life. 



August, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



101 




C. A. BLANCHARD. 

THE BIBLE AND THE LODGE. 

Address delivered in Chicago, May 21, 1908, 
oy Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President of 
Wheaton College, before the Annual Convention 
of the National Christian Association. 

I wonder many times why there is 
nee<! of two speeches on any moral ques- 
tion. I was wondering, as I sat here, 
whether there was a man or woman in 
the house who needed anything further 
than the powerful testimony to which we 
have listened. But the Bible says, "In 
the mouth of two or three witnesses 
every word shall be established;" so I 
am ready for the witness-stand. In mor- 
als and in religion it is line upon line ; 
precept upon precept; here a little and 
there a little. That is the way the work 
goes on; and so, although I have noth- 
ing new to say to you, I have some old 
truths to repeat. 

Entirely Disloyal to the Bible. 

In taking up with you, for a little time, 
the subject of "The Bible and the 
Lodge," I remind you, in the first place, 
that the Lodge, as a system and move- 



ment in our country, is entirely disloyal 
to the Bible. 

The teaching of the Lodge as to the 
Bible is like the teaching of the Lodge 
as to God. The Lodge requires the ini- 
tiate to believe in a Supreme Being, and 
the Lodge puts on its altar a copy of 
what are believed to be sacred writings ; 
but the Lodge never says whether the 
God of the Christian, or the god of the 
pagan, is God; and the Lodge never says 
whether the Bible of the Christian, or the 
bible of the Mohammedan, or of the 
Hindu, is the Word of God. So, in the 
very beginning, when we consider the re- 
lation of the Lodge to the Bible, we find 
that the tendency of the Lodge teaching 

is to muddle the minds of men as to what 
is the Word of God. Candidates are told, 

as has been said to me over and over 

again, "We have the Bible on the altar in 

all of our lodges." Those who make this 

statement believe it to be true; but if 

they were informed as to the facts, they 

would know that it is not true. 

The teaching of the Masonic lodge is 
clear as to this matter. On the altar in 
the lodge should be placed that book 
which is believed, in the country where 
the lodge exists, to contain a revelation 
of the divine will: hence the Masonic 
law says plainly, In Christian lands a 
Christian Bible must lie on the altar; in 
Jewish lands, the Old Testament scrip- 
tures ; in Mohammedan lands, the Koran ; 
til Hindustan, or where the Brahman re- 
ligion prevails, the sacred writings of 
that religion. 

In this country, recently, a most ra- 
markable fact is said to have occurred. 
One night in a lodge on the western 
coast, there were initiated adherents of 
three different religions. In the initia- 
tion of these three men, one book of 
"holy writings" was put upon the altar 
for one ; when the second initiation came, 
that book was removed, and another 



L02 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 3908. 



placed there ; when the second candidate 
had been initiated, and the third came, 
the second book of "sacred writings" 
was removed, and still another was 

brought in. 

Now reflect that we have in this coun- 
try, at the present time, something like 
three hundred lodges, with a total mem- 
bership of something like five millions 
of men and women. These lodges are 
initiating annually something like two 
hundred thousand persons. In all these 
lodges, attended by all these millions of 
human beings, into which annually two 
hundred thousand people are be- 
ing initiated, the attitude in regard to 
the Word of God is this : We don't stand 
for the Bible, we don't stand for the 
Book of Mormon, we don't stand for the 
Koran ; we don't stand for anything ex- 
cept the "sacred writings ;" and w r e put 
on the altar, in any country, that book 
which, by the people of that country, is 
believed to contain the revelation of the 
divine will. In other words, when Free- 
masonry, and Oddfellowship, and the 
Knights of Pythias, and the other lodges 
of our country, have their way, there will 
not be one lodge-trained man, sitting in 
church, who believes, with anything like 
unquestioning faith, in the Book which 
is used by the minister for the purpose 
of selecting a text. This lodgeman will 
say, "Yes, to be sure, that Bible is be- 
lieved by this man to be a revelation from 
God; but there are other men, and other 
bibles." He knows not which is which, 
nor whether this text, that this man 
preached from, has any better authority 
than a thousand other texts that might 
be selected from other writings. He 
cannot tell. When lodgism has gotten 
through with the Bible, it will have de- 
stroyed the authority and standing of the 
Book among men ; and our Christian 
churches will have nothing to build upon 
except the opinions of the people who 



wish to be connected with them. Some 
will accept the Word of God; others will 
reject the Word: so far as lodgism is 
concerned, the state of mind of every 
man, and of every woman, in the whole 
creation, will be one of indifference as re- 
gards the revealed will of God. 

Destroys Bible Morality.. 
In the next place, with lodgism as it 
is in our country, we will, in time, not 
only have no Bible, but we shall find that 
Bible morals — the Christian morality up- 
on which we found our civilization — is 
totally destroyed. Christian morality in- 
volves two things : abstinence from the 
doing of evil, and performance of that 
which is right ; and we Christian people 
make the Word of God the foundation 
for the things which we require. Some 
one says to us, Why do you forbid this 
thing? We say, God has put His ban up- 
on it. If some one says, Why do you 
enjoin this duty? we say, Because God 
has required it in His Word. Having 
the Word of God destroyed, of course 
Christian morality must go with it. 

We find, as soon as we begin to exam- 
ine the. moral teachings of these secret or- 
ders, that Christian morality is, so far as 
lodges are concerned, totally destroyed. 
What is the essence of Christian moral- 
ity ? Simply that men shall do right, and 
shall not do wrong. What is the essence 
of lodge morality? That men shall do 
right by lodgemen, and shall not do 
wrong to lodgemen. What does the law 
of God require as to respect for the 
rights of property? "Thou shalt not 
steal." From whom? From any man. 
What does the law of the lodge require 
as to respect for the rights of property? 
Thou shalt not steal from a lodgeman, 
if thou knowest him to be a lodgeman at 
the time thou art about to steal from 
him. They put this in plain language; 
these are the very words : "I promise and 
swear that I will not cheat, wrong, nor 



Angus;, L90S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



103 



defraud a lodge of Master Masons, nor 
a brother of this degree, nor supplant 
him in any of his laudable undertakings, 
but will give him due and timely notice, 
that he may ward off approaching dan- 
ger, if in my power." "I will not know- 
ingly strike a brother Master Mason, not 
otherwise do him personal violence in an- 
ger, except it be in the necessary defense 
of my person, family, or property." To 
whom am I to give notice of approaching 
danger? My fellow lodgeman. Whom 
am I not to strike in anger? My fellow 
lodgeman. Suppose I get out of temper 
with my neighbor who is not a lodge- 
man ; what about him ? We have noth- 
ing to say about him. 

The very essence of morality is cut out 

and destroyed, as soon as lodge ideas 
have prevailed. Of course, destroying 
the Bible, we must allow to go with it the 
peculiar doctrines which come from the 
Bible. The Bible is the only book in the 
world which teaches universal morality. 
In regard to the performance of kindly 
acts to men, what does the Word of God 
say? It bids us to do good to all men, as 
we have opportunity ; especially to those 
who are of the household of faith — be- 
cause this household of faith are brothers 
in Christ Jesus, and are subject to the 
frowns and sneers and unfriendly acts 
of an unfriendly world. But to "do good 
unto all men" is the requirement of 
Christian morality. The door of every 
church like this, throughout the whole 
world, stands open week by week, and 
year by year, inviting all people, from 
East, West, North, and South ; men, 
women, and children ; those who are 
learned, and those who ' are ignorant ; 
those who profess Christianity, and those 
who make no profession of religion. Con- 
sider the immense volume of monies dis- 
tributed throughout the world, under 
church auspices, given by people in our 
own land alone — millions upon millions 



of dollars for the evangelization of men 
whose names the givers do not know ; 
whose faces their benefactors shall never 
see. Men here give money for people in 
India, for people in Africa, for people in 
China. Why? Because Christian mo- 
rality enforces this obligation. 

But the moment you go into secret so- 
cieties, you find that they forbid sins 
against lodgemen, instead of forbidding 
sins against men in general. They re- 
quire kindness to lodgemen, and near rel- 
atives of lodgemen, in place of kindness 
to all men. "I promise and swear that 
I will aid and assist all worthy distressed 
brother Master Masons, their widows 
and orphans, I knowing them to be such, 
so far as their necessities may require 
and my ability will permit without ma- 
terial injury to myself or family." We 
find, running through the whole secret 
society system, this same idea. We must 
do good to people who belong' to our 
lodge, when we know that they belong to 
our lodge; if they can give the signs and 
the grips, if they can furnish satisfactory 
evidence that they have paid their lodge 
dues and have agreed to help us in case 
of need, then we are under obligation to 
help them : otherwise we are under no 
obligation at all. 

If I had the privilege of spending 
these moments with you in an examina- 
tion of lodge charities alone, I should be 
able to show that lodgism has not lived 
up to its own doctrine. You would not 
be surprised at that, would you? because 
lodgism builds up a fictitious morality, in- 
stead of a real morality. A man who 
promises to be honest with lodgemen 
alone, will not be honest with the lodge- 
men; for the very foundation of honesty 
is taken out of his character. The man 
who promises to be benevolent simply to 
lodge people, will not be benevolent to 
lodge people; the foundation of benev- 
olence is taken out of his character, For 



104 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



the Bible is not honored. It teaches 
Christian charity; it requires justice. 
When the Bible is gone, you cannot find 
cither honesty or charity. The men who 
belong to the orders, and who rely upon 
them, would find themselves, in case of 
need, precisely where Mr. Boles,* the 
speaker who preceded me, found himself 
when he was holding that meeting down 
in Canton. He was thrown down and 
beaten by representative members of the 
very secret society of which he was a 
member. lie gave the hailing sign of 
distress. In place of recognizing it, they 
paid no attention, but went on beating 
him and seeking to take his life. This 
is precisely what is found to be true in 
regard to the whole list of duties which 
are enjoined, and offenses which are pro- 
hibited, in lodee oaths. I could verv 
easily demonstrate this if I had time. 

Opposed to the Bible Doctrines of Sin 
and Salvation. 

I wish to say further that not only do 
lodges destroy faith in the Bible as the 
Word of God, substituting for the Bible 
the "sacred writings" of any religion; 
not only do lodges destroy the whole in- 
stitution of Christian morality, putting 
into its place the lodge morality, to which 
lodge morality, even, they cannot hold 
men; but the lodges also destroy the 
Christian doctrines of sin and salvation, 
teaching what is directly opposed to the 
Word of God. 

God says that sin is the source of all 

evil, and that the only cure for sin is 

salvation. There is not a Christian church 

in the world to-day, which does not hold 

these two truths. The trouble with man 

is sin ; the cure for sin is salvation 

through Jesus Christ. 

There is not a lodge in the world which 

makes much of the fact of sin, and there 

is not a lodge in the world which makes 

anything of the doctrine of salvation as 

*Mr. W. H. Boles, lecturer and editor, and pas- 
tor of the Christian church, Christopher, Illinois. 



taught in the Word of God ; so we have 
in the lodg~e human religion simply, a 
system which is destroying faith in the 
Word of God, which is undermining and 
uprooting all Christian morality, and is 
striking at the very foundations of Chris- 
tian faith. Just so soon as men believe 
that the doctrines of the Lodge are true, 
they will come to doubt the truth of the 
doctrines of the Bible. If they believe 
the doctrines of the Lodge, they cannot 
believe the doctrines of the Church. 

But, specifically, what is the doctrine 
of the Lodge as to sin? Practically no 
doctrine at all. The very fact of sin is 
slurred. I think it would be impossible 
to find, among all the three hundred 
lodges of our country, one which clearly 
recognizes the fact of sin, the guilt of 
sin, the danger of sin, the power of sin, 
and the necessity that the power of sin 
should be broken. The Mason savs : 
"The Common Gavel is an instrument 
made use of by operative Masons to break 
off the corners of rough stones, the bet- 
ter to fit them for the builder's use ; but 
we, as Free and Accepted Masons, are 
taught to make use of it for the more no- 
ble and glorious purpose of divesting our 
hearts and consciences of all the vices 
and superfluities of life ; thereby fitting 
our minds as living stones, for that spir- 
itual building, that house 'not made with 
hands, eternal in the heavens.' " But no 
man who takes the obligation of an En- 
tered Apprentice, or Fellow-Craft, or 
Master Mason, is required to confess his 
sins, put away his sins, or trust in the 
blood of Jesus Christ for the pardon of 
his sins. Everywhere he is taught that 
if he will take -the obligations of his 
lodge, if he will listen to the voice of his 
lodge and do what it says to do, he is 
sure of eternal life in the better world. 
They call it the "grand lodge above," 
which, of course, means what we call 
heaven. Men who have lived their lives 



Angus J, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



105 



as corrupt men in the community, these 
men, dying, are buried by their lodges, 
and their friends are assured that they 
have gone straight to the "grand lodge 
above." 

If five millions of men are taught, week 
by week, in this country, that there is no 
particular taint of sin in human life ; that 
sin is a disease rather than sin ; that it is 
a misfortune rather than an offense ; that 
God is not going to deal with it very se- 
verely; that any man who can put on a 
fair outside will gti along somehow or 
other ; that he may follow his organiza- 
tion for his advantage here in this life, 
and when that ends he may be ushered 
by his lodge into the presence of God ; — 
if five millions of men are being taught, 
in three hundred different kinds of 
lodges, week by week, a doctrine like 
that, what is to become of the Christian 
Church, which bases its whole system of 
faith on this series of fact: men are sin- 
ners ; God loves men who are sinners ; 
Jesus came to die for men who are sin- 
ners ; the man who trusts in Jesus Christ 
will be saved, and the man who does not 
trust Jesus Christ will be lost, both for 
time and for eternity? 

We find the principles of the Lodge, is 
regards the Bible, antagonistic through- 
out. The Bible itself is set aside by the 
Lodge ; Christian morality is set aside by 
the Lodge ; the Christian plan of salva- 
tion is set aside by the Lodge. 

Destroys the Christian Institutions. 

The institutions which are founded up- 
on the Christian Church, in like manner, 
are destroyed, supplanted, undermined, 
and set aside by the spirit of the Lodge. 

There are three institutions which have 
sprung from Christianity, which are the 
only institutions which can claim divine 
character among men. These institu- 
tions are : the family, the church, and the 
state. 

The family is the primitive Christian 



institution. God made it and made the 
law for it ; and there is no peace, no pur- 
ity, no happiness, anywhere in this world, 
so far as home life is concerned, where 
the divine idea of the family does not 
prevail. 

Out of the family grows the church.. 
A collection of families agrees to use one 
house for the assemblage of the neigh- 
borhood, and hence a group of families 
— five, ten, twenty — band together. They 
erect an edifice like this, they appoint 
hours for assembly, and in these hours 
they gather, and in these buildings the 
Word of God is read and the doctrines 
of Christianity are taught to men. 
Churches are striking at the powers of 
darkness. Out from these churches go 
men to live holy and blessed lives, and 
to occupy a distinctive place in society. 

Out of the church grows the state. 
This institution also roots in the family, 
the primitive government having been 
the government of the father in the 
home, of the chief in the clan, thus 
leading by natural steps to the govern- 
ment of the nation by its constituted au- 
thorities. 

These three institutions — the familv, 

the church, and the state — are every one 

of them weakened and destroyed by the 

Lodge. Let me show you briefly how 

this is. 

The Family Destroyed. 

Take for example, the family. What 

is the basis of the family? Confidence 
between husband and wife. When hus- 
band and wife confide in and love one 
another truly, that provides for the chil- 
dren in the home : they love their par- 
ents, and the parents love and care for 
their children ; and out of the mutual con- 
fidence and mutual self -surrender, the 
mutual affection between husband and 
wife and between parent and child, comes 
everything which makes the difference 
between the home of a savage and the 
home of a Christian man. 



IOC 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



Now, when a man joins secret societies, 
I ask this question : What happens to his 
home ? His wife is not permitted to take 
the obligations of a Mason with him, 
though she may join the Eastern Star. 
He has access to that order ; but she can- 
not have access to his. He can drink 
freely with Masons. Every scoundrel 
politician of the town, after he has as- 
sumed the Masonic obligations, is his 
sworn brother and fellow : but when it 
comes to the wife who cares for his 
home, to the mother of his children, to 
whom he has pledged lifelong fidelity, he 
cannot discuss with her the subjects that 
he might freely discuss with these wor- 
thies. 

A man belongs to the Masons, Odd- 
fellows, Modern Woodmen, etc. What 

will be the relation of his wife to him, 
as compared with his relation to her? 
She is expected to confide in him, share 
her life with him, her inmost thought to 
be his, while a large section of his life is 
shut away from her. If she is an ordi- 
nary woman, that must produce virtual, 
if not an actual, divorce. The founda- 
tions of the family are uprooted already 
when the confidences between husband 
and wife are broken ; and this thing 
grows out of the very nature of the 
lodge. 

Let us take a look at society. I be- 
lieve that in Canada, across the line, they 
have something like four divorces each 
year, for each ten thousand people ; in 
our own country, I am afraid to say how 
many ; I believe about one hundred sixty 
to Canada's four. The marriage bond in 
the United States is weaker than in any 
other country in the world ; and the 
lodges are more powerful in the United 
States than in any other country in the 
world. Now some men may say that 
these two facts, although both may be 
true, are not necessarily connected ; but 
the moment vou come to examine the 



nature of the family organization and 
the nature of lodge organizations, you 
will see that the two propositions stated 
are essentially related. If one institution 
is to prevail, the other is to be weakened 
or destroyed. 

The Church Destroyed. 
It is precisely the same in regard to 

the church. The previous speaker has 
admirably said, if a man is giving his 
money to the lodges, he cannot give it to 
the church; if he is giving his time to 
the lodges, he cannot give it to the 
church; if he is giving his attention to 
the lodges, he cannot give it to the 
church. A greater than he said, "No 
man can serve two masters. Ye cannot 
serve God and mammon." It is a fact 
that in all towns where lodges flourish, 
churches decay; and in all towns where 
churches flourish, lodges decay. I defy 
you to find a single instance where lodges 
have grown strong and at the same time 
the churches of the same locality have 
flourished and been powerful. The na- 
tures of the two things are essentially 
antagonistic. The lodge principle is dif- 
ferent from the Bible principle. The Bi- 
ble is the foundation of the Church; the 
Bible is not the foundation of the Lodge. 
Christian benevolence is the foundation 
Of the Church; human selfishness is the 
foundation of the Lodge. Where one 
flourishes, the other must decay. This be- 
ing the fact, the weaker must go. If the 

lodge flourishes, the church is destroyed. 
Civil Government Destroyed. 

We find this same thing to be true in 

regard to civil government. A man is 
called as a witness. The judge says, "The 
witness will be sworn." He lifts his 
hand. "You do solemnly swear that you 
will tell the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth. So help you God." 
He says, "I swear it." "What is your 
name?" "My name is John Smith." 
"W T here do you live ?" He says he lives 
on Superior Street, Chicago Avenue, 



Angus:, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



107 



Clark Street — it does not matter. "Do 
you know anything- about this case?" "I 
do." "What do you know about this 
ease?" Just as this question is put to 
the witness he glances over at the man in 
the prisoner's box. The prisoner gives 
the hailing sign of distress of some secret 
order with which the witness is connect- 
ed. The witness watches him a moment, 
and sees another sign of distress for an- 
other order with which he is connected. 
In the five minutes which ensue the pris- 
oner in the box has given the hailing 
signs of distress of the five secret orders 
to which the witness belongs. Now if 
this witness is sworn, as a citizen, to tell 
the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth; and if he has also sworn, 
as a Mason, that he will aid and assist a 
brother in distress if he can; that is a 
complicated matter. If, as an Oddfel- 
low, he has sworn that he will help an 
Oddfellow who is in danger, if in his 
power, what will he do? Suppose the 
man has taken six different oaths ; which 
will he be likely to keep? He has upon 
him five oaths to help his brother lodge- 
man; one to tell the truth. He will be 
most likely to keep his lodge oaths. 
If he tells the truth when he goes upon 

the stand, this witness perjures himself 
to his lodges. If he perjures himself to 
the State, he must be tried and convicted ; 
and the utmost that the State can do is 
to send him to prison for a term of 
years. Put suppose he breaks his outh to 
the secret society ; his throat may De cut 
from ear to eat, his tongue torn out and 
buriee. in the sands of the sea, hi.^ heart 
torn out, his body cut in two, and his 
bowels burned to ashes. If he is a Roval 
Arch ftiason, the top of his skull may be 
smitten off and his brain exposed to The 
scorching rays of the noonday sun. If 
he is a Knight Templar, his head may be 
smitten of!' and placed upon the highest 
spire in Christendom. 



Now when these oaths are imposed up- 
on the consciences of men, and when 
these men come into the position where 
they must either break the oath id the 
lodge and keep the civil oath, or else 
break the civil oath and keep the lodge 
oath, which are they likely to keep sa- 
cred? One man says, "If I were sworn 
in court, I would tell the truth and pay no 
attention to my lodge obligation at all." 
Very good; but who beside yourself can 
know it to be truth? And even if we 
knew it to be true of you, who could say 
that it would be true of the thousands of 
lodgemen who will be sworn in court 
during the next six years? 

The moment the oath is gone, the 
courthouse is gone. If the oath of the 
witness is worthless, how about the oath 
of the sheriff, the jurymen, the judge? If 
the courthouse has nothing in it except 
quicksand; if the oath of God given in 
the courthouse is counteracted by the 
thousand oaths given to men in lodges; 
what security remains for the life or 
property of the man who is not a lodee- 
man ? And when we find that the lodge- 
man cannot be relied upon even for his 
own brethren, where is security for any 
man ? 

We find the Lodge destroying the fam- 
ily, destroying the church, and destroying 
civil government. This brings us again 
into the reign of anarchy, of which my 
predecessor this evening has spoken so 
eloquently. It is nothing but anarchy, 
when you cannot rely upon the vow in the 
home, in the church, and in the court- 
house. 

Not "Founded on the Bible." 

We find that the Bible is gone, if 
lodges prevail ; that Christian morality is 
gone, if lodges prevail; and that Chris- 
tian institutions are gone, if lodges pre- 
vail: yet men all over the country are 
saying to us, whenever this question 
comes up, "Why. our lodge is altogether 



108 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



founded upon the Bible. We have it on 
the altar in our lodges; it is carried in 
our funeral processions. Have not you 
yourself seen it carried in our funeral 
processions? If you come into our lodges 
you will find it there." 

Yes, we do find it there. For instance, 
in the Knights of Pythias lodge, in tak- 
ing one of the degrees, when the blind- 
fold is removed from the candidate's 
eyes, what he sees before him is this : an 
open coffin; in the coffin the skeleton of 
a man ; on top of the skeleton lie two 
crossed swords, and on these crossed 
swords an open Bible. That is the posi- 
tion in which the Bible is found in the 
lodge of the Knights of Pythias. 

Instead of being founded on the Bi- 
ble, lodges contradict the Bible, from be- 
ginning to end. Its morality, its institu- 
tions, the very existence of the Book it- 
self—all are imperiled by the existence 

of the lodges. 

If it is so clearly untrue that lodges 

are founded upon the Bible, how dees it 
happen that men say they are ? Are they 
dishonest men, who know that they are 
lying ; or are they deceived men, who be- 
lieve themselves to be speaking the 
truth? My conviction is absolute, that 
nine out of ten of the men who make this 
statement really believe they are speaking 
the truth when they say, "Our lodge is 
founded upon the Bible/' They general- 
ly believe that the thing they say is true. 
Why ? Simply because the average man 
is not so thoughtful as he ought to be. He 
sees in the Knights of Pythias lodge this 
coffin ; in that coffin a skeleton, which has 
cost the members of the lodge twenty- 
five, thirty, fifty dollars; over this skele- 
ton he sees the two crossed swords ; and 
on the crossed swords he sees the Bible. 
That man does not stop to think that any 
institution which takes the Bible and puts 
it in that position, and then brings him 
into the lodge-room and uncovers his 



eyes that he may look upon it, is essen- 
tially devilish. He says, "That is the Bi- 
ble ; our order is founded on it." 

A man goes into the Masonic lodge. 
In the ante-room he is stripped of all his 
clothing except his shirt ; he is provided 
with a pair of drawers (he cannot keep 
on his own) ; a slipper is put on his right 
foot, the left foot being bare ; the left 
leg, up to the knee, is exposed ; his shirt 
is unfastened and his left arm and left 
breast are bare. He kneels before the 
Masonic altar and the oath is given him, 
a few words at a time, he opening his 
mouth and swallowing whatever the Mas- 
ter of the lodge puts into it. Then the 
Master says, "In your present condition, 
what do you most desire?" One gentle- 
man is reported to have said, "I would 
like to get my pants and go home." But 
if the candidate makes any reply of this 
kind, the person instructing him whispers 
in his ear, "Light." So he repeats the 
answer furnished, "Light." The Master 
says, "Brother Senior Deacon and breth- 
ren, you will assist me in bringing the 
brother from darkness to light." The 
members of the lodge form in two lines 
in front of the candidate, who up to this 
time has been blindfolded. The Master 
begins to repeat the words of Holy Writ, 
"In the beginning God created the heav- 
ens and the earth," down to the words, 
"and God said, 'Let there be light;' and 
there was light." He continues, "In hum- 
ble commemoration of which august 
event we Masonically say, Let there be 
light." At the word "light" the hood- 
wink is removed, and Master and breth- 
ren make the due-guard of an Entered 
Apprentice.* For the first' time the can- 
didate sees what is before him. The 
Master says, "My brother, upon being- 
brought to light in this degree, you dis- 

*An older habit, perhaps still followed in some 
lodges, is, instead of making the due-guard of 
the degree, to clap the hands and s,tamp with the 
right foot. 



August, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



100 



cover the three great lights in Masonry, 
by the assistance of the three lesser. The 
three great lights in Masonry are the 
Holy Bible, square, and compasses. * * * 
The three lesser lights are three burning 
tapers placed in a triangular form." * * * 
He saw the Bible ; certainly he saw the 
Bible. But how did he see the Bible ? How 
was he dressed when he saw the Bible? 
If he went to church the next day after 
being initiated, and saw a man open the 
Bible upon the pulpit, would he not in- 
stantly think about the figure he cut the 
night before? If the minister should 
say, "Let us pray," would not his mmd 
go back at once to the night before, when 
the Senior Deacon of the lodge said to 
him, ''No man should ever enter upon 
any great or important undertaking with- 
out first invoking the blessing of Deity. 
You will therefore kneel and attend 
prayer." 

One young Baptist minister said to me, 
that the night he was initiated he was 
horrified to hear the most profane person 
in town repeating the prayer over him ; 
and that when he got through, the blas- 
phemer nudged him with his elbow and 

said, "Didn't I make a good 

prayer?" 

I do not wonder that you are horror- 
stricken ; but these things are done, not 
once or twice, but constantly, and natur- 
ally. 

The whole foundation of Masonry, and 
of the lodges which are like Masonry — 
the whole foundation of the lodge system 
in our country — is the suppression of the 
Word of God and of the teachings based 
upon it. 

What Can Be Done? 

Let me take a moment to ask this ques- 
tion : Since it is true that the spirit of the 
Lodge is one spirit, and that of the Bible 
is another; since we find it to be true 
that there is no possible method of har- 



monizing these two things; what is the 
reason that the workers in our cause are 
so few? 

I do not believe there is one man in 
this room, lodgeman or anti-lodge man, 
who doubts for an instant that secret so- 
cieties are contrary to the Word of God, 
and to the Christian church, and Chris- 
tian home, and Christian state. If this 
is true, why do we not have more work- 
ers in this blessed ministry? 

Why is it that fathers and mothers so 
many times allow their children to grow 
up in ignorance of the character and 
teachings of those organizations which 
will solicit their membership the minute 
they put their foot outside the parental 
home ? 

Why is it that the average college — I 
might have said, a little while ago, the 
average high school— permits these or- 
ganizations, which are corrupting the 
foundations of the moral character of 
young men ? 

I have no hesitation in saying that this 
has been the secret of our inaction : the 
fact that we have actually doubted 
whether anything effective could be done. 
The average Christian, in my judgment, 
says, "Of course the lodge is wrong; of 
course the lodge is against the home; of 
course the lodge is against the church; 
of course the lodge is against the state : 
but we cannot help it. It is here, it rules 
the land; but we cannot do anything." 
Therefore, thinking that we can do noth- 
ing, nothing is done, nothing is attempt- 
ed. 

What does the church need to-day? 
What does each one of us need? More 
than everything else, we need the Chris- 
tian confidence in our souls that Jesus 
Christ is to rule this world, "from sea to 
sea, and from the river unto the ends of 
the earth." When a man or woman gets 
into the still, deep, strong, abiding convic- 
tion that this world actually belongs to 



no 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



God, and to Jesus Christ, who bought it 
with His precious blood and who will 
rule it, that person loses the fear of man, 
because he has confidence in God. 

I do not know how to close this word 
more fittingly than by relating a little in- 
cident which occurred in the history of 
Holland. When Germany was looking 
with envious eyes on a portion of that 
low country, Holland sent one of her wis- 
est statesmen as her representative at the 
court of Berlin. He was to learn all he 
could of the danger which threatened 
his country. The Germans wished prop- 
erly to impress this wise man from the 
Hague, and so arranged a magnificent 
military review. Scores of thousands of 
soldiers were reviewed. Cavalry, infantry, 
and artillery were sweeping across the 
plain. Here came the German infantry. 
The General reviewing the troops said to 
the Hollander, "Is not that a beautiful 
stent?" "Yes," the Hollander said, "that 
is a beautiful sight ; those are fine sol- 
diers : but they are too short." The Ger- 
man was taken aback. He wondered why 
this Hollander should say those splendid 
German soldiers were too short. Regi- 
ment after regiment marched by, and the 
German again exclaimed, "Is not that a 
beautiful regiment?" "Yes," said the 
Hollander, "that is a magnificent regi- 
ment ; but what a pity it is that those men 
are so short." The German was nettled, 
but he thought he would wait. Directly 
along came the King's guards, straight 
down from the Great Frederick ; not a 
man in the regiment below six feet — a 
regiment of giants. As these magnificent 
men came marching by, the German turn- 
ed once more to the Hollander, and, 
thinking he would be satisfied with the 
height of that regiment, he said, "Are 
not these splendid men?" "Yes," was 
the reply, "they are splendid men; they 
march beautifully; but they are yet too 
short." The German was thoroughly an- 



gry. He said, "Sir, I would like to know 
what you mean by saying all of our men 
are too short." The Hollander answered, 
"I mean that we can flood our country 
twelve feet deep." 

I was in Boston the other day, and I 
heard a minister say, that the trouble 
with most men is that their wishbones are 
where their backbones ought to be. I be- 
lieve the wishbone of every man and 
woman in this edifice is that there was 
not a lodge in Chicago. If there were 
no lodges in Chicago, it would be com- 
paratively easy to deal with the saloons 
of Chicago. If the lodges and saloons 
of Chicago were wiped out, it would be 
a small matter to deal with the gambling 
hells and brothels. If the gambling hells 
and brothels in this city were wiped out, 
how many a woman who watches to- 
night, with tear-stained face and with 
sinking heart, for the footfall of her hus- 
band, would look up and be happy ! Were 
the lodges and saloons all gone, how 
many men, now battling with these evils, 
would take courage and hope ! If we, the 
men and women who are here to-night, 
could only have the determination of that 
Hollander, who said, "We will put our 
country twelve feet under the sea, before 
we will lose the fight for our land;" if 
we could only have our backbones where 
our wishbones are; if we could only see 
that the thing which in our highest and 
best moments we long for, is the thing 
which God will in His own good time 
bring about ; we should go out into life 
with a stronger courage, and be more ef- 
fective men and women than we are. God 
grant that there may come to each one 
of us this spirit of confidence in God, in 
His Word, in His Church, in His Son, 
in the triumph of His cause ! God grant 
that this confidence may come to each 
one of us to-night, and to-morrow, and 
all the to-morrows, until the day dawn 
and the shadows flee away. 



Angus;. 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Ill 



BENEFICENCE OF SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Like myself, he was a church-member 
and, at the time, not engaged in lucrative 
employment. Unlike myself, he was mar- 
ried and living with his parents, while I 
had no home but lived in boarding- 
houses and restaurants. When applying 
recently for work he had been turned 
down by some church-members who, he 
said, were abundantly able to give him 
assistance; he had not applied for mon- 
ey, only for work. 

On the table between us lay an even- 
ing paper, and my attention was drawn 
to an article on secret societies, one par- 
agraph of which said that lawyers, pas- 
tors and laymen of all creeds have rec- 
ognized their beneficent qualities, and 
that many of them were enthusiastic 
members. I took exception to the view 
held by the writer, whereupon the fol- 
lowing conversation ensued : 

"Well," he said, "I think the church 
can learn a lot from the lodge. A lodge- 
man will always help a brother, and 
that's more than you can say of the 
church." 

''I think you have a wrong idea of 
what the real mission of the church is," 
was my reply. "It was established pri- 
marily to administer to the spiritual 
needs of men, and not to secure jobs for 
them." 

"Well, if the church can't exercise a 
little charity towards people at the same 
time, I think she'd better close her doors 
and quit. Charity is the very essence of 
religion, for charity means love; and I 
don't see how you can defend a church 
which refuses to extend help to a needy 
brother." 

I realized there was much truth in 
what he said, but I thought that he look- 
ed at things from the wrong angle, and 
made a mistake in regarding the lodge as 
a pattern for the church. 

"Now," look here," said I; "I object 
strenuously to your calling the aid which 
the lodge gives to its members 'charity.' 
It isn't charity at all, but simply a form 
of mutual insurance. They won't take in 
a man who is not physically strong and 
able to pay in advance; and as soon as 
he becomes delinquent in his dues, that 
moment is he refused all assistance, no 
matter how needy he may be. And the 



mention of lodge insurance payments or 
fulfillment of other obligations, to the 
detriment of the Church of Jesus Christ 
is as slanderous as it is unjust " 

"Well, the Bible says that Jesus went 
about doing good, ministering to people's 
physical needs as well as to the spiritual ■ 
and surely you don't mean to say that the 
church should not follow His example »" 
No, of course not; but we have no 
record of His giving people any money 
or any jobs, and we are not told that He 
relieved physical want except by a mira- 
cle, and surely the church can hardly imi- 
tate Him there. Instead of offering them 
financial inducements to become His dis- 
ciples, He assured them that hatred and 
persecution awaited them. If you turn 

orVd/thtf V n «*W^ 

or add that feature to it, it'll be full of 

bums and deadbeats before the year s 
J* m f T alive r he said, turning to 

ter be naked, and in lack of daily food 
and one of you say unto them,' Go in 
peace, be ye warmed and filled; and vet 
ye give them not the things needful to 
the body; what doth it profit?' W 
vour remarks with a little reason and 
common sense!" 

"I admit your point. I know that often 
the representatives of the church ar " 

to say that they should not have treated 
you differently But though I admit tha 
the churches do not do their duty I do 
not admit that the lodges are needed on 

as ouTTnH Under SUCh a ^ernment 
never ^ "V* J™* ° f P eace ' there 
And hi M eed u° f i 5 ^ 0r ^^ation3, 
And, besides, the church has other way, 
of ministering to the physical wants of 
people that are more proficient than' the 
lodge method, and that is by building up 

Chr ist; and that means increase of fidel- 
ity to the employer, it means reliability, 
so ultimately, an increase in salary, and 
often it means a Christian home.- and 
plied " S extended and multi- 

"Well'' was his reply; "if a church 
cant help its own members, if it can't 
help the needy and suffering within it, 
own portals, then it doesn't have faith 



112 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



as well as works; something's wrong 
somewhere." 

"But you don't seem to realize that all 
our public charities to-day are the out- 
growth of public sentiment which has 
been created by the church, and when the 
church can get the State to take up these 
various charities and support them by 
1 taxation, then her labors along that line 
should be at least curtailed and her ener- 
gies directed elsewhere. It is only be- 
cause of the teachings of the Christian 
church that we have hospitals and asy- 
lums in our midst to-day. Too, when 
people are starving in India, Russia, or 
China, it is from the Christian nations 
that they expect and do receive help. The 
lodge has absolutely nothing to teach the 
church in that regard." 

"That's all right for theory," was his 
reply; "you take the palm there, but 
when it comes down to something con- 
crete, you balk and excuse the church. 
You don't practice what you preach." 

It was what I interpreted to be his bit- 
terness and resentment towards the 
church which led me to pass by the truth 
in his argument, which I would not have 
done with some one else, but I still main- 
tain that his angle of vision was wrong. 
And that the church has anything to 
learn from a secret, mutual-benefit so- 
ciety, which calls the payment or fulfill- 
ing of its obligations "charity" — that I 
considered mere impertinence and false- 
hood. Accident or life insurance socie- 
ties or companies, which are not secret, 
do the same thing, call it business, and 
thank the people for the privilege of do- 
ing it. 



But — was I right ? 



A. 



(Editor's Note : For au illustration of lodge 
helpfulness, see Cynosure of May, 1908, 
page 11.) 



Two of my friends, something like 
twenty years ago, united with a secret 
society. Each of them took out a certifi- 
cate for benefits in case of his death. 
Each of them agreed to pay to the insur- 
ance lodge a certain amount of money 
every month. This charge, which they 
took upon themselves, amounted to some- 
thing over $6o per year, and they have 
paid this sum of money now for just 
about twenty years. They are neither 



of them old men. as yet. But one of them 
is past 50, approaching 60, and the lodge 
of which he is a member, and to which 
he • has faithfully paid his dues every 
month for twenty years, is becoming 
anxious about him. They recently sent 
him a communication in which they noti- 
fied him of a decided increase in month- 
ly dues, they being nearly doubled. In- 
stead of paying $60 every year, they 
wished him to pay in the neighborhood 
of $140. If he does not choose to pay 
this, he can work away on his present 
charges until he is 65, when he will be 
required to pay $24.80 per month plus 
council dues of 40 cents for the rest of 
his ■ life. That is, they wish him, after 
he is 65, to pay twelve times $24.80 an- 
nually, in order to keep his insurance 
good. They sign all their letters "fra- 
ternally yours." ( Ordinary highway rob- 
bery is honorable compared with this 
method of dealing with men. 

When they are young and earning 
money, they sacrifice in order to pay their 
dues. They keep this up for ten years, 
twenty years, thirty years. As years in- 
crease, and earning power diminishes, 
their taxes are increased, and directly 
without as much as "by your leave," they 
are told, that when they are 65 years of 
age, unless they will pay more than $300 
per year for this "fraternal" insurance, 
their certificates will be cancelled, their 
payments will be embezzled and they will 
be left to get on the best they can. 
— C. A. Blanchard. 



Religion is not a fine suit to be kept in 
a wardrobe six days in the week and 
worn on Sabbaths only, but it is a suit 
to be worn every day of the week and 
everywhere we go. 

WAS WASHINGTON A MASON? 

By President C. A. Blanchard. Forty-eight pages 
and cover. Price, 10 cents, postpaid. 

In the introduction the author says : "I have 
for years heen intending to present with some care 
the relation of George Washington, General of the 
Colonial armies during the Revolutionary War, and 
first President of the United States, to Freemason- 
ry. I do not think that this duty should he longer 
delayed, and will now attempt as carefully as I 
can to discuss this question, which, from one point 
of view, is unimportant, hut from another is of 
the highest interest to all thinking people." 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 



Angus;, lOOtt. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



113 




The heart is best nourished when we There are undeveloped possibilities in 
are ministering to the needs of our every one, therefore no one should be de- 
neighbors, spised. 



If you would lead you must be willing The value of your religion depends on 

to be lonesome at times. how much of yourself is invested in it. 



114 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



WHAT SAYS RONAYNE? 

Editor of the Cynosure : 

I have long been an interested reader 
of the Cynosure, to which I seem to 
have owed uncounted acquisitions of in- 
teresting and valuable information. The 
very last issue, for instance, presented 
Dr. Dixon's wonderfully illuminating- 
discrimination between secrecy, organ- 
ized and systematized ; and privacy, flex- 
ible, and adaptable to specific duty and 
timely judgment. 

The same number contained a letter 
from Eclniond Ronayne, a veteran of 
your campaign, whom I have never met, 
yet to whom I owe aid that I do net 
laiow how to measure. Long ago his 
disciple, I still am glad to have a book of 
his at hand, ready for reference in case 
of need. Yet, gladly as I have availed 
myself of his guidance, I do not reach 
his sense of personal freedom from the 
Masonic oath. I share his regret, his 
detestation, and perhaps to some extent 
his outward as well as inward repudia- 
tion ; still, without ignoring or denying 
reasons that can be alleged for the free- 
dom that many have claimed, I have to 
confess that my own personal liberty of 
speech, especially with reference to the 
first degree, is subject to question in my 
own mind. 

Not long after my initiation, and 
prompt resolve to proceed no further, an 
acquaintance, who had been a journalist 
and who had little respect for Masonry, 
though long affiliated, told me of Rich- 
ardson's Monitor, which he had seen 
used in lodge work. I bought it, and 
soon supposed myself to know something 
about advanced degrees. Conversing, 
with a lodge officer who was present 
when I was initiated; I began to tell him 
about one point in a Knight's initiation, 
but checked myself, saying: 

"I don't know that I have a right to 
tell you about this." 

"Why not?" 

"You haven't taken this degree." 

"That makes no difference : you're not 
supposed to know anything you haven't 
received in the lodge." 

He was a Mason of some experience, 
and he so assured me of my right to tell 
him a secret not received in the lodge, 
that I proceeded, and afterward told 



some persons who were not Masons. 
Soon I was accused by another Mason 
of going out and telling what I learned in 
the lodge, when I promptly informed him 
that I had preserved silence about secrets 
of the degree I took. He did not con- 
travene the assurance the other Mason 
had given me, concerning my freedom 
respecting degrees I had not been given 
by the order, but virtually indorsed it, 
by saying: 

"If I had been there, I should have 
told him to keep his mouth shut." 

Were these two Masons right in hold- 
ing me to be free to tell what I had not 
received Masonically, even though I sup- 
posed it to be in its nature Masonic ? As- 
suming the oath to be valid, they ruled it 
inapplicable. The question had nothing, 
to do with the validity of the oath, but 
related only to its scope. 

Whether the Masonic oath is binding, 
is here an irrelevant issue ; so is any point 
of honor; debts of honor can be adjusted 
outside, but we are now in court, asking 
nothing but this: "Is it. so nominated in 
the bond?" 

Has such a question figured in any 
Masonic trial, or obtained any decision or 
dictum in Masonic jurisprudence? Is it 
referred to by any author, or has it re- 
ceived attention in any grand lodg#re- 
port? Has it been a matter of so com- 
mon understanding among Masons as to 
need no express authority? 

Mr. Ronayne initiated members when 
he was Master of a lodge in Chicago, 
and he gives what purports to be the 
oath which he administered. In this he 
uses the word "heretofore." Would -he 
claim to have meant, during that part of 
life preceding approach to the lodge, or 
to have had in mind the time spent in the 
lodge the same evening, before reaching 
this obligation? On the other hand, he 
also introduces the phrase, "at any future 
period be communicated." Communi- 
cated how — Masonically, in due order 
and form, or in any waj'? 

Of course such an oath, if taken, and 
if recognized as valid, would meet the 
candidate at every turn, applying to all 
secrets of each new degree he entered. 
Nevertheless, the question remains 
whether it would gain such application 
before the candidate entered each new 



■ 






' 



Augus;, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



ll.j 



lodge door. Could anything but new ini- 
tiation give it new jurisdiction? Could 
an obligation that followed the initiate 
like his shadow into every successive de- 
gree, also pursue him into the public li- 
brary? Old Reader. 



€5ttoriaL 



AUGUST 29, 1792— AUGUST 16, 1875. 
The month of August brings anniver- 
saries pertaining to an eminent preacher 
and educator belonging to a recent gen- 
eration, whose life was marked by strik- 
ing features and produced important re- 
sults. Charles Grandison Finney, named 
for the hero of Richardson's novel, was 
born in Warren, Conn., August 29, 
1792, and died in Oberlin, Ohio, August 
in, 1875. The child of parents who 
made no religious profession earlier than 
his own, he was unfavorably located for 
religious influences after the removal of 
the family to another State when he was 
two years old. Regular church attend- 
ance began when he was twenty years 
old. Then he twice returned to his native 
town to attend a high-school, where lie 
attended church, apparently without much 
interest, during these limited periods of 
study. 

Yet, afterward, he was known in 
America and England as a wonder till 
evangelist ; a theater was bought in New 
York city for him to preach in, out of 
which proceeded seven new churches; 
and the well-known Broadway Taberna- 
cle, of which he was the first pastor, was 
built for him, Besides this, he was pro- 
fessor of Theology and author of a text- 
book of Theology. Yet, until he was at 
least more than twenty-five years old, he 
never owned a Bible; and he bought his 
first one only because he found the law 
books full of Biblical quotations and al- 
lusrons or references. 

.Having begun the study of law in dSiS, 
when he was twenty-six years old, he be- 
came a member of the bar; but after a 
wonderful religious experience, he was 
licensed to preach, in 1824, and for about 
ten years was an evangelist. At inter- 
vals, he continued to do evangelistic work, 
afterwards. 



His career as an educator began at 
Oberlin in 1835, when he was forty-three 
years old, and he died there at the age 
of eighty-three. Within about two /ears 
he assumed the additional care of the lo- 
cal pastorate. He founded and edited 
the Oberlin Evangelist, and was also the 
founder of the Oberlin quarterly. His 
books include volumes of lectures and 
sermons, one of the later ones being 
made up and enlarged, by himself, from 
a series of letters contributed by him to 
a well-known religious journal published 
in New York, and having for its sub- 
ject, "The Character, Claims, and Prac- 
tical Workings of Freemasonry." 

He had joined the Masons while awav 
from home, in Connecticut, attending 
high-school, soon after he was twenty- 
one years old. At Adams, N. Y., where 
he began to study law when he was about 
twenty-six, he found a lodge which he 
connected himself with, soon becoming 
its Secretary. Here he remained while 
studying and practicing law, until his 
conversion. During part of his connec- 
tion with that lodge its Master was a 
deist, and he says : "There were in that 
lodge some as thoroughly irreligious men 
as I have ever associated with anywhere, 
and men with whom I would never have 
associated had they not been Freema- 
sons." It is to be remembered that he 
was then in a law-office, and that for a 
good part of his previous life he had not 
been a church-goer, and that he was con- 
sidered irreligious until he was twenty- 
nine years old. That he was not partic- 
ularly exacting as to the moral eharac^er 
of the system, he himself indicates, sav- 
ing: "When I took the Master's degree, 
I was struck with one part of the obliga- 
tion, or oath, as not being sound either 
in a political or moral point of view. 
However, I had been brought up with 
very few religious privileges, and had 
but slight knowledge on moral subjects ; 
and I was not, therefore, great lv shock- 
ed, at the time, with the immorality of 
anything through which I passed." 

He paid the strictest attention to the 
lodge lectures and teachings, becoming a 
"bright Mason," that is, one who had all 
in memory. He says: "The oaths, or ob- 
ligations, were familiar to me. as was 



116 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



everything else that belonged to those 
three degrees that I had taken." 

This combines with other obvious rea- 
sons for listening attentively to what lie 
says. His book is doubtless one of the 
best advisers that can be consulted by a 
candid person wishing to know whether 
it is wise to join. Certainly he can here 
obtain the counsel of an eminent clergy- 
man, a college president, and a trained 
lawyer, who has also been an accom- 
plished Freemason. 



Rev. Mead A. Kelsey, well known 
among the Friends in connection with 
evangelistic and reform work, favored 
the Cynosure office with a call last 
month, when passing through Chicago on 
his way from Winthrop Center, Maine, 
to Berkeley, California, where he is to 
take charge of a new church of about 
two hundred members. 



The Knights of Pythias recently erect- 
ed, and dedicated, a monument in mem- 
ory of one of their members who, in a 
flood in Iowa, lost his own life after sav- 
ing twenty-seven from drowning. His 
wife begged him not to go out into the 
flood again, and his friends tried forci- 
bly to prevent him, but he broke from 
them and, risking his life once more, lost 
it, leaving his wife a widow and his little 
children fatherless. The record says 
that he had been known, before he lost 
his life, as a quiet, hard-working Chris- 
tian. This event occurred in May, 1892. 

Now the Knights of Pythias erect a 
monument and celebrate the man as an 
example of the virtues taught by their 
order. Persons who pass by the monu- 
ment and read the inscription will re- 
ceive the impression that this man did 
what he did because he was a member of 
this secret society; and yet it is evident 
to even a careless thinker that his lod.ge 
relations had nothing to do with his he- 
roic act. It is equally evident that his 
Christian faith, for which he had been 
known through years, was the occasion 
of his self-sacrifice. The monument 
therefore becomes a "stone lie," set up to 
deceive all who look upon it. 

The Knights of Pythias do not teach 
men to risk their lives to save people 
who are in danger : they teach men to put 



themselves to inconvenience, to take 
risks, for the sake of their lodge brothers 
and friends. 

There is no hint that this man had any 
information about the lodge relations of 
the people whom he rescued. He saw 
persons in danger of death by drowning, 
and plunged into the flood to bring them 
out. This is exactly in accordance with 
the teaching of the Christian religion; 
it is in perfect harmony with the exam- 
ple of Jesus Christ; but this monument 
represents it as the fruit of a secret or- 
ganization which obligates its members 
to aid and assist one another. 

Quite in accordance with the custom o f 
secret societies, and with the infidelity to 
truth of certain ministers, one prayed 
and another pronounced the benediction 
at the memorial services, while the ad- 
dresses were given by lodgemen. Of 
course these preachers may have been 
lodgemen too; but if they were, they 
were not honored with the principal parts 
in the program. Just as at large funer- 
als lodgemen wish preachers and church- 
es to aid a little by doing advertising for 
them, so here the lodge used the churches 
for its own purposes. The church ap- 
pears in the humiliating position of a 
mere servant of the secret society. 

If the truth had been told on that mon- 
ument, it would have said, "Here lies a 
man who gave his life to save people 
whom he did not; know. He had not 
sworn to help them,, but he saw they .were 
in danger; they had not sworn to help 
him, they were simply men, women, and 
children in dire need ; and like a Chris- 
tian man, he flew to their assistance at 
the peril of his life." 

A minister would have had the right 
to pray at the service if this truth had 
been told; but no minister, no honest 
man of any kind, had a right to partici- 
pate m such a service as was held. . 






BURDEN OF PROOF. 
Does the Burden of Proof Rest on Mason- 
ry or Anti-Masonry? 

" Possession is nine points of law;" 
and this principle is the key to any ques- 
tion affecting the location of the burden 
of proof, in case of proposals involving 
change. In logic, ''Whatever is, is 



Angus?, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



117 



right," and that is a second statement 
of the same principle, so far as its ap- 
plication to burden of proof is con- 
cerned. Shall what is established or 
located be removed ? Not without cause, 
and the cause must be set forth and 
proved adequate. The burden of proof 
rests on the proposal just as the neces- 
sity of its statement does. Shall some 
specified thing be abolished or allowed to 
pass out of existence? Not until its 
worthlessness or injuriousness is proved. 
Any such change must be stated in 
order to be considered; its desirability 
must be set forth by proof in order to 
be considered favorably. 

Proof on the other side, would be 
superfluous and gratuitous before the 
statement or proposal, because it could 
not accomplish anything not secured al- 
ready without it. Between proposition 
and proof the same state of things con- 
tinues. Therefore the burden of proof, 
which means initiation of proof, belongs 
to proposal. 

To state the case in another way, un- 
til something is said there is nothing to 
be answered. When what is to be said is 
argument for change or destruction, 
dispute or defense is impossible except 
against attack, and until an attacking 
argument is made. 

To set it in a judicial light, the burden 
of proof rests on the accuser, who may 
be the inventor of an empty charge and 
must show what the accused is held to 
have done. A man not accused might 
boast, but could not defend himself. 
Until guilt is proved, innocence is as- 
sumed ; in default of proof, the charge is 
not entertained ; on the failure of at- 
tempted proof, the case is dismissed. The 
burden of proof rests on the accuser. 

Or again, no one can refute nothing; 
something must be set forth for accept- 
ance or refutation. 

Things that stand do not need sup- 
port ; what would need support or proof 
would be the duty or privilege of remov- 
ing them. What obviously exists al- 
ready, is to be observed rather than 
proved or even justified; what ought to 
exist or take place, is what needs to be 
proved in order to develop motive. This 
necessity of providing motive locates the 



burden of proof. The burden of proof 
rests, not on him who, at most, needs 
only to recognize what is, but on him 
who pleads for what ought to be. 

An exception in appearance but not in 
fact, arises when a thing or action which 
has become habitual or inveterate, is in- 
congruous with general conditions and 
adverse to the regular course and nature 
of things. In reality, it is in essence not 
the thing in possession nor the main 
thing that exists. The nine points of 
law belong to something on which this 
habitually intrudes; something greater 
and rightfully exclusive of it is right 
by virtue of larger and oversweeping 
existence. Upon it, therefore, for the 
very principle stated, rests continually 
and irremovably the burden of proof. 
This is not by virtue of exception but by 
operation of the rule. 

Does the burden of proof rest on Ma- 
sonry or Anti-Masonry? The answer 
depends on whether Masonry is viewed 
under the obvious rule or apparent 
though unreal exception. The case of 
Masonry can reasonably be argued from 
each point of view, according to con- 
venience and the exigencies of discus- 
sion. For Masonry can justly be treated 
as a thing existing which Anti-Ma- 
sonry seeks to overthrow, and thus the 
burden of proof rests on the assailant. 
It can also justly be treated as an ag- 
gression assailing the normal condition 
of things and proposing great changes 
in the life of each initiate and in the 
normal course of society. In that view 
it must bear the burden of proof. 

It is evident that this is the broader 
and more inclusive view, and that in the 
final issue it is not Anti-Masonry but 
Masonry which is actually bound in rea- 
son and honor to bear the burden. It 
proposes exceptions, it transforms things 
normal into those abnormal ; it is aggres- 
sive and destructive; and it is all these 
with things so much greater than itself 
and so established and rightfully exist- 
ent that it completely assumes the bur- 
den of proof. 



If you would find gladness you must 
play life's great game with eagerness and 
fairness. 



118 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



®bttttartj. 



R. A. CULLOR. 

R. A. Cullor, son of Joseph and Sarah 
Cullor, of Stokes County, North Caroli- 
na, was born June i, 1836. He married 
Miss Laura L. Tilley, daughter of A. N. 
and L. Tilley, July 27, 1858. He moved 
to Sangamon County, Illinois, in January 
of 1 861, and from there to Shelby Coun- 
ty, Missouri, in September of the same 
year. He went to Putnam County, 
Missouri, in September, 1862. In 
March, 1864, he enlisted in the 12th Mis- 
souri Cavalry, U. S. Army, and in July, 
1S65, went with the regiment onto the 
western plains to look after the Indian 
trouble. He was honorably discharged 
in April, 1866. 

To him and his wife were born eleven 
children— six sons and five daughters. 
The second son died in infancy. 
, Mr. Cullor departed this life July 19, 
1908 ; aged seventy-two years, one 
month, and eighteen days. He. obtained 
a hope in Christ in the year 1876. He 
united with the Missionary Baptist 
church, but because of lodgery among 
them, left them; but he held to his hope 
to the last. (Elder) A. B. Lipp. 



letw of ®ur Jiori 



INDIANA, ATTENTION! 

■What shall we do with the problem of 
the secret societies, with their religious 
teachings? is a perplexing question that 
confronts every true minister of the gos- 
pel to-day. With the present spiritual 
declension, it will not be long until empty 
form will be all that remains in a multi- 
tude of places where once the Church of 
Jesus Christ flourished. 

"Come, let us reason together," was 
the plea of God to ancient Israel; and 
surely we need to study this question 
carefully. There is reason why we 
should oppose the work of secret socie- 
ties, and ignorance of them and of their 
methods prevents successful opposition to 
this gigantic evil. A great many people 
honestly believe that it is proper and 
right to hold membership in secret so- 



cieties. These people must be made 
to see the wrong there is in the societies. 
To simply tell them they are wrong, is 
not sufficient; the statement must be 
proven. The evidence must be sought 
out ; we must come to the people with a 
knowledge of the facts in the case. That 
the life and energy of the Church is be- 
ing sapped by the Lodge, is evident ; but 
Why ? is the question. The moral teach- 
ing of the Lodge is declared to be of as 
high a standard as that of the Church: 
then where is the wrong in the Lodge? 
It is in wresting the scriptures from 
their proper context, and making them 
appear to teach that which was never in- 
tended. And further, the oaths and 
pledges that are exacted from candidates 
are contrary to good government, home 
life, and religion. If we are to save peo- 
ple from this deception, we must put 
forth effort. 

There should not only be effort put 
forth, but a concerted, intelligent effort. 
This question should not be discussed in- 
cidentally only, but in an especial way. 
Meetings should be held, and lectures 
given that would expose the fraud and 
make men to see that the Lodge is an 
evil and not a good thing. There ought 
to be a united effort made on the part of 
those church organizations which already 
make the matter of secret societies a test 
of membership. Brethren, shall we not 
have your co-operation ? Shall there not 
be a delegation from your church to the 
coining Convention? Every one who at- 
tended the Convention at Fort Wayne 
was well repaid for the time spent. Will 
you not let me hear from you? If you 
need help locally, there are able speakers 
available, who would gladly come to the 
help of God's people in your place. Let 
us rescue some of the thousands of In- 
diana who have been hoodwinked by Sa- 
tan. 

Let us take up this matter both in its 
local and in its general bearing. Begin 
to plan for the Annual Convention, to be 
held some time during the late fall. 
Will not some member of each of the an- 
tisecrecy churches kindly inform me 
when the next annual conference of the 
church is to be held, and where? and 
arrangements will be made for an ofti- 



August, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



Ill) 



cial representative of the National Chris- 
tian Association to be there, to present 
the work of the Association. 

Sincerely, (Rev.) L. G. Bears, 

F rcsi<lent Indiana Convention of the Na- 
tional Christian Association. 
412 West 13th St., Peru, Ind. 



W. B. STODDARD'S REPORT. 

Lancaster, Pa., July 18, '08. 

Dear Cynosure: This finds me in east- 
ern central Pennsylvania, in the center 
of a most magnificent agricultural sec- 
tion. The limestone soil brings forth in 
abundance. 

As in the Garden of Eden, the Serpent 
is here. There is apparently great need 
for work such as the N. C. A. is doing. 
I think, with proper effort, a State Con- 
vention would be well sustained in this 
city. Shall it be next March, or later? 

I find those who have been reading the 
Cynosure manifest their appreciation by 
renewal, while new subscriptions are 
added. 

Following my last report I had some 
very helpful meetings in Ohio, prior to 
and including the State Convention. The 
three addresses given in United Presby- 
terian churches at Huntsville and North- 
wood, Ohio, were appreciated, the 
evening meeting at Huntsville being es- 
pecially well attended. The lectures that 
followed, in meeting-houses of the 
Church of the Brethren at Sidney and 
Lima, were helpful. The "Radical" Uni- 
ted Brethren meetings at Findlay and 
Allentown contributed to the general 
good. Pastors and people showed a live 
interest in this live question. I believe 
there were some lodge people present, 
who naturally were not pleased with 
what was said. The editor of a local pa- 
per at Sidney published a report of our 
meeting, and in reply published a denial 
of well established facts. I trust there 
may be further discussion at this place, 
to help those who might otherwise be de- 
ceived. The friends there may be sure 
I am prepared to stand behind the state- 
ments made, which were denied by the 
lodge editor. 

The Ohio State Convention far ex- 
ceeded our expectation. This perhaps 
was due to lack of faith in God and a 



knowledge of the people to whom we 
came. Evidently the Christian people 
around Pandora make it their business to 
serve the Lord, and run their farms to 
pay expenses. That they would leave the 
harvest-field and turn out to an antise- 
crecy meeting told of no ordinary inter- 
est. They gave their attention and what 
money was required, and we who served 
sought in turn to give the best we had. 
Dr. Blanchard's address on "The Lodge 
versus Modern Civilization" was a pre- 
sentation worthy of the occasion. It was 
the climax of a most successful Conven- 
tion. The work of President Sanderson 
was of the highest order. Our welcome 
and general support was cordial and all 
that could be desired. I am sure the 
friends felt this gathering was worth all 
it cost. 

Since coming to this section I have 
been much encouraged. The Pennsylva- 
nia German mind works slowly and is 
suspicious of the stranger. When those 
of our kind find out who I am, and what 
I am doing, they are with us to stay. 
Each visit shows an increase in the num- 
ber of those who stand with us, as we 
believe we are standing with Christ for 
the upbuilding of His Kingdom. A cor- 
dial welcome awaited me at the old 
Hopewell United Presbyterian church in 
York County, where I spoke last Sab- 
bath. A storm prevented the meeting ar- 
ranged for the evening. I have visited 
this church several times, but never 
found it in a more prosperous condition. 
The people here are a unit in opposition 
to the secrecy evil. With an able young 
man as pastor, supported by his excellent, 
capable wife, they may be expected to go 
forward. 

At Columbia, Pa., I began new work. 
The Missouri Lutheran pastor showed 
much kindness. Cynosures were planted 
and a revisit, with lecture, promised if 
Providence favors. 

The Christian and Missionary Alliance 
people are gathered at Rocky Spring, a 
short trolley ride from here. Their meet- 
ings are well attended, 1 have taken the 
opportunity to twice visit the camp. The 
leaders felt that they should occupy the 
time with work along their special lines, 
and so did not invite a discussion of the 
anti-secrecy question. I was glad to find 



J 20 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



frequent expressions in the addresses 
showing disapproval of the Lodge. A 
young missionary from Africa, in show- 
ing pictures illustrative of that country 
and people, presented a strange looking 
object, with the remark that the native 
was dressed in the costume of his secret 
society. He added, "Perhaps this secret 
society is not as bad as the Freemasons, 
but it's bad enough." 

When friends connected with the 
Church of the Brethren at Ephrata, Pa., 
were asked to give me a hearing some 
years ago, a majority of the officials voted 
no. I am announced to speak in this 
church to-morrow, and I trust the Breth- 
ren will not be sorry they have thus in- 
vited me. Those who are slow to listen 
to strangers, even when speaking on 
good topics, are to be commended. In 
our age not every one who advocates a 
worthy cause is a worthy man. The 
man who knows he is right can afford to 
wait. As usual I am rinding more work 
than I can do. Yours in the work, 

W. B. Stoddard. 



We had a great meeting at Pandora ; 
the largest audience that I have seen at 
a State Convention in many a day. I 
think close to seven hundred people were 
out at night — surely six hundred or 
more — and God was with the Word. — 
Charles A. Blanchard. 



OHIO CONVENTION MINUTES. 

The first session of the Annual Con- 
vention for 1908 met in the Grace Men- 
nonite church, at Pandora, Ohio, June 29, 
at 7 :45 p. m. Elder I. J. Rosenberger, of 
the Church of the Brethren, opened the 
services by scripture lesson and prayer. 

The Address of Welcome was given by 
Rev. C. W. Oyer, of the Missionary 
church of Pandora. He extended words 
of welcome to visiting delegates, and ex- 
pressed a fond hope that the truth con- 
cerning the evils of secrecy might be so 
brought out that we might see more 
clearly how to counteract and overcome 
them. 

The Response was given by President 
W. J. Sanderson, of Cedarville. He 
brought out the various meanings of the 
word "Pandora," and was glad for the 



best the town had. tie concluded by 
saying that the importance of holding 
conventions of this nature was apparent, 
when the ignorance of most people on the 
subject of organized secrecy was called 
to mind. 

Rev. W. B. Stoddard addressed the 
meeting on "The Masonic Lodge Inside 
Out." In the introduction, the common 
remark that a person not identified with 
the lodges knows nothing about them, 
was cleared up by well-chosen words and 
apt illustrations. The mercenary induce- 
ments held out by the lodge to prospec- 
tive candidates for membership, were 
ventilated. Some, the speaker claimed, 
were drawn into the lodge through curi- 
osity. 

The following committees were ap- 
pointed by the meeting : 

On State Work : Elder I. J. Rosenber- 
ger, Covington; Wm. H. Minton, Bowl- 
ing Green; Rev. J. B. Omerod, Dunkirk. 

On Finance: Rev. Otto Lichti, Pando- 
ra; Rev. W. B. Stoddard, Washington, 
D. C. ; Prof. E. J. Hirshler, Bluffton. 

On Nominations of State Officers: 
Rev. C. W. Oyer, Pandora; Wm. Hea- 
cock, Dunkirk; Rev. C. Hege, Bluffton. 

On Resolutions : Rev. D. O. Tussing*, 
Findley; A. Cupp, Lima; Rev. F. W. 
Stanton, Ada. 

The Tuesday morning session, June 
30th, convened at the Missionary Church, 
and was opened by devotional services led 
by Rev. W. J. Sanderson. 

Letters to the Convention from the fol- 
lowing friends of the Association were 
read by Rev. Stoddard: F. A. Dental, 
Pastor of the North Creek Congregation, 
Hicksville, O. ; Rev. J. D. Allen, Elida, 
O. ; Rev. W. C. South, Bloomdale, O. ; 
F. W. Stanton, Pastor of the First M. E. 
Church, Ada, O. ; Rev. James P. Stod- 
dard, Corresponding Secretary of the 
New England Christian Association, Bos- 
ton, Mass.; Elder- J. Swank, Brookville, 
O. ; F. D. Hauptmann, New Waterford, 
O. ; A. M. Overholt, W T adsworth, O. ; Al- 
bert E. Smith, President of Ohio Normal 
University, Ada, O. ; Wm. I. Phillips, 
General Secretary of National Christian 
Association, Chicago, 111. ; Milton 
Wright, Pastor of United Brethren 
church, Dayton, Ohio ; J. C. . Webster, 



Aug u si% 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



121 



New Concord, O. ; Rev. G. W. Turtle, 
Long Bottom, O. ; Rev. J. M. Faris, 
Bellefontaine, O. ; D. W. Lawrence, Wa- 
pakoneta, O. ; Rev. J. Hoffhines, Etna, 
O. ; Rev. J. B. Omerod, Ada, O. ; J. F. 
Smith, for Quarterly Conference of 
Bloomdale Circuit, New Albany, O. ; J. 
M. Scott, Granville, O. ; J. W. Burton, 
Pastor United Brethren church, New Al- 
bany, O. ; John P. Robb, D. D., Sidney, 
O. ; S. N. Buck, Columbus Grove, O. ; 
Rev. H. M. Malson, North Baltimore, 
O.; Rev. H. H. Hinman, Oberlin, O. ; 
Rev. O. H. Ramsey, Delaware, O. ; D. L. 
Cowden, M. D., Kimbolton, O. ; H. R. 
Smith, Jr., Leonardsburg, O. 

The meeting voted to have the Secre- 
tary send the letters to the Christian 
Cynosure for further disposition. 

The report of the State Treasurer was 
read and approved. 

It was voted that the President, Vice- 
President and Secretary act as a com- 
mittee to find and appoint a State Agent 
who could devote his time to the work in 
the State. 

Rev. Lichti of the Finance Committee 
gave a report in part. 

Report of Committee on State Work 
was given by Elder I. J. Rosenberger and 
approved, as follows : 

We believe that progress is being made 
in different parts of the State. The State 
Agent has not given all his time to the 
work ; arrangements have not been made 
yet so to do ; but success has attended his 
efforts. The Eastern Secretary has given 
a portion of his time to our needs and 
reports many enthusiastic meetings held. 
There has been quite an increase in the 
Cynosure subscription list and the circu- 
lation of N. C. A. literature. The num- 
ber of Christians leaving the lodges is, 
we think, more than usual. There seems 
to be a live interest in different parts of 
the State. 

Your Committee would recommend : 

i. That all members and friends of 
the Association renew their diligence in 
proclaiming the truth in opposition to the 
lodges and their work. 

2. That pastors consider themselves 
agents to secure subscriptions for the 
Cynosure and aid in circulating litera- 
ture of the National Christian Associa- 
tion. 



T 



3. That lectures be given wherever 
it is possible so to do. 

4. That if possible a State Agent be 
secured, and help on the field. 

5. That all pastors be urged to in- 
struct their people regarding the lodge 
evil, keeping special watch over the 
growing young, that they be timely warn - 
ed of the approaching evil. 

Signed by your Committee, 

I. J. Rosenberger, 
Wm. H. Minton. 

Rev. C. W. Oyer submitted the report 
on Nominations, which was accepted. It 
was voted that the nominees be elected. 
The officers for the year stand as fol- 
lows : 

Ohio State Officers, 1908=1909. 

President — Rev. W. J. Sanderson, Ce- 
darville, O. 

First Vice-President — Rev. S. P. 
Long, 49 W. Park av., Mansfield, O. 

Second Vice-President — Elder I. 
Rosenberger, Covington, O. 

Secretary — Rev. M. S. Steiner, Colum- 
bus Grove, O. 

Treasurer — Noah Schumacher, Pan- 
dora, Ohio. 

A number of questions were handed in 
and answered. 

At 11 a. m. Rev. W. B. Stoddard con- 
tinued his address on "The Masonic 
Lodge Inside Out." A clear exposure 
was made , showing the relation of secret 
societies to the family, to the church, and 
to the nation. Special attention was given 
to the penalties of the oaths. Leviticus 
5 : 5 was quoted as evidence that God 
does not require any one to keep a false 
oath. 

The meetings were enlivened by sing- 
ing. Dr. Blanchard closed the forenoon 
session by a solo and a benedictory 
prayer. 

The afternoon session was opened by 
President Sanderson with a scripture les- 
son and prayer. 

The following committee on "reporting 
the doings of the Convention to papers" 
was appointed: Rev. W. J. Sanderson to 
the Christian Nation; Rev. M. S. Steiner 
to the Gospel Herald; Rev. D. O. Trus- 
sing to the Christian Conservator; Elder 
I. J. Rosenberger to the Gospel Messen- 
ger; Rev. C. \V. Oyer to the Missionary 
Worker; Rev. Chris. E. Whetnall to the 



122 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



Wesleyan Methodist; Rev. Otto Lichti, 
to the Mennonite; Bro. Basinger to the 
Pandora Times. 

Rev. C. A. Blanchard, D. D., spoke on 
"The Work of the National Christian 
Association." A strong plea was made 
for a united Christian Church to muster 
its forces against the evil influences of 
Lodgeism. 

A letter to the Convention written by 
Rev. F. W. Stanton (seceded Mason) of 
Ada, Ohio, was read. 

Elder I. J. Rosenberger, of the Church 
of the Brethren, discussed "The Three 
Links of Oddfellowship." The inconsist- 
ency of these emblems (representing 
friendship, love, and' truth) with the 
practices of the order, was pointed out. 

The report of the Resolutions Com- 
mittee, submitted by Rev. D. O. Tussing, 
was adopted as follows : 

A "secret society" is an organization 
whose members are pledged to conceal 
their initiatory ceremony, their obliga- 
tion, or their inside workings. We be- 
lieve that these combinations are evil, and 
that Christians ought not to be connect- 
ed with them, for God says, "Be ye not 
unequally yoked together with unbeliev- 
ers: for what fellowship hath righteous- 
ness with unrighteousness? and what 
communion hath light with darkness? 
and what concord hath Christ with Be- 
lial? or what path hath he that believeth 
with an infidel? * * * Wherefore come 
out from among them, and be ye separate 
saith the Lord, and touch not the un- 
clean thing; and I will receive you, and 
will be a Father unto you, and ye shall 
be my sons and daughters, saith the Lord 
Almighty (II. Cor. 6: 14, 15, 17, 18). 

Whereas the secret lodge system is 
still doing its pernicious work, destruc- 
tive to individuals, to the family, the 
church, and the state ; and 

Whereas it is the duty of all Christians 
to know and maintain the truth ; there- 
fore 

Resolved, 1st, We believe the entire 
lodge system to be not only unchristian 
but antichristian in character and teach- 
ing. 

2nd, We believe the unequal yoke 
which is found in all lodges cannot be 
assumed by Christians without violating 



God's commands and attendant spiritual 
loss. 

3d, We believe instruction regarding 
the lodge evil to be important, that men 
be kept from its bondage. 

4th, As the need is very great, we be- 
lieve the Church should awake and put 
away from her midst the lodges which 
sap her life. 

5th, We find the lodges antagonistic to 
the home as God intended it to be, and 
destructive of domestic tranquility. 

6th, Lodges should be condemned, as 
they work in opposition to good govern- 
ment, not being required for any good 
purpose. 

7th, The tendency of the lodge teach- 
ing is to make men selfish, and to destroy 
those generous impulses found in Chris- 
tian life. 

8th, Lodge ceremonies, oaths, titles, 
and characters in general, are not in 
keeping with modern civilization. 

9th, We rejoice in the good work of 
enlightenment being carried on, with our 
co-operation and support. 

10th, That we will, so far as possible, 
secure an annual collection for the Na- 
tional Christian Association from the 
churches of which we are members. 

nth, Thanks are due and are given to 
the Christian friends who have enter- 
tained us, and to the musicians who have 
favored us with songs, and to the news- 
papers giving us kind notice. 

D. O. Tussing, 
A. Cupp, 

Committee. 

After devoting some time to questions 
and answers and announcements by Rev. 
Stoddard, the afternoon session was 
closed by the singing of a hymn, led by 
Prof. Amstutz. 

The evening services, from the open- 
ing, gave promise of a profitable meet- 
ing. Prof. Amstutz led the song ser- 
vices while the people gathered. Rev. 
G. A. Snyder, of Lima, led the devotional 
exercises. Rev. C. A. Blanchard, Presi- 
dent of the National Christian Associa- 
tion, and of Wheaton College (Illinois), 
addressed the meeting on "Secret Socie- 
ties versus Modern Civilization." The ad- 
dress was well rendered and warmly re- 
ceived. It was worth going a long way 



August, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



123 



to hear. President Sanderson closed the 
session with appropriate words of appre- 
ciation for the good received and ex- 
pressed hope for results. 

All the meetings were well attended. 
We have every reason to believe that the 
work of the Association will receive a 
new uplift by the Christian people of the 
State. M. S. Steiner, Secretary. 



AGENT DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Dear Cynosure : The East Mount Ol- 
ive Baptist Sunday School and Baptist 
Young People's Union Conventions were 
in session at the Brookport (Illinois) 
Baptist church, Rev. M. W. Washington, 
pastor, on June 24. There were about 
twenty-five Sunday Schools and B. Y. P. 
U.'s represented in this Convention, from 
several counties. I was introduced to the 
Convention and shown g-reat courtesy. 
Dr. Bennett delivered a very forceful ad- 
dress in which he strongly condemned 
unequal yoking of Christians and sinners 
together and giving sinners official rule 
over and with Christians. I secured a 
few Cynosure subscriptions and distrib- 
uted some tracts. 

Unionville, III., 
is six miles northeast of Brookport, and 
is isolated from both railroad and river. 
There is a great colony of negroes here, 
covering an area of about five miles 
through the country, many of whom are 
independent livers, owning from forty to 
200 acres of land, and well furnished 
homes. They have four good churches 
and one secret lodge hall. The old Mount 
Olive Baptist Sunday School and Bap- 
tist Young People's Conventions held 
their annual session here. There were 
about sixty Sunday Schools and B. Y. P. 
U.'s represented in this Convention.. I 
was very cordially received and intro- 
duced, and also given an opportunity to 
preach. Secretism is very strong in this 
Convention, but, thank God, there are a 
few true men who do not mince words. 
Revs. J. H. Fulton of Cairo, J. C. Par- 
rish of Mound City, S. S. Oliver of St. 
Johns and Mr. W. A. Cook, a young man 
of Cairo, each preached strong sermons 
and bore testimony against the "unfruit- 
ful works of darkness." I secured a 
number of subscriptions for the Cyno- 



sure here, and planted a good sowing of 
seed against loclgery. 

Metropolis, III., 

is a flourishing city on the banks of the 
beautiful Ohio River. There are four 
negro churches here, and a very large 
number of negro citizens. Secret lodges 
here are legion. I was cordially invited 
to preach at the First Baptist church on 
Sunday. 1 also addressed the Sunday 
School and poured several volleys of gos- 
pel dynamite into the forts of the secret 
empire which caused a great flutter and 
muttering in lodgedom. Cod most gra- 
ciously used my address to His own glory 
and made several converts. A Rev. Mr. 
Turner, however, attempted to defend 
the lodges and stated, "I b'long to seben 
lodges, and dare ain't nothin' in de lodges 
to cause members to fo'sake dere church- 
es. Hit's 'cause dey air hypercrits 
'cause dey doan 'tend de church." Prof. 
J. D. Alston very appropriately replied 
to Mr. Turner, and silenced his lodge 
battery. 

At 3 p. m. there was a lodge funeral 
at the Methodist church, and a lodge 
sermon at the Antioch Baptist church. 
They gathered at the Oddfellows' hall 
about three blocks away. A brass band 
furnished music, while about ten men, 
fifteen women, and about fifteen boys and 
girls, all uniformed and with lodge para- 
phernalia, marched in the middle of the 
street to the church. There their lead- 
ers formed an arch witli their swords, 
and each lodgeite ducked his or her head 
and passed under it and into the church. 
Rev. G. W. Rowlett preached their an- 
nual sermon, but he gave them a <^oo(\ 
gospel thrashing and pointed them I 1 
Calvary's Lamb that was slain for sin. 

At night I preached to a well-filled 
house, the audience numbering about 
three hundred. The Master poured out 
His Spirit and made me bear strong tes- 
timony against the mighty works of the 
devil. 1 secured a number <>t* C"S NOSUH 
subscriptions and left rejoicing that the 
good seed had been sown. 

Bloomington, 111. 

I came here July 10 by imitation of 
Pastor John T. Brown, ^i the Union 
Baptist church, to a>Mst in a .meat lent 
meeting. Dr. ( ". P. Jones, pastor o\ the 



124 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



Great Brick Table of Christ of Jackson, 
Miss., has been here with Brother Brown, 
the past two weeks, and God graciously 
used him here. The tent where the gos- 
pel meetings are being held is crowded 
each evening despite the fact that other 
pastors gave strict orders to their con- 
gregations not to attend these services. 
White and colored alike are flocking to 
the meetings. Well said Jesus, "And I, 
if I be lifted up, will draw all men unto 
Me." I have borne testimony against the 
lodge and secured some subscribers here. 
Rev. J. T. Brown is doing a great work 
here among his people. Both he and Rev. 
E. Hall are strong anti-secrecy men, and 
are doing much to convince their people 
of lodge folly. 

Decatur, 111 
I came here from Bloomington. There 
are quite a number of colored people 
here, and the lodges are about as else- 
where, having a good number marked 
for Satan. I had several private talks 
and planted the Cynosure here. 

Centralia, 111. 

I am again at home with Mrs. David- 
son, her health not being at all good. I 
find his Satanic majesty., king of secret 
lodgedom, is beginning to sow seeds of 
the viper here against my work, but I 
shall continue to sound the alarm and 
warn my people of their sins. The rum 
traffic and the secret lodge system are the 
greatest foes to the Christian church. Let 
us continue to pray mightily for com- 
plete victory over these twin evils. 

Yours for God and His righteousness, 
F. James Davidson, 
704 E. Howard St. 



AGENT PEGRAM'S REPORT. 

Melita, Mich., July 16, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure: After I left Brown 
City, where I met with a royal welcome 
and great appreciation from the Men- 
nonite Brethren, I went to Oxford. Here 
I found some staunch and loyal old read- 
ers of the Cynosure, who had been tak- 
ing it for years, and showed no signs 
whatever of weariness or dissatisfaction 
with it. I got one new subscription here. 

Thence I went to Birmingham, and 
then on to Detroit. On Sunday morning 
I preached for the Free Methodists on 



"Separation.''' The Lord blessed His 
Word abundantly. I have never yet seen 
a Free Methodist who would flinch when 
hearing truths about secrecy. On Mon- 
day I canvassed for the Cynosure and 
looked after old subscribers. Some of 
the old ones renewed their subscriptions 
who had discontinued them. In the af- 
ternoon I gave an address on "Lodg*e 
Initiations" to a Lutheran school. Chil- 
dren seem to appreciate instruction on 
lodgery, too. On Tuesday evening I 
spoke again for the Free Methodists, and 
got some more subscriptions for Cyno- 
sure. 

My next stopping place was Muske- 
gon, where the General Synod of the 
Christian Reformed church was con- 
vened. Amid the press of much busi- 
ness, they kindly gave me a few minutes 
to present the needs of our cause. I em- 
phasized to them the need of literature on 
the subject of secrecy being scattered f al- 
and wide, and also the need of the work 
being better supported. I got several 
new subscriptions for the Cynosure, as 
well as sold a number of books. 

While here in Muskegon this time I 
had the privilege of addressing the Res- 
cue Mission. I spoke to them, too, on 
"Separation from the W r orld," for so 
many of the rescued go back into the 
world because they continue to be mixed 
up in various associations with it. 

My next point of labor was Hart. On 
Sunday I preached at Oceana Center, for 
the Wesleyans. They, too, seem to relish 
new light on secrecy. 

I then returned to Muskegon, Grand 
Haven and Grand Rapids. At each of 
these places I looked after the interests 
of the Cynosure, securing new subscrip- 
tions as well as getting renewals, besides 
distributing tracts ; and at most places I 
sold books. 

From there I went to Whittemore. I 
distributed tracts through the town, and 
took a subscription for the Cynosure. 

On July 4 I preached on "Real Chris- 
tion Liberty," and showed that it frees 
us from lodge bondage as well as all oth- 
er kinds. On the 5th I preached at the 
same grove meeting. Had a glorious 
time. One came to the altar and profess- 
ed to find forgiveness. 



August, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



125 



On Monday night I spoke on temper- 
ance and on secrecy. After the temper- 
ance meeting it began to rain hard. While 
people were waiting I gave an address on 
Orangeism. On Wednesday night I 
spoke on "The Principles of Oddfellow- 
ship." After I got through nearly all the 
Oddfellows but one, a drunken man, 
came up to argue. On Friday night not 
a single lodge man or woman was out to 
hear my address on "Christian Charity 
versus Lodge Selfishness." They had 
gotten enough. 

On Sunday morning I preached at 
Melita Free Methodist church, and had a 
glorious time. In the evening I spoke at 
the Maple Ridge Free Methodist church, 
to a houseful, many of whom were lodge- 
men. 

On Tuesday I returned to Melita. On 
Wednesday night, at that place, I gave 
another address on "Lodge Principles," 
to a large, quiet, attentive audience. But 
though quiet, the lodge folks were very 
mad. 

I got up a Cynosure club here and at 
Maple Ridge. Antisecrecy has grown 
fast since my addresses here last year. 

Yours for victory, 

G. A. Pegram. 



President Blanchard is to have a 
week's meetings in Pennsylvania, from 
July 28th to August 3d. The week will 
be devoted to work against secret socie- 
ties. Rev. E. R. Dodd, of Forksville, has 
arranged for the campaign. The Presi- 
dent writes the editor: "Pray for us. 
God has helped me wonderfully some- 
times in that State; and I am anxious 
that this should be better than all that 
has gone before." 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., July 7, 1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips : 

This is to let you know that I am still 
fighting all sin. I was at Collier, Arkan- 
sas, the second Sunday in last month, vis- 
iting the sisters' Bible Band at Rev. W. 
L. Grant's church. Rev. Grant preach- 
ed a wonderful sermon against the lodge ; 
text, "Come out of her, my people" (Rev. 
18: 4). Pie was meek and gentle, still 
some of the lodge-members got mad. One 



of his deacons got up as soon as he sat 
down, and tried to defend the Oddfel- 
lows' lodge, right there in the church. 
He said no true Oddfellow would say 
Amen to such a sermon. He tried to 
raise a fuss in the church, but Deacon 
Wade stopped him. A good many of the 
church-members belong to the secret so- 
cieties, but they said, "If we are wrong, 
we want to know it ; and whom have we 
got to tell us but the preacher?" They 
said, "Rev. Grant is a preacher sent from 
God, and we will hear him ; we want a 
preacher that is not afraid to condemn 
sin." The deacon that got so mad is No- 
ble Grand in the Oddfellows' lodge. The 
members of the church were disgusted 
with him and said some straight things to 
him. He got ashamed and tried to beg 
off; but they said, "This is not the first 
time you have tried to insult Rev. Grant 
since he came to take this church, be- 
cause he won't compromise with the dev- 
il." 

I spoke in the evening. I met these 
same people last year and some of them 
said if I came down that river any more 
they were going to kill me ; but not so 
this time ; they have been reading their 
Bibles and have found that what I said 
was true ; so they heard me gladly and 
said the lodges were a fraud, just to get 
men's money. I don't have any fight 
now, only when I strike a new field. The 
Christians in the churches are all friends 
to me. Even the sinners are friends to 
me. The fight is with the grand-daddies 
of the lodge. The people generally are 
losing heart in their lodges ; many wom- 
en have quit them, and women who have 
never belonged to any say they never 
will. I took my Blbie and showed them 
that the Word of God was not a secret or 
private matter; it is to be proclaimd on 
the housetops, not to just a few Masons 
or Oddfellows. When the people looked 
into the matter they said, "You are right ; 
go on and teach us the right way. We 
are your friends." 

The next Sunday I was again in the 
neighborhood of Elerson. One of the 
ministers went up in the lodge temple 
after I had lectured here and told the 
sisters, "You let that woman come here 
and scare you out of the lodge." One 



320 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1008. 



sister said, "I am God's child, and I am 
afraid of God's Word ; I don't want to 
disobey my heavenly Father." She said, 
"The lodge can have my three hundred 
dollars. Give me Jesus." So she quit at 
once. 

The lodge is getting weaker here in 
Pine Bluff. The white ministers invited 
the colored ministers to meet with them 
the Sunday before last, and they decided 
to all preach the gospel. They are all go- 
ing to preach the same thing. They said 
in that council that every organization 
would have to go down before God's 
church. The white ministers and the col- 
ored ministers are denouncing everything 
but the church. They have combined to 
put whiskey out of Pine Bluff. I think 
the Eagles will have to make their nest 
somewhere else to hatch their drinking 
brood. The lodges have got to go. The 
lodge hatches young ones for the sa- 
loon ; and the saloon hatches young ones 
for the prison and disreputable houses ; 
and they go from these places to hell. 
The colored M. E. church has passed a 
resolution not to let the lodges have a 
ceremony over the dead in their church- 
es. If they have a ceremony, they will 
have to have it in their own temples. 

God bless you and all the speakers at 
the Convention. God bless Brother 
Blanchard. I wish he would come south 
and help to pull the church out of spir- 
itual Babylon. "By the rivers of Baby- 
lon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, 
when we remembered Zion" (Psalm 137: 

0'- 



July 16, 1908. 

I was over to Altheimer, Arkansas, 
last week, holding a series of meetings 
with the women and children. Our meet- 
ings began Thursday morning and ; lasted 
until Sunday. We made house to house 
visits in the morning and met at the 
church every evening for Bible study. 
The pastor of the colored Baptist church 
here had a great battle with Satan to keep 
01.1t the annual lodge sermon. The lodge- 
members brought the matter to Rev. 
Lindsay, wanting him to put it before 
the church whether they could have the 
sermon in Mount Zion church or 
not. Rev. D. L. Lindsay is a man of 



God and a preacher of righteousness. 
When the matter was brought before the 
church to take a vote on it, Rev. Lindsay 
looked up at his hat and grip, and said, 
"I am the pastor ,'of this church, ifepjgfi 
won't be any longer if that sermon of the 
devil's is preached here; I will take my 
hat and grip and get out." He said, "The 
Baptists of this State adopted a law to 
stop these annual sermont in the church- 
es, and the churches I pastor will not 
have them." The vote was taken, any- 
way, and seventy- four voted against it 
and four for it. So the lodge had to go 
to the hall with their annual sermon. 

We women had a great Bible meet- 
ing. We had Dr. Rogers of Pine Bluff, 
and Rev. Lindsay and wife of Jefferson 
Springs, Arkansas. The lodge is getting 
pretty weak here. There are some peo- 
ple in the lodge who are Christians, and 
they don't know the lodge is idolatry; 
but when they find it out, they are willing 
to give it up. I know over fifteen [at 
this place?] who have given it up since I 
have been traveling as a home mission- 
ary. I give them the tracts you senckme 
and some quit at once. One sister at 
Elerson gave up her lodge after I lec- 
tured at that place. She said she would 
not go to hell for three hundred dollars 
of lodge insurance. One at Jefferson 
Springs quit after she had been in the 
lodge for ten years. She said she never 
liked the lodge, but went into it to please 
her husband ; now she came out of it to 
please God. 

Last Saturday evening a gentleman 
came around to where Sister Lindsay 
was stopping and told her that he had 
just come from the railroad station and 
that the men were saying many mean 
things about Sister Woods being in Al- 
theimer, teaching Bible . lessons against 
the lodges. Sister Lindsay has been a 
missionary for years. She laughed a*n*d v 
said, "Don't you know that God's Word 
will stir the people up?" He said, "But 
I am afraid they will kill Sister Woods." 
She said, "Yes, maybe they will ; but she 
cannot stop teaching God's Word for 
that. We are doing business for God." 
When I Came in Sister Lindsay told me 
what this gentleman had said, and we re- 
joiced over it, that we were counted wor- 
thy to suffer for Jesus. 



August, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



127 



Rev. Lindsay preached Sunday morn- 
ing, and I lectured to the people in the 
afternoon. They said they would not 
come to the meeting, but at 3 o'clock 
those brothers were there to hear their 
doom on the lodge question. I first took 
up the sins that people call "no harm" 
sins, such as foolish talking and jesting 
(Ephesians 5: 4), bitterness, wrath, and 
anger (Ephesians 4: 31). I told them 
I did not want to hurt their feelings ; I 
wanted to be gentle ; but that I must tell 
them the truth in meekness ( II. Timothy 
2: 24-26). I told them, "These words 
will judge you at the last day. This 
Book will be opened, and if you have not 
obeyed its teaching you will be lost. If 
you are guilty now, you have a chance to 
turn to God ; but if you wait till the great 
judgment day, this Book will be opened, 
and another book will be opened (Reve- 
lation 20: 12), and you will be judged, 
and there will be no chance for you 
then." As I looked on that congrega- 
tion I could not keep back the tears ; I 
nearly broke down. I looked at our dea- 
cons. They are deacons in the church, 
and Senior Deacons in the Masonic 
lodge, and Junior Deacons, and Wardens, 
and Worshipful Masters. I was sad at 
heart to see how the devil has got Peter 
chained to his soldiers (Acts 12: 6). The 
Holy Ghost used me wonderfully. Some 
of those strong men shed tears, and wom- 
en cried outright. When I sat down Rev. 
Lindsay said, "The missionary has told 
you the truth ; let us give her a collec- 
tion.''* These very men that said they 
would not give me anything, even if I 
were dying, gave liberally. 

After the meeting a Royal Arch Ma- 
son walked up to me and said, "God bless 
you. That lecture is worth a hundred 
dollars." He said, "I am a Royal Arch 
Mason, and swore to have my skull smit- 
ten off and my brain exposed to the 
scorching sun, if I did not uphold my 
lodge brother in everything he might 
do." He said, "That is why I left Ma- 
sonry, and I don't care who knows that 
I am out and telling it. It was a coven- 
ant with hell, and I have broken it. 
Thank God, I am out, and I am going to 
stay out." 

Yours for the Master's work, 

(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



STATE CONFERENCES. 

The Michigan State Convention will 
be held (D. V.) on October 7th and 8th, 
at Grand Rapids, in the Lagrave Street 
Christian Reformed church. Rev. Henry 
Beets, pastor. Secretary A. R. Merrill 
writes that "arrangements are being 
made for a large Convention. Good 
speakers of both State and National rep- 
utation will be heard." 



The plan of holding a Conference in 
Kansas City has not met with sufficient 
encouragement to insure the undertaking 
for September. 



The New York-New Jersey Conven- 
tion will doubtless be held in October. 



Correspondence with Iowa people 
looks rather towards a Convention at Os- 
kaloosa in October. The encouragement 
for a Convention in northwestern Iowa 
was too little to make success probable. 



Friends at Sabetha, Kansas, have sug- 
gested a Convention there in October. 



We call the attention of friends in In- 
diana to their President's letter in this 
number. How many favor a Convention 
in November in Indiana, at Fairmount? 



Your foes will not fear you as long as 
you fret over them. 



A man's age depends on the ideals he 
still cherishes. 



Silence will end almost any quarrel. 



THE HATCHET 

A Monthly Magazine 

Strikes at all Evil. It is 
fighting the LiquorTraf- 
fic, Tobacco and Impurity 

Department Exposing - Mason ry, one 
devoted to the Home, one to Health, etc. 

EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY 

CARRY A. NATION 

50 cents A Year, 3 Months Trial 10c 

Send for sample. Agents wanted. 
Address: 217 D St. N. W . Washington. D. C. 



12S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



August, 1908. 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 



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SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING T ODGES 



:i,i$M'y ■ rtf< *' t 



FOR SALE BY 

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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of v 31t$ Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of BLue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several, of them full-page— give a pictorial re- 
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monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete Work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
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ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
^hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
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unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 



OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each 
degree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual 
corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
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$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIx 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 
ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
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Degree; with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 cents; 
paper, 35 cents. 



f 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
pages, in cloth, $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
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hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
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object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
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work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
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proper manner of conducting the business of the 
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MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
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ECCE ORIENTI. 

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FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
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G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
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OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
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ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 

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By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
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THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 10 pages ; 5 cents. 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. H. II. Illnman, showing 
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and on free speech : interference with justice In 
courts, etc. 20 cents. 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS- 

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Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
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EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

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BAPTE T TESTIMONIES. 

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ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE. 

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. The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
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WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

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CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddf ellowship ? Ought Christians to 
Perform Acts of Beneficence and Charity as Odd- 
fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
man. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. 

WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

By Rev. J. Blanchard. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents; a package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE "GOOD MAN " ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Other Man's Conscience — 
Which Should We Follow ? 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE STRANGE CASE OF MR. GOODMAN. 

"Why Are There So Many Good Men in 
Secret Societies?" The Question Answered. 13 
< pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 
25 for 25 cents. 

ARE INSURANCE LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra- 
tion. 4 pages; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

OUGHT CHRISTIANS TO HOLD MEMBER- 
SHIP IN MODERN WOODMEN OF 
AMERICA? 

Extracts from History and Official Ritual 
of the order, showing its relation to Christianity. 
4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate in -Them? 4 
pages; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonie 
Penalties ; Are Masonic Penalties Ever Enforced ? 
Masonic Arrogance ; Masonic Despotism ; Grand 
Lodge Powers ; Disloyalty to Country ; Our Re- 
sponsibility as Christians; What Can Be Done? 
16 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

FOES OF THE CHRISTIAN SABBATH. 

A word on the common desecration of the 
Sabbath. Secret societies prominent in its pro- 
fanation. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. 
A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

A package containing one of each 
of the above tracts will be sent, 
postpaid, for 25 cents. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. Madison Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 







SAMUEL D. GREENE 

At the time of Morgan's death Mr. Greene was 
President of the Board of Trustees of the Village of 
Batavia, N. Y.; member of the Presbyterian church; 
member of the Masonic lodge cf Batavia, with Mor- 
gan, and present during- the discussion as to his 
murder. (Next month we will publish an extended 
sketch). 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $ 1 .00," three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
.and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicago, DL, under Act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



John W. Kern, Vice-Presidential Nomi- 
nee, Democratic Party 129 

W. J. Bryan and the Jynights of Aksorben . *120 

Taf t's Religion .' 121) 

Benign Order of Bats *129 

A Brave Orator 129 • 

United States Buddhists 130 

Elk Statistics 130 

A Disgraceful Affair .130 

State Control of Labor Unions Advocated . 130 

Prison for Teamster Shea 130 

Elder David Bernard on Freemasonry. . .*131 

A Baptist Loyola 131 

"Men's Church" Makes Sunday Like Lodge 

Night ; 132 

Alien Segregation 132 

Tribute to R. A. Cullor 133 

The True Brotherhood. By Rev. H. H. 

Hinman 134 

Pythian Knights in Boston. By Rev. J. 

P. Stoddard 134 

Knights of Pythias. By Rev. J. M. Foster. 136 

President Blanchard's Letter 137 

Seceders' Conference — 
Why I Left the Oddfellows. By Rev. 

S. H. Swartz 142 

Rev. E. P. Kuhl :14G 

A. W. Hunter 147 

Robert Cunningham . 148 

News of Our Work 149 

State Conventions 149 

Our Allies. By J. M. Hitchcock 149 

The Lodge, One Great Counterfeit. By 

Rev. J. W. Brink .150 

Iowa State Convention Programme. .... .151 

Michigan State Convention . ; 152 

Agent, Pegram's Report > . . . 152 

Secretary Stoddard's Letter 153 

From Agent Davidson . 154 



Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter . ..... 154 

A Wesleyan Word on the N. C. A. Conven- 

. tion in Ohio 156 

Officers of the National and State Chris- 
tian Associations 156-157 

Massachusetts Act Relative to the Fraud- 
ulent Use of Names of Fraternities, 

Etc, 157 

New Masonic Law Tested 15S 

The Massachusetts Law 159 

SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D„ 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis r 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

SERMON ON SECRETISM. 

By Rev. Theo. Cross, pastor Congregational 
church, Hamilton, N. Y. This is a very clear pres- 
entation of the objections to all secret societies, 
and to Masonry especially, that are apparent to 
all. 5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY A FOURFOLD CONSPIR- 
ACY. 

Address of President J. Blanchard. xThis i» 
a most convincing argument against the\L.odge. 
16 pages ; 5 cents. 
A. O. U. W. RITUAL. 

The secret ceremonies, prayers, songs, etc x 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen haver 
been taken from the columns of the Christian Cyno- 
sure and published in pamphlet form. While not 
strictly accurate, it is substantially true, and as 
such is vouched for by Rev. S. A. Scarvie, of 
Decorah, Iowa (R. F. D. 6), a very excellent 
Christian gentleman, and a seceder for -conscience* 
sake from this order. 10 cents. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 
special object of this sermon is to show the right 
and duty of Christians to inquire into the, real 
character of secret societies, no matter what 
objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

PRES. H. H. GEORGE ON SECRET SOCIE- 
TIES. 

A powerful address, showing clearly the duty 
of Christian churches to disfellowship secret so- 
cieties. 10 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris- 
tian religion. By President J. Blanchard. The 
un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shiping Freemasons in the Christian Church. 10> 
cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY, 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by Ex-President Charles G. Finney, 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian* This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth,, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, HI, 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, SEPTEMBER, 1908. 



NUMBER 5 



JOHN W. KERN, 

Vice=Presidential Nominee, Democratic 

Party. 

Courteous replies were received from 
each of the candidates written to as per 
statement in the August Cynosure, ex- 
cept Mr. Kern. The public press credit 
him with being a 33rd degree Free 
Mason, a Knight of Pythias and a prom- 
inent member of the Elks. 



Mr. W. J. Bryan prates much about 
taking the common people into his con- 
fidence. He should remember that there 
are about fifteen millions of electors 
who are patiently waiting to learn the 
advantages of membership in the 
"Knights of Aksorben," into which he 
has been recently initiated. As Mr. Bry- 
an is a great commoner and advocate of 
publicity, he will surely speak of the 
advantages of this new organization to 
the plebeians of our land. 



TAFT'S RELIGION. 

Washington, June 17 — The fact that 
Secretary Taft is a Unitarian has been 
printed, but in order to make it official 
a statement was given out at the White 
House to-day. The statement adds that 
Mr. Taft also frequently attends the 
Episcopal church of which his wife is a 
member, and that at his summer home 
in Murray Bay, Canada, he has taken 
great interest in the Presbyterian 
Church. 

Friends of the Secretary also pointed 
out after the statement had been issued 
that his actions in the Philippines friars' 
land cases had shown his friendship for 
Catholics, and one especially close to 
Secretary Taft said he had often heard 
him speak highly of the Methodists. 

As a boy in Cincinnati Mr. Taft some- 



times attended the German Lutheran 
Sunday school with his boy playmates, 
and among his most valued advisers are 
several Baptists of prominence. 

On more than one occasion the Sec- 
retary has accompanied President Roose- 
velt to the Dutch Reformed Church in 
Washington. 

It might be attested that Mr. Taft 
has attended weddings and funerals in 
the churches of practically all the va- 
rious religious denominations. — Post 
Dispatch. 



A new secret society called the "Benign 
Order of Bats" has just been organized. 



In this number will be found the new 
Massachusetts law, by which one set of 
Masons have secured an advantage over 
another. This new law is already being 
tested. Mr. Charles W. Writer has 
been arrested, and he declares that he 
will carry his case to the last court. It 
is a case of "Kilkenny Cats," who, ac- 
cording to the story, fought until only 
their tails were left. So mote it be! 



A BRAVE ORATOR. 

The North American in its issue of 
May 25 reports that a Y. M. C. A. ora- 
tor declares the secret orders are rivals 
and enemies of God's church. The re- 
port says : 

Denouncing as a reversion to bar- 
barism the custom of certain lodges to 
speak of the realm to which dead mem- 
bers pass as the "Big Nest," the "Great 
Herd" or the "Happy Hunting Ground," 
the Rev. Alvin Orr, speaking before the 
men's meeting of the Kensington Y. M. 
C. A. yesterday afternoon, said that such 
organizations were of the greatest ene- 
mies the church has among the working- 
men. 



130 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



They are educating a vast number of 
men away from Christ and the church. 
Their very habit of referring to what 
Christians know as heaven by a pagan 
or a humorous term is an instance of 
the tendency which does the church and 
the workingman great harm. 



UNITED STATES BUDDHISTS. 

Within a short time it is said work 
will be begun on the Buddhist Temple. 
in Seattle ; it being the first in the United 
States. The Japanese pastor of the so- 
ciety is now in Japan drumming up 
funds. When he returns he will bring 
with him an image of Buddha and place 
it in the proposed chapel. Nearly all the 
members of the society are Japanese, 
albeit the president is a woman of Scan- 
dinavian origin. In New York, under 
the stimulus of Wu Ting Fang, the 
Chinese Minister to this country, the 
Chinese are planning to build a Confuc- 
ian temple. 



ELK STATISTICS. 

The annual report of the grand ex- 
alted ruler, John K. Tener of Charleroi, 
shows that- during the year the Elks re- 
ceived by affiliation or initiation 46,345 
members, 264 were suspended or expell- 
ed, 8,208 were stricken from the rolls for 
non-payment of dues ; 5,368 demitted and 
2,718 died. 

- Forty- four new lodges have been added 
to the list with an increase of 29,789 in 
membership, making the total number of 
lodges to-day 1,125 with a total member- 
ship of 284,321. 



A DISGRACEFUL AFFAIR. 

The Rev. Mervin Jacobs, who was de- 
posed from the pulpit of the Baptist 
Church in Pine Plains, N. Y., for joining 
the Elks, stood guard with Mrs. Frank 
Husted in the house of the latter at Pine 
Plains last Saturday night, each with a 
loaded revolver, while white-caps pelted 
the house with eggs and smeared the 
piazza with tar and feathers. 

Whether the latter were intended to 
form a garment for the minister is not 
known, but the determined attitude of 
Mr. Jacobs, arid the fact that he and his 
hostess were armed, took the raiders bv 



surprise and they dispersed without at- 
tempting to force their way into Mrs. 
Husted's house. 

Mr. Jacobs, who is chaplain of Pongh- 
keepsie lodge of Elks, was given a dem- 
onstration when he preached his farewell 
sermon at Pine Plains in June. Locked 
out of the Baptist church, the town hall 
was hired, and there the dominie preach- 
ed to 300 Elks and their wives who had 
gone by special train to hear him. 



STATE CONTROL ADVOCATED. 

At the Massachusetts State House, 
October eighth, the rights of strike- 
breakers, the responsibilities of . union 
men, and the question of supervising 
labor organizations were discussed be- 
fore the recess committee on labor. 
Among those heard at the morning ses- 
sion on the suggested changes in the law 
on injunctions, and on the proposal to 
allow peaceful picketing, was Secretary 
Sayward of the Master Builders' Associ- 
ation, who said : 

"Trades unions operate as do no other 
combinations in interference with the 
freedom of the individual in the matter 
of employment, as well as in embarrass- 
ing the conduct of business in such a 
manner that even processes of injunc- 
tion cannot be made effective. It may be 
difficult and perhaps impossible to so in- 
corporate them as to secure the com- 
munity against their improper acts, but- 
the affairs of such bodies should at all 
times be open to inspection by, and sub- 
ject to the control and direction of, 
proper officers of the state." 
• Isaac Woodbury, contractor, claimed 
that labor would take the advantage to 
make even more trouble if the injunction 
process was done away with. An at- 
torney reported that only six injunctions 
had been asked for in fifty-eight strikes. 
Democrats please copy. 



PRISON FOR TEAMSTER SHEA. 

Family of Labor Leader Says He Let 
Them Starve. 

Boston, Mass., July 23. — ( Special. ).— Cor- 
nelius P. Shea, former international presi- 
dent of the teamsters' union, was to-day sen-, 
fenced to six months in the house of correc- 
tion for hot supporting his wife and two ehil- 



September; 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



131 



dren. He appealed from the sentence and 
was held in $500 to the Superior Court. 

Shea was arraigned this morning before 
Judge Preble in the Charlestown District 
Court on a charge brought by his wife, Mary. 

Mrs. Shea and her two little girls, Mar- 
garet, aged 32, and Genevieve, aged 8, testi- 
fied against the father. Mrs. Shea and both 
the children were neatly dressed. Mrs. Shea 
told the court that her husband had done ab- 
solutely nothing for the support of herself 
and her children and that she had been 
obliged to sell her furniture piece by piece to 
get money for food. 

"Only this morning," said Mrs. Shea be- 
tween sobs, "I was obliged to sell the screens 
from the windows for $1 in order to get 
money enough for our breakfasts." 

Shea told the court in his own defense that 
he was unable to get work and had been sick 
for some time. He said he had been getting 
along himself by earning a spare dollar or 
two now and then and by borrowing from his 
friends. Asked why he didn't borrow enough 
for the support of his family, he said that 
he didn't want to. 

In summing the evidence Judge Preble said 
that. Shea appeared to be able-bodied, and 
while he was out of work he seemed to be 
able to take care of himself. 

"You earned a few dollars occasionally," 
said the judge, "but instead of getting home 
with the money stayed in town, increasing ex- 
penses by separate lodgings. I don't think 
six months in the house of correction is any 
too much for you." 

Shea is the man that ruled Chicago, 
1906, during the Teamsters' Strike, when 
many were killed and many injured. The 
strike did not have one justifiable reason 
and it is believed only assumed the ugly 
proportions that it did, through the sub- 
serviency and poltroonery of our Demo- 
cratic mayor. The character of Shea is 
shown by the court proceedings narrated 

above. • 

• : _ — _ — i 



"It will readily be admitted that the 
existence of the institution, [Free Mas- 
onry] depends upon the keeping of its 
secrets inviolate. It will follow, then, 
that if the existence of the institution is 
necessary, or has a tendency to promote 
God ? s- glory and the well-being of society, 
the principles of moral obligation re- 
quire me to keep its secrets, and by re- 
vealing them I am guilty of moral per- 
jury! Arid on the other hand, if the 
institution is corrupt, has an evil tend- 



ency, and is opposed to the order and 
well-being of society and the glory of 
God, I am under moral obligation to 
break my oaths, and reveal its secrets to 
the world, that it may come to an end. 
My refusal to meet with or support the 
institution, is not sufficient; I must re- 
nounce fealty to the order, reveal its 
secrets, oppose its influence, and use my 
exertions to destroy it, or I am guilty 
of a violation of moral obligation. 

"Let the reader carefully and thor- 
oughly examine the following documents 
and he will discover that Free Masonry, 
as a system, is dark, unfruitful, selfish, 
demoralizing, blasphemous, murderous, 
anti-republican, and anti-Christian — op- 
posed to the glory of God and the good 
of mankind; and hence the compiler in 
bursting asunder the bands of the fra- 
ternity and publishing their secrets to 
the world, is doing no more than is re- 
quired by the principles of moral ob- 
ligation — is but fulfilling the duties 
which he owes to God and his fellow 
men. David Bernard. 

"Warsaw (N. Y.) April 1, 1829." 
— From Introduction to "Light on Free 
Masonry!' by Elder David Bernard. 



A BAPTIST LOYOLA. 

Within a short distance of the house 
in which General Joseph Warren slept 
the night before he died at Bunker Hill, 
and opposite the spot where the colonial 
assembly met, is a Sunday-school whose 
superintendent is reported by The 
Watchman, of Boston, to have organized 
a society of boyish Knights, combining 
the three features, military, secret socie- 
ty, and Biblical. 

The Sunday-school itself was already 
Biblical. Military organization and se- 
crecy are added. The additional features 
are precisely those of the Jesuit order. 

Ignatius Loyola, who had been a sol- 
dier, conceived the idea of a religious 
order framed on the military model. It 
was founded in the midst of that century, 
when Rome was struggling against the. 
new Protestant Reformation. In chap- 
ter II of "Modern Secret Societies/' 
President Blanchard says: "The Society 
of Jesus was formed by Ignatius Loyola 
about 1540, and was the mightiest agent 
used by the church of Rome in checking 



332 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSDRE. 



September, .1908. 



the progress of the Protestant Reforma- 
tion. That order, though banished for 
its interference with civil government 
from almost every country in Europe, 
still exists, and is one of the most power- 
ful political agencies of our time. As it 
is the representative of a foreign church, 
so it is composed very largely of foreign- 
born persons, and is essentially alien in 
its membership as well as its principles." 

The two foundation stones of this ear- 
lier religious order, military organism 
and secrecy, have at this late day been 
brought out of the dark ages to be im- 
ported into a twentieth-century Sunday- 
school. Yet a Protestant Sunday-school 
has hitherto been supposed to have for 
its special feature the diffusion of light. 
Why should a section of that school be 
now separated from the rest, to be cov- 
ered with an extinguisher? It seems a 
violent self-contradiction that intrudes 
such an anomaly into the Sunday-school. 

Since this is one of those things liable 
to be copied and become for awhile a fad, 
the question starts up, whether the socie- 
ties that have made so much trouble in 
public schools, and have been cast out ail 
over the country as an abomination to 
be endured by educators no longer, are to 
find refuge in Sunday-schools. 



'MEN'S CHURCH." 

>Vives Protest That Smoking Service 

.Makes Sunday a Duplicate of 

Lodge Night. 

Atlantic City, N. J., July 29. 
Claiming that the "men's church," in 
which husbands and fathers are allowed 
to smoke and loll in shirt sleeves, is 
too attractive, a score of wives have 
protested to the Rev, Sydney Goodman, 
pastor of the new idea congregation, 
that their husbands would rather go to 
church than stay at home. The. protest 
took the form of a letter read before 
the male congregation by the rector 
last night, but he refused to give out 
the names of the irate wives who made 
the protest. 

"Church is all right for men but our 
husbands are staying out as late Sun- 
day night to . attend your service as they 
do en , lodge nights/' said -the letter. 
We insist that some of the attractions 



be cut or else the services be cut down 
so that they can get home in decent 
time." 

So pleasant have been the weekly 
Sunday night meetings of the Men's 
Church that the men have insisted on 
the services being strung out longer and 
longer, with the fine programs of music 
and singing interspersed with moving 
pictures, soft drinks and cigars, which 
latter have become an important part 
of the services. 



ALIEN SEGREGATION. 

Early in August, a lodge of the new 
Italo-American Order of Protection was 
formed at a hotel in a city o.f New Eng- 
land, the object of the leader in this new 
enterprise, John B. Breglio, being to 
form an Italo-American order of national 
scope, to unite Italians in America in an 
organized band. This is to be like other 
secret orders already here. 

It is'the desire of those responsible for 
its organization, that all sectional or part- 
isan feeling, brought here from. Italy and 
previously existing there, where residents 
of one province are prejudiced against 
those of another, may wholly disappear 
from view. Yet it is nevertheless order- 
ed that the Italian language be used in all 
meetings of the order. The natural ef- 
fect of this secret society seems liable, 
not to say likely, to be the segregation of 
Italians. This would probably hinder 
their assimilation with Americans. If 
Jesuits control, such a result may be de- 
sirable in their eyes. The secret society, 
being an alien importation from the be- 
ginning, may in this case be an agent in 
keeping immigrants aliens. 



4( 



When we first notify you that your sub- 
scription will expire, you should send your 
renewal at once, in order not to miss a num- 
ber, and also for the sake of sustaining the 
Cause which the Cynosure represents. 

The new post-office regulation makes it nec- 
essary that you should pay strictly in ad- 
vance, or promise to pay and do so within 
four months. We wish to extend the thanks 
of the Association to those who have respond- 
ed to our request for renewals for more than 
one year. That means a real saving of ex- 
pense, and the money can be used for the pro- 
motion of the object for which we all work 
and give. _. .♦ 



September, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



133 



TRIBUTE TO R. A. CULLOR. 

To the National Christian Associa- 
tion : 
God has been pleased to call home one 
of your strongest helpers, Mr. R. A. 
Cullor, of northern Missouri. He was a 



^ «o, .. - — s .- r - 














HH 




'jeC^WF^ 


'■ '^^B 1 - HE 






fj 






■ 









R. A. CULLOR. 

native-born, true American. He actually 
believed . that God's three institutions 
were all that men needed in this world, 
so far as organizations are needed ; that 
these are all that we poor earth-creatures 
are possibly able to honor while here, and 
therefore it is dishonoring them and dis- 
gracing one's self to go into or encour- 
age any kind of clannish, secrejt organ- 
ization. 

Secret organizations reject the name 
of Jesus, not only in their lodge prayers, 
but under the solemnity of death, at their 
heathen burials. So our faithful Brother 
Cullor took much pains to read to lodge- 
men these scriptures : "Whosoever de- 
nieth the Son, the same hath not the 
Father." "Whosoever shall deny Me be- 
fore men. him will I also deny before My 



Father which is in heaven." (I. John 
2:23; Matthew 10:33.) He would put 
them to shame, and urge them to read: 
"Every spirit that confesseth not that 
Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not of 
God : and this is that spirit of antichrist, 
whereof ye have heard that it should 
come." (I; John 4:3.) A church, 
preacher, deacon, or member, who went 
into lodgery, or communed therewith, he 
would not knowingly partake with, and 
would live alone rather than do so. (See 
I. Corinthians 5; II. Corinthians 6:14; 
Ephesians 5 : 1 1 . ) 

Like a true man, he disdained, spurn- 
ed, and treated with firm contempt, the 
work of Satan and his servants, who 
seek to swear or pledge the husband, 
father, brother, or neighbor, to clannish 
secrecy, thereby sealing the mouth of the 
husband to and against his wife, children, 
or brethren, in violation of the God-given 
and American constitutional right of men 
to freely speak and counsel and advise 
each other in every needful line of proper 
interest in the family, the church, and the 
nation. 

Apart from and against all these de- 
luding", corrupting, debauching, degrad- 
ing and destructive combinations — 
paganism (lodgery). rum, and Roman- 
ism — Brother Cullor stood like adamant, 
or as a great oak in the forest, unmoved. 
As a hero he defended the family, the 
state, and the church. The institutions 
of God and American duty were above 
all with him. For them he lived, he 
labored, he suffered, as a son, as a 
brother, as a husband, father, citizen, and 
veteran United States soldier. He suf- 
fered loss of property by fire ; his stock 
was poisoned and the tongues of. his cat- 
tle cut out; thieves took almost every- 
thing they could get — hogs, sheep, cattle, 
even to sixteen head of fine steers at 
once ; he suffered by trumped-up law- 
suits ; by opposition to and derangement 
of his business ; by abuse of his family. 
Yet, as in Job's case, his herds wonder- 
fully increased, more than ever, so that 
he could divide liberally with his ten 
children. 

He was on a visit to his son Luther 
when the change came. I was holding 
meeting at his home church-house at the 



134 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



time of his death, and by request deliv- 
ered the address at the funeral (text, Co- 
lossians 3 11-4), to a large and very atten- 
tive audience. At the close of nearly an 
hour's talk, I urged the family and all 
present to remember that while the wife 
had lost a true husband, the children a 
father indeed, the community a neighbor 
in fact, and the nation a patriot, the in- 
stitutions of God had lost a heroic de- 
fender, leaving them a pattern of Ameri- 
can integrity such as the power of God 
would compel them to respect in memory. 
For such a wonderful gift of natural 
fortitude and firmness, not only the fam- 
ily but the whole community surely ought 
to be thankful to God. I told them they 
ought to weep for themselves and their 
children, not for him. 

He was laid to rest in the home ceme- 
tery. Many were present at the burial. 

(Elder) A. B. Lipp. 
Stall!, Mo, R. F. D. 1, July 20, 1908. 



Contribution 



THE TRUE BROTHERHOOD. 

BY REV. H. H. HTNMAN. 

The recent formation of a Congrega- 
tional Brotherhood, together with the or- 
ganization of other and similar Christian 
brotherhoods, -will, I hope, do something 
to prove the infinite superiority of our 
fellowship in Christ over all other fra- 
ternities, and their utter needlessness— -to 
say the least — to promote human welfare. 

"By this shall all men know that ye are 
My disciples, if ye have love one to an- 
other," The religion of our Lord is in- 
deed the. grandest system of brotherhood 
the world ever saw; and though often 
failing to show its true character to the 
world, it still has within the hearts of the 
Lord's people much of the spirit of broth- 
erly love- and kindness, which when ap- 
pealed to gives abundant evidence of life 
and efficiency. 

As an illustration I want to mention an 
incident in my own experience. In the 
fall of 18S1" I'. was on my way South to 
work for the N7 C A. I stopped at a 
small way-station in west Tennessee. It 
was just about sundown and I wanted to 
walk about - five mites where I should 



spend the night with a friend. I was 
soon lost in the woods, and wandered 
some hours in the darkness without 
finding a human habitation. At last I 
struck a road and followed it till I came 
to one of those large, double log houses, 
so common in the South. The usual 
company of dogs heralded my approach, 
and I was too familiar with the customs 
of the people to venture too near. 

I "halloaed the house" at a safe dist- 
ance, and soon a man came to the door 
and inquired what was wanted. I re- 
plied that I was a stranger in those parts, 
had been lost in the woods and wanted a 
night's lodging; that I had money and 
was quite willing to pay for my entertain- 
ment. 

I was told to go on — they did not wish 
to be disturbed. After some further 
parley I said, "I am a Christian and came 
here to do Christian work. Are you a 
Christian? If so, I appeal to you as a 
brother to take me in." 

At once the dogs were called off and I 
was told to come in. The great fireplace 
was opened up and the burning back-log 
gave out a genial heat. The good wife 
soon got up and prepared me a good 
supper and I was shown to a comfortable 
bed. In the morning, after breakfast 
and worship, the brother brought two 
horses and saddles and took me about ten 
miles to a place where I wanted to go. 
I urged him to name a price for his ser- 
vices, but he would receive nothing and 
was glad to aid in any Christian work. 
I have forgotten his name, but shall 
never forget his brotherly kindness. 

I wondered why men should want any 
other fraternity than this, and wished 
that all men might know the blessedness 
of fellowship in Christ. ., 

. Oberlin, O., May 18, 1908. 



PYTHIAN KNIGHTS IN BOSTON. 

BY REV. JAMES P. -STODDARD. 

Pythian Knights. are very much in evi- 
dence in Boston Just now. They, are said 
to" number eight thousand. - ; 

They began arriving last week, but on 
Ssqbbath the inpbu'r reached its ftoad-ti'de. 
Music and. marching kept 1 the depots and 
main thoroughfares in a continual, up- 
roar all day, and the tented "field to which 



September, .1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



135 



they were assigned was reported an ex- 
ceedingly busy place. 

Seventy acres of the city's property has 
been given up to them and to-day, when 
I visited the camp, it resembled the 
temporary quarters of a small army in the 
field. Tents and military headquarters 
were on a slightly elevated plateau, while 
the broad arena beyond was dotted over 
by a dozen or more companies exercising 
in a variety of evolutions in sword prac- 
tice, which, so far as I discovered, was 
the only death-dealing weapon with 
which they were equipped. Considering 
the peaceable character and humane rep- 
utation of the average citizen of Boston, 
this would seem adequate to insure the 
safekeeping of the lives and property of 
these valiant Knights. But according to 
press reports appearances are deceptive. 
Complaints of robberies have been numer- 
ous, and bitter accusations against the 
police force and city authorities are con- 
stantly appearing. The authorities are 
responding so far as possible to the cries 
of distress, but presumably not realizing 
the helplessness of these disciples of 
Damon and Pythias they were not pre- 
pared to furnish a standing army of blue 
coats to surround their encampment, -or 
men in citizens' clothing to act as body- 
guards to each individual Knight and the 
Elect Ladies, who form a no inconsider- 
able contingent to the Knightly horde, 
and who join most heartily in denuncia- 
tions of the police and city fathers. 

The sanitary conditions seemed to be 
good and the crowds orderly and well 
disposed. Most of the tents were occu- 
pied, some by families, others by men and 
women and still others by men only. It 
seemed much like a big camp meeting 
crowd, with the Christian element left 
out. Of course the decorations were im- 
mense and the outward appearance made 
as attractive as possible. The Grand 
Chancellor and his staff of high officials 
are at the Somerset and other fashion- 
able hotels in the citv. 
• There is no little curiosity among the 
people to learn what they may about this 
crowd of strangers that has -come among 
them. 

A number of prominent business 
houses' are decorated in recognition of 



their presence, but many less than I have 
seen on former occasions. 

The liquor industry has excelled all 
others in that respect. Not all the sa- 
loons in the city are decorated but I have 
counted 106, as I have gone about the 
streets, that throw out the flag of welcome 
to K. P.'s. Evidences of dissipation are 
not so apparent as they were when the 
Knights Templar Masons visited Boston, 
but it is fairly presumable that the liquor 
men know their business and do not ex- 
pend money in decorations without good 
reason to expect liberal patronage in re- 
turn. 

A gentleman who joined the K. P.'s 
sometime ago, called at 560 Columbus 
avenue, for conference with me. His 
conscience was ill at ease and though 
hardly pressed he had refused to join the 
parade. He said the order would not re- 
ceive brewers, saloonkeepers and drunk- 
ards, but when once admitted they were 
never disciplined or expelled for viola- 
tions of this restrictive law. They were 
allowed to do as they pleased. He felt 
that his lodge was becoming an intoler- 
able burden upon his conscience, and that 
it drew so heavily upon his time and re- 
sources that he would be compelled to 
sacrifice his time with his family at home, 
and sever his connection with his church 
altogether or leave his lodge. 

The pledges and representations by 
which he was induced to become a Knight 
of Pythias had proved delusive and only 
that fear of man, which bringeth a snare, 
deterred him from making a clean breast 
of the whole matter. Doubtless he rep- 
resents many who have been deluded into 
this and other secret lodges, and empha- 
sises the importance of our work in 
warning the unwary, informing the ig- 
norant and dispelling the fears of those 
who are convicted of sin and burdened 
in soul, but lack the moral stamina to cast 
off this onerous weight and boldly assert 
their manhood and Christian liberty. God 
hasten the day. 

Boston, Mass.. August 5, 1908. 



■■We cannot make our own standards of 
morals any more 'than we can trim 
our yardsticks to suit our pleasure. 



136 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. 

BY REV. J. M. FOSTER. 

. The encampment of 7,000 uniformed 
Knights, from every state and territory 
in the union and six Canadian provinces, 
began in Franklin Park Monday, August 
3, 1908, and continued for a week. 

They consumed 10,000 rolls of bread, a 
car load of cattle, 250 pounds of ham, 20 
barrels of potatoes and 600 quarts of cof- 
fee daily. They represented 8,000 lodges 
and 700,000 members. The Supreme 
Lodge of Massachusetts gave the officers 
of the encampment a reception in the Ho- 
tel Somerset on Tuesday morning. Gov- 
ernor Guild and Mayor Hibbard welcom- 
ed them on behalf of the commonwealth 
and city. Over 350 invitedguests were pres- 
ent. In the evening a grand reception 
was held in this hotel for the men. At 
the same hour the Supreme Temple of 
Pythian Sisters received at the hotel 
Brunswick. In the afternoon of Tuesday 
the uniformed Knights, with swords and 
bands of music, marched through the 
principal streets, preceded and followed 
by mounted police. This display of non- 
sense was witnessed by 200,000 people. 

On Wednesday forenoon another pa- 
rade was made through the city by both 
uniformed and citizen-dressed Knights. 
Three Knight officers fell from their 
horses and were injured, having imbibed 
too freely of the cup that flames, and 
others were in the twilight region be- 
tween those who are full of wisdom and 
those who are full of spirituous drink. A 
troop of hussars from St. Joseph, Mo., 
attracted attention. They rode large 
horses, wore great yellow plumes on 
their caps, and yellow braid on their 
sleeves and yellow sashes, just like wild 
Indian chiefs of the desert would do. 
Much was made of the fact that men who 
wore "the blue" and "the gray" in the 
"Civil War" marched together in the pro- 
cession and tented together in the city 
park. They complained that "yeggs" 
robbed them, and appealed to the mayor 
for police protection. But the police 
commissioner replied in an open letter to 
the general of the order, that his men 
placed their belongings in their tents and 
left them while they went out into the 
city, and of course thieves had every op- 



portunity ; and when the Knights return- 
ed, they found suit-cases gone, their re- 
turn tickets and changed raiment, all 
gone ; and it would be impossible for the 
Boston police force to guard every tent ; 
and if they would be safe they must ap- 
point details of their own men to stand 
guard. What shall we say of this order? 
It is 'Without a legitimate purpose. An 
organization must justify itself for tak- 
ing the time and money and energy of its 
members by having a great moral pur- 
pose worthy of the sacrifice. The Na- 
tional Christian Association has a great 
purpose, the destruction of the works of 
darkness and the establishment of the 
Kingdom of light. The National Reform 
Association has a worthy object, the en- 
thronement of the Lord Jesus Christ as 
King in the realm of political life. 

What is the purpose of the Knights of 
Pythias? It is not military. "Behold 
his bed, which is Solomon's. Three 
score valiant men are about it. They 
all hold swords, being expert in war. 
Every man hath his sword upon 
his thigh because of fear in the night." 
The safety of the King required that a 
bodyguard surround his person. The 
safety of this country is the excuse for 
keeping a standing army. But the 
Knights of Pythias serve no such an end. 
It is not philanthropy or benevolence. 
The Associated Charities, the W. C. T. 
U., the American Peace Society, have 
such purposes. But this order is exclus- 
ive. It only helps its own — and only its 
own who have paid up their lodge dues. 
The American Board offers in its home 
and foreign missions, to help the needy, 
the poor, the maimed, the halt and the 
blind. But this order will receive only 
the able-bodied and sound-minded, who 
have a reasonable prospect of helping 
themselves and the order for a long time 
to come. It is earthly and selfish in its 
character. It makes no effort to heal the 
open sore of race-hatred in our Southern 
states against our colored citizens, nor 
the bitter antipathy to the Mongolians on 
the Pacific slope, nor the fratricidal strife 
between the labor unions and correspond- 
ent trusts and commercialized syndicates. 
It is not patriotic. The War of the Re- 
bellion originated in the lodge room. Of 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



137 



this there is documentary evidence. It 
does not lift its hand to oppose the sa- 
loon in its destructive work. It is not a 
friend of the Sabbath, but an open 
enemy. It is not a witness for civic re- 
form. It is weighed in the balance and 
found wanting. 

lis secret methods are hostile to civil 
and religious liberty. The Savior said, 
when arraigned before the Jewish San- 
hedrim, in the night session held illegally 
by Annas, in their haste to try and con- 
demn our Lord, 'T ever spake openly — 
in secret have I said nothing." God's 
people are called to be His witnesses. To 
bind themselves to be silent as to the say- 
ings and doings of the lodge is out of 
harmony with this high calling. Dark- 
ness is an emblem of sin and depravity 
and misery. It is characteristic of 
Satan's kingdom. Secrecy is darkness. 
It is Satan's method. Christ came to 
destroy the works of the devil. And His 
people who are called out of darkness 
into His marvelous light, are to walk as 
children of the light henceforth, and no 
longer as the children of darkness. 
"Come out from among them and be ye 
separate and touch not the unclean thing, 
and I will receive you, saith the Lord." 
Neither Church nor State can afford to 
tolerate secret methods by Christian 
citizens. The Christian Church and the 
Christian State must bow to the will of 
the Head of the Church and the King of 
the nations. 

The secrecy of the lodge is very differ- 
ent from the privacy of the home or the 
business firm or the executive session of 
Congress. A man does not go to the 
street to change his shirt, and yet he 
wishes it to be known that he changes his 
linen. A business firm withholds from 
the public their business plans, until the 
end is accomplished. And when Con- 
gress has accomplished the purpose of 
its secret session all is made public. But 
no rights either public or private, are 
contravened by this temporary privacy. 
In the lodge, however, the case is differ- 
ent. The secrecy is permanent in their 
enclosure. And the officials of both 
Church and State are forbidden to in- 
vestigate. 

Boston, August 5, 1908. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Dear Fathers and Brethren: 

It is a pleasure once more to address 
you in behalf of our great cause. The 
summer is well nigh gone and we should 
be planning for the coming campaign. 
I do not remember who said: "Chris- 
tianity has sometimes lost a battle but 
has never lost a campaign." Whoever 
did say it, it is certainly true — at least 
so far as the last proposition is concern- 
ed. We ought, therefore, to always pray 
and never faint. In our time there are 
a number of great encouragements to 
faith. The wonderful progress of the 
Temperance cause is in all men's minds, 
and is a marvelous thing even for our 
marvelous age. The acts of legislatures, 
the decisions of courts, the conduct of 
great business corporations, and the 
awakening of the slumbering hosts of 
men and women are signs written on 
the sky. 

The glorious victory won by Governor 
Hughes in the Empire state over the bet- 
ting ring, which had such an unbreak- 
able grip on the state, is another fact 
which discouraged Christians should not 
fail to take into their accounts. 

The progress of the Peace movement 
at the present time is also a magnificent 
herald oi the coming day. It is a pitiful 
thing that our nation in a time of pro- 
found peace can appropriate two hun- 
dred and forty millions of money for 
army and navy, while over one hundred 
and sixty millions is set apart for pen- 
sions, but the stubborn fact remains that 
hundreds of difficulties which would 
have formerly led to war are now set- 
tled by arbitration and that scores of 
new treaties providing for it are already 

made between the most powerful nations 
of the world. 

The awakening conscience of men 
and women respecting the use of prop- 
erty is also a good cause for hope. The 



138 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



Tenth Legion of the young people's so- 
cieties has already won more glorious 
victories than did the old .Tenth Legion 
of Caesar. Worldly men and women are 
spending upon their foolish and hurtful 
desires millions upon millions, but Chris- 
tians also are in multitudes of cases glad 
to honor God with their substance and 
with the first fruits of all their increase. 
Evil men and seducers are waxing 
worse and worse, but it is also true that 
the righteous are holding on their way 
and that those who have clean hands 
are growing stronger and stronger. 

Five Preacher Elks. 

In a city where one of our meetings 
was recently being held, a newspaper in 
a defense of the lodges said that five 
of the pastors of that town were mem- 
bers of the Elks. This is one of the 
newer orders and is probably not well 
known to you. It is said to have orig- 
inated among actors and to be largely 
composed of them still. Recently I was 
holding a week's meetings in Pennsyl- 
vania and was told of the funeral of 
an Elk who' had been buried in that re- 
gion lately. He was a saloon keeper 
and over his coffin were suspended the 
words, "Let us eat and drink for to- 
morrow we die." The body was cre- 
mated and after the burning the Elks 
took -the ashes of their brother back to 
the saloon where he had carried on his 
business, placed them on the bar and 
drank to his health. 

Perhaps some of you at times think 
it hsird to say that Satan is the god of 
the lodges. Permit me to ask who you 
think moved those men to hang up that 
motto over the coffin and to drink to 
the health of the dead saloon-keeper- 
Elk? The fact is that there is no ex- 
planation of the whole secret society 
movement, if we omit Satanic control. 
The abuse of the candidates in which 



so many of them are maimed, bruised 
and killed ; the oaths to hide crime and 
protect criminals; the drunken orgies, 
the licentious dances ; the Sabbath break- 
ing excursions, and then the solemn 
march to the church where some minis- 
ter of the holy gospel encourages them 
to continue in their idolatry— all these 
point to one source. No one but that 
old Serpent, the Devil, is equal to such 
an organization as this. 

The Antichrist. 

The Bible teaches that there are two 

master spirits in tin's world, Jehovah 
and the Adversary. It teaches that these 
two battle for the empire of human 
hearts. It shows that Jesus conquers 
by testimony to the truth and by suffer- 
ing, while Satan wars with fire and 
sword. Eroin the very beginning it was 
so. Cain murdered Abel on a question 
of worship. At the end the Anti- 
christ wages war, to the extent of his 
power, against the people of God. In' 
these days, as in all days from the time 
of John till now, there are signs which 
foretoken the last great struggle, at the 
end of which Satan, and all who follow 
his dark and bloody banner, will be cast 
into the lake of fire. 

Fined for Wearing Badge. 

In a former letter I have spoken of 

the laws in restraint of free speech 
which are at this time being passed in 
various states. In the same direction 
though a little different are the laws for- 
bidding persons to wear the badge or 
emblem of an order with which they are 
not connected. From one point of view 
such legislation is reasonable, but from 
another it does not seem so clear. 

It would be said by a friend of the 
lodges that one who wears the emblem 
of an order to which he does not be- 
long, is seeking to obtain advantages to 
which he is not entitled. This may in 
some cases be true. Is it not also pos- 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



139 



siblc that the man who is a member of 
a secret order may wear his badge and 
hold his membership for the same pur- 
pose? In fact is not this usually the 
case? If members of lodges are not 
seeking undue favors why are the so- 
cieties secret? It is not easy to see why 
a man, who wishes only that to which 
he is fairly and honestly entitled, should 
wish to be a member of a lodge of any 
kind. And if lodgemen are trying to 
get undue favors in one way, and men 
who wear badges to which they have 
no right are trying to obtain unmerited 
favors in another way, why is one bet- 
ter than the other? Is it not in a way 
an infringement of personal rights for 
a legislature to tell a man what buttons 
or badges he may or may not zvear on 
his eoat? But whether it is just or not, 
the lodges are getting laws passed in 
various states forbidding men not mem- 
bers of lodges to wear their jewelry. 

Under this law a man has been ar- 
rested and fined fifty dollars for wear- 
ing a Royal Arch Mason's keystone. In 
another state a minister has been ar- 
rested for sending to a correspondent a 
letter on the outside of which was 
pasted a stamp reflecting unfavorably on 
Freemasonry. In a third state a re- 
putable business man has been threaten- 
ed with presentation to the Grand Jury 
for sending through the mails a tract 
opposing the lodge. It is interesting to 
learn that the minister, who has been 
put to inconvenience for pasting the 
stamp on the outside of the letter, swears 
that he never saw the stamp and had 
nothing to do with putting it where it 
was found. Of course it is quite pos- 
sible that some enemy first put the stamp 
there and then caused his arrest. 

These facts are significant. They 
show a stir in the lodge line. The ser- 
pent is being disturbed by the agitation 



about his hiding place. They reveal the 
fact that the movement against the lodge 
has passed from the era of indifference 
and ridicule to the era of hate and hos- 
tility. A lodgeman lately said that the 
secret orders intended to have laws to 
protect their secrets passed in all the 
states. Of course this can be accom- 
plished only by suppressing free speech 
as Slavery did so many years. And 
equally, of course, when a man has to 
ask some lodge what he is permitted to 
say or do, we have already become a 
nation of slaves. 

Our National Candidates. 

The situation being as it is, it is im- 
portant to know the theories and prac- 
tices of those who aspire to high official 
positions among us. An inspection re- 
veals the unhappy fact that we are 
fairly out of the age of men like Wash- 
ington, Lincoln, Sumner, Chase, Stanton 
and John Marshall. 

My honored Father said many years 

ago that in a popular government, in 
times of peace, power would naturally 
pass into the hands of weak men, who 
are willing to bargain and trade in or- 
der to secure place and power. 

The saddest feature of the present 

case is the position of Mr. Bryan. He 
is a professed Christian, is a man of 
large natural gifts and unbounded ambi- 
tion. Fie has twice failed of election 
and must succeed now or never. He 
seems to feel this and to be determined 
to leave no stone unturned which might 
aid him in his canvass. Among the 
forces which he is seeking to employ i:- 
the lodge power. He is a man past mid- 
dle life and has reached a period when 
men who have in their younger days 
united with secret orders usually leave 
them. Yet if newspaper reports are to 
be trusted he is almost frantic in his 
efforts to secure the support of the se- 
cret order world. 



140 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



The other candidates occupy a more 
self- respectful position. None of them 
• has, so far as we can learn, united with 
the most dangerous orders. Mr. Taft 
is almost entirely free from lodge con- 
nections. Mr. Sherman is an Elk, and 
is thus brought into the secret society 
ranks. Whether he is an active or only 
a nominal member we do not know. Mr. 
Chafin is not a Mason though he is a 
member of several lodges. Mr. Watkins 
is not a secret order man but sees no 
harm in such organizations. All these, 
candidates for official station are men of 
personal excellence, and if free to act 
out their own impulses and convictions 
would no doubt be impartial administra- 
tors of law. 

The difficulty about the case is that 
no one can tell what a lodge man wilt 
do when his lodge obligation comes into 
conflict zvith his ck'il oath. The man 
does not know himself. He wishes to 
be an honest man. He does not wish to 
break the oath he has taken to support 
the constitution and the laws. But when 
his brother lodge men ask for favors un- 
der the lodge oath what is he to do? 

Here is the heart of the whole diffi- 
culty. When a man has two oaths on 
his conscience, which may at any time 
come into conflict, he is in a very un- 
fortunate situation. No one should ever 
allow himself to be placed in such a po- 
sition. But that is exactly the place 
where every lodge man is, and no one 
but God can tell how he will act when 
the test comes. We have instances where 
officers are true to the people, and others 
where they are true to their secret or- 
ders. 

President Roosevelt is at this very 
moment in a place where his Masonic 
and his Civil oath may conflict. He is 
passing on the cases of the young hazers 
of West Point. These young men 



have been violating the regulations of 
the Military Academy where they are, 
or were, being trained at the expense 
of the Government. Their discharge 
was recommended and should have been 
ordered without a moment's hesitation. 
Instead of such action what do we see? 
A long, paltering, hesitating procedure, 
which is a notification to every coward 
in the Academy, that if he chooses to 
violate his oath and abuse his fellow 
students it is an even question whether 
he will have to suffer a real penalty or 
not. 

Still farther, while the President is de- 
ciding whether he will enforce the 
regulations or not, suppose one of his 
brother Masons, the father of one of the 
hazers, should come to him and ask 
him as a Mason to help his son; what 
would the President do? I respect the 
President very sincerely and believe him 
to be an exceptionally honest man, 
but what can he do? He has two oaths 
on his conscience which conflict. He 
must break one; the only question is, 
Which shall it be? The readers of these 
letters may remember the action of the 
head of the United States secret service 
when counterfeiters and other violators 
of law were appealing to him to free 
them; he said to the writer that he no- 
tified his lodge that he must be excused 
from his lodge oath so long as he was 
in that department of government serv- 
ice. This was quite right, but does it 
not show that no secret society man is 
fit to be an administrator of law? 
What Can We Do? 
It is hard to answer this question. 
Of course we are in duty bound to con- 
tinue bearing our testimony. In season 
and out of season we must insist that 
a man who is under special secret obli- 
gations to a part of the citizens is not 
in a position to justly exercise authority 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



141 



over all the citizens. This is so plain 
as to require no argument but is so reg- 
ularly forgotten that it requires con- 
tinual repetition. 

The constant iteration of this self- 
evident truth is bound to produce its 
legitimate impression at last. Laws 
should be just and equal, but this will be 
of no use if a secret power is permitted 
to exist, which can constantly prevent 
the honest administration of these laws. 
Whatever we may say or think about 
secret orders for other people, it is be- 
yond question that no public officer 
should be, even for an hour, connected 
with one of them. Whenever a lodge- 
man aspires to such a station he should 
at once, if an honest man, do what the 
head of the secret service did, i. e., get 
excused from his lodge obligations for 

all the term of his office. 

We also owe it to our country to pro- 
test more constantly and vigorously 
against the chartering of secret orders. 
Is it not a marvelous thing that a se- 
cret order should be permitted to ex- 
ist and to have the protection of law, 
while it is in its very nature a conspir- 
acy against all law? The nature of the 
case makes this plain and the history 
of all conspiracies confirms what would 
be the first and natural impression. 
Wendell Phillips said years ago that se- 
cret orders ought to be prohibited by 
law. Why not? When men enter a 
lodge, they at once serve notice on all 
their fellow men that they are operat- 
ing against the interests of the whole, 
and for the interests of the members. 
This alone is sufficient to make the lodge 
man an outlaw. In civil society only 
those institutions are legitimate which 
serve the interests of all. 
Fair Play for All; Special Favors for 

None. 

This is so clearly the motto of a worthy 
man that it requires no justification. 



Many years ago the writer heard Rev. J. 
M. Snyder, now with the Lord, give an 
eloquent address on this theme. He said : 
"The history of the world is red with the 
blood of those who have given life in the 
war against special privileges." How 
can we tolerate a system which is found- 
ed on nothing else but favoritism? 

We ought also to pray far more and 
better than we do. The history of the 
world, especially the history of the 
church, shows that it is not by human, 
but by divine power that evil is over- 
thrown and rightousness established in 
this earth of ours. Slavery, Infanticide, 
Polygamy, Tyranny — the great and 
monstrous iniquities of the heathen 
world, were not extirpated by the wisdom 
or goodness of men. When the clock 
struck the hour, God moved them out of 
the way that the car of humanity might 
move on. It will be so with secret so- 
cieties. We have our work to do, but 
the greater part of it is to pray the Lord 
of the harvest to thrust forth laborers 
into his harvest. 

The Greatest of These is Charity. 

There is no failing, among those who 
seek to stand as witnesses for truth, more 
common or more fatal than the lack of 
love. "The wrath of man worketh not 
the righteousness of God." Satan never 
casts out Satan. And an unkindly dispo- 
sition is an unfailing sign of his presence 
in our hearts. We cannot truly pray for 
our fellows unless we love them. We 
cannot pray for the coming of the king- 
dom of God unless we have love, tfue, 
deep and abiding, in our hearts. This 
may seem a commonplace. One may 
say, "Of course we must love, and we do. 
That is the reason we testify to unpopu- 
lar truths and seek to turn men from 
evil." It is no doubt true that there is 
much sincere love for our fellowmen 
among us. Surely we must hope that 



142 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



this is the case. At the same time, as I 
examine my own heart and seek to know 
its actual state, this is the great need I 
discover. Love is so patient, so unfail- 
ing, so abounding in hope. It is so easy 
for me to become impatient, vexed and 
despondent concerning those who do not 
readily receive the truth. 

It is my opinion that we can do nothing 
which would more advance the great 
cause we seek to serve than to pray con- 
tinually: Lord, increase our faith; Lord, 
increase our love. How does a mother 
endure the labor and pain involved in 
rearing a babe ? It is solely by the power 
of love. No other motive would be suf- 
ficient. It is love which makes the long 
night watches short and enables the 
mother, often herself frail and weak, to 
triumph in the battle with disease and 
death. 

It must be even so in the more desper- 
ate struggle we wage against the forces 
of evil in the human soul. We are in line 
with the will of God and all heavenly 
powers. We are in accord with the 
prayer our Lord taught us to pray. We 
are in the true Apostolic succession. We 
are in the gulf stream of human history. 
It is absolutely impossible that we fail if 
we strive lawfully, i. e., according to the 
rules of the war. In order to do this we 
need and must have the mind that was in 
Jesus. How thankful we should be that 
this is always within our reach and how 
determined we should be not to fail of 
this equipment for our work ! 

Brethren, pray for us. 

Fraternally yours, 

Charles A. Blanchard. 



SECEDERS' CONFERENCE. 



Rev. Fred St. Clair, of Milton, Cali- 
fornia, wrote on July 28th : "Keep up 
the fight. The Church and the Lodge 
cannot flourish in the same nation. 
Please send samples of Cynosure. 
God bless you in your brave fight for 
Christ, and Church, and native land !" 



WHY I LEFT THE ODDFELLOWS. 

Address delivered in Chicago, May 22, 1908, by- 
Rev. Samuel H. Swaktz, pastor of Methodist 
Episcopal church, Seneca, Illinois, before the An- 
nual Convention of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation. 

I really do not enjoy posing as a se- 
ceder. 1 went into the lodge just far 
enough to get my eyes opened. I was 
like the little girl's kitten. Her father 
was a Baptist and her mother a Meth- 
odist. The Baptist minister came to 
preach at the schoolhouse one Sunday, 
and the Methodists came to the same 
schoolhouse the next Sunday. The 
Baptist minister came to her father's 
house, and the Hide girl was playing 
with her kitten. He admired the kit- 
ten, and said, "I suppose that is a Meth- 
odist kitten, is it not?" She replied, 
"No, this is a Baptist kitten." In the 
course of about two weeks the Baptist 
minister came again. He inquired, 
"How is that Baptist kitten?" The lit- 
tle girl answered, "It is not a Baptist 
kitten any more." "Why not?" asked 
the preacher. "Oh/' she said, "it has 
got its eyes open." 

It did not take me long to get ni}' 
eyes open, so I did not stay very long 
in the lodge. My experience possibly is 
peculiar in some respects. I was born 
of Methodist parents, and was trained 
by a devout, consecrated, precious moth- 
er, whose memory is like a sweet smell- 
ing savor poured into my life. My 
father was a conscientious man, but a 
secret society man. I was brought up 
to think that there was nothing wrong 
in secret societies. In fact I did not 
give very much thought to the matter. 
Lodge night came, and my father went 
or not, as it suited him. That was all 
there was to it with me. I did not care 
anything about the lodge ; I was engaged 
with my books and my studies and my 
plans for the future. By and by, hav- 
ing gotten nearly through with my 
school work, I laid it aside for a while 
and took up teaching, to gather suf- 
ficient funds to go on with my studies. 
I came to New York City, to live with 
a friend of mine. He was superintend- 
ent of our Sunday-school. He was my 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



143 



treasurer — a very honest man, in whom 
I had perfect confidence. I had not 
been in his family very long before he 
said to me, "You ought to be an Odd- 
fellow. You have your way to make 
in the world ; you ought to lay your 
hands on everything that will be helpful 
to you, and the lodge will help you." 
I said, "Oh, I am not interested in it. 
I do not care about those things. I 
am busy laying the foundations of my 
life-work; busy searching after the 
things that I do not know and that I 
want to know; and I have no time to 
give to the lodge. What spare time I have 
the church and Sabbath-school work 
demands. I enjoy that and am at home 
in it, and I do not care to be bothered 
with anything else/' But my friend kept 
after me, and finally, by working on 
the innate selfishness of human nature, 
brought me to think that maybe it would 
be a good thing for me to go into that 
Oddfellows' lodge. 

I consented that my name should be 
proposed, and I was initiated. I did not 
get half through with the initiation be- 
fore I thought, "What a consummate 
ass I am making of myself !" With a 
dirty rag tied around my eyes, and a 
string around my neck, I was being led, 
like a sheep, I did not know where. And 
later, when I stood at that horrible cof- 
fin's side and looked down into that 
awful skeleton's face, I thought, "That 
does not mean anything to me;" and 
when I got through, I made up my mind 
that the whole thing was a farce. 

When I reached home, and sat down 
quietly in the library with my friend, 1 
said, "That is the biggest piece of tom- 
foolery I was ever guilty of." Really 
I felt ashamed of myself. "I am glad 
my mother did not see me to-night." 
My friend said, "You are too sensitive. 
Never mind whether you like that part 
of it or not — it is for zvhat you are going 
to get out of it that you have gone in." 
I thought, "All right; I have the pill 
down so far; I will see how much will 
stay down." So for a time I continued 
to attend the lodge, as opportunity was 
afforded me. Then I began to hesitate. 

I did not quit the lodge for con- 
science sake — I had no religious con- 



victions on the subject at all. Some- 
how or other, I had set it entirely aside 
from my religious experience and re- 
ligious faith. They did not seem to 
touch the question. This is why I left 
the lodge — / saiv too much immorality 
connected with it. I said this on the 
platform one time, down at Galesburg 
— Dr. Blanchard was with me. After 
the address an Oddfellow came to me 
and said, "What immorality did you 
ever see in the lodge-room?" There was 
no immorality in the lodge-room — oh, no, 
they are very proper there; but it is the 
character of the social aftermath that 
impresses the individual of even ordi- 
nary spiritual sense. 

Right here I want you to understand 
that I did not go into a lodge of low- 
down fellows, They called themselves 
the prize lodge of the New York juris- 
diction. The membership was made up 
of physicians, bankers, merchants, law- 
yers. There were two ministers in that 
lodge, one a Presbyterian and the other 
an Episcopalian. There was a sprink- 
ling of young fellows like myself. Stu- 
dents some of them were, and some were 
clerks, bookkeepers — young men hold- 
ing positions of trust, with every pros- 
pect of noble manhood ahead of them. 
They were the class of men that you 
would naturally be glad to associate 
with. 

I had not been in that lodge six weeks 
before a man old enough to be my fath- 
er — I was twenty-four years of age at 
the time — said to me, as he put his arm 
through mine, "We are going to have 
some supper together ; won't you go with 
us?" I looked at my watch and said, 
"No, it is getting late — well on to 
eleven o'clock ; I think it is time for a 
boy of my age to be at home and in 
bed. I shall have to be in the school- 
room to-morrow morning, at nine 
o'clock, with a clear head ; and I will 
not have a clear head if I do not get 
sleep." But no, I must go and have sup- 
per with them. I went ; but before they 
finished that supper I bade them good- 
night. I could not enter into a conver- 
sation of the kind which went on at that 
table. I was. not willing that mv mind 
should be smirched with the filth of 



144 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



that conversation. I could not take part 
in their banquets, and was ridiculed be- 
cause they thought I was not man 
enough to drink wine, or even a cocktail. 
Yet I was man enough to control my- 
self. I went home, and I knelt at my 
bedside and asked God to forgive me 
for keeping the company I had that 
night. I also said, "I thank Thee that 
my mother does not know anything 
about my company to-night." The 
thought would intrude itself, "How 
would I like my mother to be with me 
here? How would I like my sisters, 
whom I honor and love — pure women. 
Christian womeii^— to see me in this 
kind of association?"* I said to my- 
self, "I am in the wrong pew. This is 
not my kind of a crowd. I cannot trifle 
this way." There came to me an in- 
tense conviction that if I continued to 
trifle in that way. it meant spiritual 
death; and I could not afford to do it. 
That is why I came out of the Odd- 
fellows' lodge. 

The young men who were in that 
lodge — where are they to-day? I could 
name four or five of them — promising 
men, with as fair prospects in life as 1 
had, or any other young man ; intelli- 
gent, well equipped for life's service, 
splendid men physically ; everything that 
a man could ask was given them of God 
for the journey of life and the prosecu- 
tion of life's work. Where are they to- 
day? They went on step by step — some 
of them from that order into what is 
called a "higher" order, the Masonic 
order — really there is nothing higher 
about it. Two of these young men, the 
brightest of them, dangled at the end 
of a rope in the Tombs prison, in the 
State of New York, for murder — mur- 
der which they committed while under 
the influence of strong drink, which they 
learned to make use of as a part of the 



*Such testimony is not uncommon. A Knight 
Templar Mason and leading attorney of this 
State, who at one time resided at Pontiac, re- 
nounced his secret society obligations upon be- 
coming a Christian. He declared that the evil 
was not so much in the lodge itself as, in the 
associations there formed. There are in nearly 
every lodge, he said, men of shears, corrupt men, 
who take special delight in leading young initi- 
ates astray. This attorney said he had known 
many a clean young man to be led, after the close 
of the regular lodge meeting, to gambling places, 
and houses of ill-fame. — Editor. 



social equipment of the lodge. Another 
of them is eking out a horrible exist- 
ence, if he be alive now, in the State's 
prison in New York. 

I would stand on any platform and 
denounce secret societies from the stand- 
point of their moral deformity — from 
the standpoint of their impure acts — if 
for no other reason. It is a vicious 
thing to segregate men and shut them 
up by themselves in a lodge-room, bind- 
ing them by terrible oaths to inviolable 
secrecy regarding what may be said or 
done by them, and leaving them thus 
without the ordinary restraints of so- 
ciety, and without fear of exposure, to 
do whatever their lust or pleasure may 
dictate. Man is nothing but a magnifi- 
cent savage. If he ever amounts to 
anything more than that, it is because 
of the grace of our Lord and Savior 
Jesus Christ which comes into his life 
and influences and molds that life. Man 
in his human nature alone is nothing 
better than the beast, gratifying every 
ambition, whether it be high or low. 
Subject to the associations by which he 
is surrounded, he is either elevated or 
dragged down by them. 

I do not believe it is a good thing 
to segregate men where there are no 
women. If 1 were a woman, and a 
man asked me for my hand in matri- 
mony, and he was a secret society man, 
I would say, "No, sir." Not for one 
moment would I put my hand, if I were 
a woman, in the hand of a secret society 
man, though he were the Grand Master 
of the Grand Lodge of the Masonic or- 
der, or the highest mucky-muck among 
the Shriners. I would walk by the side 
of no man who held in his mind or 
heart any secret which I might not share 
in. The secret that shuts the wife out 
of the confidence of her husband, is only 
the entering wedge which the years drive 
further and further in, until he becomes 
so accustomed to lie, so accustomed to 
cover his tracks from the eye and 
thought of his wife, that the chasm be- 
tween them grows wider, and wider, and 
wider. I am convinced, from my study 
of men, from my study of the home-life 
of the world as I have come in contact 
with it — I have traveled nearly around 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



145 



the world — that secret societies cause 
more separations, more heartaches, more 
misunderstanding's in family circles, 
than any other influence or power. 

A Mason says to me, "You insinuate 
that a Mason would lie." I don't insinu- 
ate a,ny such thing. I say boldly and 
positively, that / have never met one 
who would not lie. I have said to my 
brethren in the ministry, "Do you re- 
member the other night, when your eyes 
were swathed in a dirty cloth, and you 
had a cable-tow tied around your neck, 
and your left breast uncovered, and your 
limb naked, and an old slipper on your 
foot, and you were thus led about — an 
awful spectacle? Can you recall it with- 
out a sense of degradation?" I have 
had more than a dozen ministers of the 
gospel say to me, "That is an infernal 
lie; no person was ever subjected to 
anything like that." I have come in 
close contact with godly men who have 
recognized the hidden things of dark- 
ness in the secret empire and have step- 
ped out of the lodge, and in my heart 
to heart talks with them they have told 
me again and again that these things 
are so. 

One place, where I was pastor, I call- 
ed the official board of the church into 
my study for business. I had been get- 
ting ready to go to Pittsburg to attend 
an anti-secrecy convention, and had been 
looking up some things. A good deal 
of anti-secrecy literature was lying on 
my study table — I never cover it up. A 
young man came in, one of the mem- 
bers of my official board. He was a 
physician — a fine fellow, well educated, 
a Knight of Pythias. Lying on top of 
the pile of books and pamphlets was the 
exposure of the Knight of Pythias — the 
work sold by the National Christian As- 
sociation. He picked it up and looked 
at it, turned over page after page, and 
began to grin ; then he looked at me. 
I said, "Arthur, do vou know anything 
about that?" He said, "A little." "Welt, 
my boy," I said, "is not that correct?" 
"Oh, don't ask me anything about it; 
I don't want to talk to you about that; 
I came here for the business meeting. 
What business have you with that book? 
You are not a K. P." I said "I bought 



it; I am not ashamed of it." In a few 
moments another man, of about the 
same age, came in. He did about the 
same thing that the young doctor did. 
He opened the book and turned over 
the pages. After he had looked at it a 
moment, with a curl of contempt he 
flung it on the floor. I said, "Look out; 
that is mine." He said, "Well, I would 
not own that thing; it is a confounded 
lie, from beginning to end." I started 
from my chair. I said, "Henry, will 
you tell me that publication is a lie? 
You have been through the whole busi- 
ness. . Is it a lie?" He said, "Of course 
it is a lie." I said, "Next Sunday I will 
administer the sacrament. Now don't 
you dare to present yourself for that 
holy sacrament until you have purged 
your lips and your heart of that lie; 
for if you do, you will eat and drink of 
those blessed emblems unto damnation 
to your soul." He turned on his heel 
and went out. It was too warm for him. 

I said to one party, "Charlie, how can 
you degrade yourself to go through the 
initiatory ceremony of the Masonic or- 
der? How can you gain the consent of 
your mind to go through with that de- 
grading, demoralizing initiation?" He 
looked at me, put his hands deep in his 
pockets, and said, "Look here, Sam; 
you are a crank. I want to tell you it 
is the most magnificent service you ever 
went through in ail your life. It is in- 
spiring." "Well," I said, "it doesn't 
take much to inspire some people." 

I did not get very far into Oddfellow- 
ship, but I got in far enough to find 
that I was such an odd fellow there 
that I had no place among them. They 
tried to hold me — paid my dues, by vote 
of the lodge, out of the treasury, for two 
or three years, and sent me the most 
flattering invitations to tarry with them ; 
but God had spoken so plainly to me 
that I did not dare to turn from His 
word. 

I said I had no religious convictions 
on the secret society question at the time 
I left the lodge. 1 did not get the re- 
ligious convictions until I met the hon- 
ored father of my Brother Blanchard 
some years ago. It was my privilege 
to come very close to Father Jonathan 



14G 



CHK1 STl A.N C YJNOS U KE. 



September, 1908. 



Blanchard. I thank God I knew him. 
He was a rugged old fellow. He was 
like a rock. 1 sat at his feet and drank 
in from his lips instruction along this 
line, and others, that I have thanked God 
for ever since. It was in the beginning 
of my ministry, when I was beginning 
to handle holy, sacred things. That pre- 
cious old saint put his arms around me 
as though I were his own boy, and gave 
me instruction that arnied and strength- 
ened . me against the unrighteousness 
and devilishness of the secret empire. 



_ (The following are additional testimonies, 
from the stenographic report of the proceed- 
ings, of, the Annual Convention, May 21-22, 
1906, of the National Christian Association. 
—Editor.) 



REV. E. P. KUHL. 

One order spoken of a moment ago 
by our brother is the Eagles. How 
many of you here are.on the side of Pro- 
hibition? The Order of Eagles is a 
wholesale and retail liquor dealers' or- 
ganization. Do you want to know how 
it came to be organized? You have 
heard people spoken of as the "Best Peo- 
ple On Earth" (B. P. O. E.-— Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks). The 
Elks were organized by theatrical peo- 
ple as a protective order for theatrical 
people. Newspaper men, being associat- 
ed with theatrical people, were admitted; 
then other people were admitted into the 
order, and it spread until it became very 
popular. In most Elk lodge-rooms to- 
day you will find a sideboard for 
liquor ; and those who desire have a pri- 
vate compartment m the sideboard that 
is stored with their personal liquors, and 
upon the sideboard are glasses and the 
things necessary tor the fixing up and 
mixing of the drinks. How do I know? 
Because I have drunk there. There is 
nothing like seeing. You know there is 
a great deal of that Missouri character- 
istic in me, "show me." Well, I have 
been shown. When I tell these things 
about the Elks, I know what I am talk- 
ing about. 

Now that was the Elks. The saloon 
men finally flocked to the Elks and it 
became a. great saloon order. There 



came a time in the life of the Elks when 
they began to see this would hardly do, 
and they got nasty nice. They put out 
the saloon men, but kept the bar in their 
lodge-rooms. I do not say. that all the 
lodges have the sideboard, but I say a 
large number of ihem do. A brother- 
in-law of mine, who is a member of that 
order — I was talking with him along that 
line. "Why," he said, "I have seen one 
of our pastors here in town, who is 
a member, put his face to a bottle of 
beer and never let go until the bottle 
was empty." The pastor was there in 
the town where my brother-in-law lived, 
and was a member of the Elks. 

The saloon men went out and organ- 
ized the Eagles. While there is a great 
deal that is evil coming out of the other 
orders, let me tell you that the most 
dangerous order to-day is the one that 
you have just heard spoken of, the 
Eagles ;. because the wholesale and re- 
tail whisky interests are behind the 
Eagles. This lodge was organized to 
take in the saloon men who had been 
thrown out of the Elks. 

Did you ever attend a social session 
of the Eagles? I have, and at that ses- 
sion I saw the lieutenant-governor of a 
State, two ex-governors of a State, and 
the majority of the members of the leg- 
islature of that State (it was in the State 
capital), all there drinking beer in that 
social session; and some of them got so 
drunk before the session was over that 
they took them home in carriages. I 
was there. If a man should go through 
a threshing machine, and lived to come 
out at the other end, he would know 
something about what it was to go 
through a threshing machine, would he 
not? He would know something about 
it if he lived to come out. Well, figur- 
atively speaking, I went through the 
threshing machine ; and it was only by 
the grace of God that I got out alive. 

I was a member of several secret so- 
cieties. I do not know anything about 
Masonry, but if Dr. Blanchard's expos- 
ure of the Masonic degrees last night 
was as true as his exposure of the 
Knights of Pythias, I can vouch for the 
truth. 

I want to ask you one thing. Can you 



September, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



147 



show me a man who has been down in 
the gutter, down and out, carried down 
by the demon of rum, that any order 
has reached their hand down and lifted 
him up and placed his feet on the Rock, 
Christ Jesus? Can you show me one? 
1 would like to see that man, if you can. 

But I want to tell you of only one" 
instance of numerous instance^.. Far 
away in the Southwest, in the city of 
.San Antonio, Texas, a few years ago, 
there was a man known as "Old Drunk- 
en Gassoway." He was a drunkard, 
down and out, hanging around the sa- 
loons, back in the alley when the empty 
keg was thrown out, that he might drain 
the dregs. One night, led by the Holy 
Spirit, Old Drunken Gassoway stagger- 
ed into a Salvation Army hall and drop- 
ped down into a seat, so drunk he could 
hardly walk. The meeting progressed, 
and there came the time when the in- 
vitation was given, "Is there a soul here 
that wants to know the way of eternal 
life?" Old Drunken Gassoway got out 
of the seat and staggered forward and 
dropped upon his knees. The boys in 
the back part of the room began to tee- 
hee, to think that Old Drunken Gasso- 
way, as drunk as he was, was going up 
there to get religion. The captain who 
told me these things, said that when he 
knelt by that old man he smelled of 
whisky so strong that he could hardly 
kneel by him; he thought he must have 
some whisky spilled upon him. He 
said, "I confess my faith was not equal 
to it, yet I prayed with him." Finally 
he stood up on the platform, reeling 
there, and said he was going to live for 
Christ. The boys laughed again, and he 
said, "Boys, (hie) you may laugh, (hie) 
but I mean it." On the next night the 
man was there. He had by some means 
become smooth-shaven ; he had gotten 
him a needle and thread and sewed up 
the rents that were in his clothing; he 
had gotten hold of a whisk-broom and 
brushed them the best he could. He was 
sober. He had not touched a drop of 
liquor since the night before, and was 
trembling like an aspen leaf because of 
the absence erf the liquor that had nerved 
him through all those days. He was 
there with his mind clear and he gave 



a bright testimony. That great and glo- 
rious organization that we see on our 
street-corners put their arms around 
that man, Drunken Gassoway, and the 
last I heard of him was a few years 
ago when I picked up a paper, while in 
the Southland, and T saw a report of the 
conversion of the son of the governor 
of one of the northwestern States, who 
was converted from drunkenness at the 
drum-head, as the paper said, under the 
preaching of the noted Texas evangelist, 
Captain Gassoway. 

Can you show me a man that any 
lodge has ever raised up to such a posi- 
tion as that? Not one. 

A. W. HUNTER. 

I have been associated with two 
lodges. One of them was strictly a 
farmers' organization, known as the Pa- 
trons of Husbandry, and the other was a 
fraternal organization known as the 
Mystic Workers of the World. The 
Mystic Workers I joined purely for the 
insurance feature. I attended while I 
was in the vicinity of the town where 
the lodges were located, in this State, 
but moved later to Iowa, into a neigh- 
borhood where there was no lodge of 
either kind. I did not join any other 
lodge, and so, for the time we lived 
there — six years — I was not actively con- 
nected with any, although I held my in- 
surance in this Mystic Workers' lodge. 
It was a new organization, having been 
organized something less than two years. 

Well, nearly four years ago I met the 
Lord Jesus Christ, and salvation came 
to our house. I did not have any use 
for the lodges after that. We dedicated 
all that we had to the Lord — which was 
not very much in the way of worldly 
goods — and the lodge question was laid 
on the altar. The Lord never convict- 
ed me about dropping my insurance, al- 
though I told Him time and time again 
that any time He said so I would drop 
it. I reasoned it out this way, that it 
was not wrong to give money, and the 
money we paid in was going to help 
benefit some other poor person who was 
in the lodge. So it went on. Along 
about the first of January, this year, the 
Lord called us off the farm, and I have 



148, 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



been attending the Moody Institute 
since; preparing for Christian work — I 
don't know just what it is, but He does. 
About that time I had an impression 
that the Lord wanted me to give up that 
insurance ; yet it was not definite — I was 
not sure about it. I believe the Lord 
knows that I was honest. I kept pray- 
ing about it, and my wife and I prayed 
about it, and. here on the 6th day of 
May, after some correspondence, I 
wrote a . letter severing my connection 
with the lodge on the insurance line. 

I want to say, friends, that I believe 
the Lord is able to take care of every 
one of his children. I have never known 
one of his promises to fail yet. I told 
my wife this morning — we were here in 
the services yesterday afternoon — I said, 
how glad I was, as we enjoyed that 
service, that we had minded the Holy 
Spirit and given up that insurance. 

There is one thing that I want to 
say about this farmer organization that 
I belonged to, that has not been said 
about some of these others; and that is 
that they did teach and recognize the 
true God. I do not know much about 
any of the other organizations, only just 
incidentally, but I know this about this 
farm organization, that they do recog- 
nize the true God, and there were some 
true Christians — good, earnest Chris- 
tions — in the organization. Yet I realize 
that while, as I look at it, they were 
doing good in a sense, morally, they were 
not doing all the good they should do 
for God. 

The only time I have been in a lodge- 
iroom since we were saved, was when, 
visiting the old home, I was there as 
a visitor, and the Lord helped me to give 
a good, ringing testimony for Jesus 
Christ. One of the things I told them 
was that I came to a place where I rec- 
ognized I was a sinner on the road to 
hell, and that Jesus Christ came to seek 
and to save the lost, and I had surren- 
dered my life to Him. Well, the pre- 
siding officer of the lodge, a real, good 
friend of mine, one who had been a close 
neighbor and quite friendly when we liv- 
ed there, in a sort of apology said he 
didn't think that I had been as bad as 
I thought I had. I got up again and 



told them it was just as strong as that, 
and I said, "I was on the road to hell," 
and I told them if they were not with 
Jesus they were on the same road. The 
Lord blessed me in bearing this testi- 
mony. Although there have not been 
definite results, we are still praying for 
that lodge in that neighborhood. 

May God bless us all and keep us true. 
I praise God for this conference, and I 
know it is being blessed of God. 



ROBERT CUNNINGHAM. 

I can never thank God enough for 
opening my eyes to the evils of secret 
societies. I was an Oddfellow for nine- 
teen years, and I had the name of taking 
in more young men into our lodge than 
any young man in the order. The lodge- 
room was above my store building; I 
had access to a great many young men, 
and I was very successful in getting 
them into the Order; but listen, would 
to God I had exercised that energy in 
getting them to Christ instead of to the 
lodge. This thought often comes 
through my mind. I cannot thank God 
enough for showing me the evils of the 
lodge, and for the privilege of raising 
my voice against it. 



An Eastern pastor writes of President 
Blanchard's address, published in the last 
Cynosure : 

"The address fits the portrait, and the 
portrait the address. To review it in de- 
tail would take time ; but it is fine, and I 
am delighted to know that the annual 
convention had such an address, and 
again to know of its circulation in the 
Cynosure. It would be a great thing 
to produce one such address and article 
in a lifetime. Yet he is doing a vast 
work besides/' 



Mr. Thomas P. Hitchcock, a farmer, 
in writing to his brother, J. M. Hitch- 
cock, one of our Directors, says: "j 
want to go to Temperance, to see if I 
can get the church next Sunday, in 
which to read President Blanchard's 
address at the N. C. A. Convention, as 
published in the August Cynosure, 
That address is one of the grandest 
things I have ever read." 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



140 



This is an excellent suggestion, and 
it is to be hoped that many may arrange 
to circulate and multiply that very in- 
forming and inspiring address. 



Hero* of ©ur Pori 



STATE CONVENTIONS. 

Read the appeal in this number from 
Secretary Merrill of the Michigan Chris- 
tian Association. Remember the date of 
the Convention — October 7th and 8th. 
It will be held in Grand Rapids. Among 
the speakers secured are Pres. C. A. 
Blanehard, Rev. J. W. Brink, Rev. G. 
A. Pegram, Rev. IMr. Emerick, and Rev. 
PI. D. F. Gaffin. The Congregational, 
Christian Reformed, Methodist Episco- 
pal, Free Methodist, and Wesleyan 
Methodist churches will be represented 
in this Conference, and doubtless others. 
Appoint delegates at your next church 
prayer-meeting ; pay their expenses ; and 
when they return, require them not only 
to report the Convention, but to give the 
church a plan for more aggressive work 
on this line. 



Secretary Stoddard writes that he ex- 
pects the New York-New Jersey Con- 
vention will be held the last of October, 
in Passaic, N. J. Time will permit full 
notice in the October Cynosure. An in- 
vitation has been received from Rev. 
A. J. Van den Heuvel, pastor Christian 
Reformed Church, Passaic, N. J., offer- 
ing their church for Monday and Tues- 
day, October 19th and 20th. 



The President of the Iowa Associa- 
tion spent the month of August in the 
East, but on his way there Rev. J. S. 
McGaw stopped in Chicago for consul- 
tation as to time and place of his State 
Convention. He has been ably seconded 
by his State officers, the Treasurer, Mr. 
A. Branson, especially, being very active 
and helpful. He has secured the audi- 
torium of the Holiness University of 
Oskaloosa for the Convention, which is 
to meet October 5th and 6th. President 
Blanehard has agreed to attend and give 
one address. Iowa has abundance of 



material, and a good Convention, as 
usual, may be considered assured. . Let- 
ters and contributions may be addressed 
to President J. S. McGaw, Morning Sun, 
Iowa, R. F. D. 

Are the friends of the Cause in Indi- 
ana supporting their President's efforts 
as they should? How many have writ- 
ten him, giving him encouragement by 
word, if not by contribution? Fie is do- 
ing the very best that he can, and will 
doubtless be able to announce definitely, 
in. the October number, the time and 
place for the Indiana State Convention. 
Write him ! 



OUR ALLIES. 

BY J. M. HITCHCOCK. 

Something like forty years ago the 
National Christian Association espoused 
the cause of Antisecrecy, for better or 
worse. It sought neither riches nor 
fame, and has found neither. It expect- 
ed to be maligned and its motives im- 
pugned, and . has not been disappointed. 

There was then, as there is now, much 
latent, undiscovered, ineffective antise- 
cret sentiment in our midst. It was the 
purpose of this Association to utilize 
these forces through better organization 
and a better equipment. 

At the breaking out of our Civil War, 
nearly half a century since, it was often 
difficult to distinguish between friend 
and foe. Issues had to be studied and 
lines of demarcation more definitely 
drawn. If the National Christian As- 
sociation has had a worthy mission, war- 
ranting its continuance, it has been in 
exposing to the light of noonday the 
baleful influences and the iniquities of 
those societies whose §tock consists 
mostly in concealments. The Associa- 
tion has aimed to be the servant and 
hand-maiden of the churches — an ar- 
senal for supplying the munitions of war- 
fare for their defense. By its large 
collection of exposes, sermons, lectures 
and other literature the Association has 
rendered a valuable service to truth, 
which would have been next to impossi- 
ble for the churches to do in their in- 
dividual capacity. 

The position of the Association has 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



been in the van of battle, baring its 
breast to the shot and shrapnel of the 
enemy and encouraging the churches to 
follow. Something like twenty-five dif- 
ferent denominations to-day stand as a 
solid phalanx against the encroachments 
of the secret enemy. A consistent brav- 
ery seven days and nights in a week is 
an indispensable quality in this warfare. 
Men who fearlessly confront the boom- 
ing cannon's mouth are sometimes too 
cowardly to refuse an invitation to draw 
their "liquid rations" from the quarter- 
master. Some churches set up a most 
valiant opposition to all secret organiza- 
tions until approached by some indus- 
trial union — often the most demanding, 
dictatorial and tyrannical of any of the 
secret orders, and here they become ter- 
rified and surrender. Such are com- 
paratively few. 

The Association congratulates itself 
upon the strength and unflinching brav- 
ery of its many allies, among which may 
be mentioned the Christian Reformed 
denomination. These people have never 
been known to falter. The Rev. Dr. 
Einink and Rev. E. Breen, of this de- 
nomination, are honored members of 
our Board of Directors. In the month 
of June these people held an ecclesiasti- 
cal convention in Muskegon, Michigan. 
They required no instruction upon the 
subject of Secret Societies. They are 
a Bible loving and a God honor- 
ing people. The readers of the 
Cynosure have learned that I 
am not a lecturer — simply an occa- 
sional writer for these columns. As a 
fraternal delegate I visited the Muske- 
gon convention on June 23d, bearing 
the kindly greetings of our Association 
and receiving jn return the most hearty 
assurances of the convention's apprecia- 
tion of our services to the churches. 



Professor Elliott Whipple, of Wheaton 
College, writes : "An unexpected in- 
crease of income enables me to increase 
contributions to good causes, so I enclose 
another $5.00 for the work of the Na- 
tional Christian Association, in whose 
welfare I continue to take a deep inter- 
est." 



THE LODGE, ONE GREAT COUNTER- 
FEIT. 

BY REV. JOHN W. BRINK, PRESIDENT 
MICHIGAN CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

There is a multiplicity of lodges, but 
the Lodge is one. The Lodge is an or- 
ganism, an organic body. The members 
of this body are the different lodges. In 
this organism one local lodge occupies 
a more important place than others, 
even as with the members in our body. 

One can view this unity from various 
points of vantage. Study the Lodge 
well, thoroughly recognize its principle, 
know well its end and aim, weigh the 
means adopted to the end, examine the 
fruit produced by it, test the spirit pre- 
vailing among the members in and out 
of the lodge meeting, then post yourself 
on religion, the Bible, the church and 
her offices, if not already conversant 
with- these and kindred matters, and 
then compare the former with the latter 
carefully, soberly. The result will be 
that you will adjudge the former to be 
the counterfeit of the latter. And as 
the latter are God's handiwork, it fol- 
lows necessarily that the former is the 
counterfeit product of Satan, from hell. 
Counterfeit of the Church. 

The Lodge is the devil's counterfeit 
of God's glorious establishment, the 
Church of Christ. Satan's endeavor is 
to supplant the church. Many a lodge 
member evidences that the old serpent is 
but too successful in his endeavor, for 
again and again will they tell you, that 
the church is a back number, long since 
played out, and no good. And if you 
stoutly deny the assertion and prove 
vour contention, then the man turns on 
his heel, saying: "I do not need the 
church. My lodge is my church. And 
it's a mighty good one,- too." 

The religion of the Lodge is the re- 
ligion of Satan. In Paradise the arch 
fiend first preached his religion when he 
told Eve that black lie about God and 
the results of disobedience. The very 
essence of that religion was selfishness. 
The Lodge to-day has that same re- 
ligion. The only object of worship the 
Lodge knows is self. Every member 
of the lodge is on principle a priest to 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



151 



himself. All his sacrifices are for the 
advancement of self. 

Counterfeit Prayers. 

Its prayers are counterfeits. The true 
essence of prayer is communion with 
God in Jesus Christ, a communion ex- 
ercised on the basis of our wants, which 
are of various sorts. The lodge pray- 
ers, as a rule, ignore Christ, know noth- 
ing of his atoning blood and interces- 
sion at the right hand of God. The 
Lodge effort is as worthless as a coun- 
terfeit coin, and extremely wicked in 
the sight of Jehovah. For he who pre- 
sumes to draw nigh unto God other than 
in Christ, will meet: with destruction. 
And nominally, although not in reality, 
the lodge member approaches God in his 
lodge prayer. Such utterances are a 
stench in the nostrils of our God, and 
are elements in the worship of the devil, 
and accepted by him as such. 

Counterfeit Virtues. 

The virtues of the secret organiza- 
tions are not genuine. They speak of 
purity, benevolence, patience and the 
like. But the lodge virtue lacks the 
right motive, faith in Christ; their ob- 
ject is not God's honor, but everything 
rather than that; and they are not hold- 
en to the rule of God's expressed will. 
Moreover, the exercise of the virtues is 
in many cases limited to the fellow- 
member, his wife, daughter and sister. 
Promises a Counterfeit Heaven. 

The Lodge is one great fraud, a 
product of the devil's hellish ingenuity 
in counterfeiting the work of the 
Almighty as the Redeemer of the world. 
As God assures us of salvation upon the 
atoning, expiatory satisfaction of Christ 
Jesus, so the devil promises salvation 
and heaven to the worthy lodge mem- 
ber. And many will tell it with assur- 
ance, that they are sure of heaven. 
While the burial ritual of every lodge, 
be it small and insignificant, or large 
and imposing, reads the departed brother 
into heaven, variously known as Happy 
Hunting Ground, The Great Tent 
Above, etc. 

The Michigan State Convention. 

The fight against the lodge has been 
on some years. The work of Satan is 
being exposed. This fight must never 



diminish, but rather increase. No truce: 
The expose must be ever more thorough 
and fearless. One very efficient means 
to the end that the lodge may be suc- 
cessfully combatted is the real live con- 
vention, right in the enemy's country. 
Such a convention may not draw a great 
many lodge members, but it will 
strengthen the fighters and will find the 
seceder and bring him out to testify 
against one of the greatest and most de- 
structive evils of our times. 

The officers of the Michigan State 
Association are endeavoring to hold a 
convention in the city of Grand Rapids, 
Mich., the second week in October. The 
program will be found elsewhere in this 
issue. Most heartily do we exhort our 
Michigan members and friends of anti- 
secrecy to make plans to attend in per- 
son, both days. Or if they cannot, to 
send a letter. And to contribute to 'the 
expenses. Come all and help put the 
standard just a little more forward. 
And let me not forget to urge all to 
pray for the National and State organi- 
zation and for this convention. 

Muskegon, Mich. 



IOWA STATE CONVENTION. 
Programme. 

The Iowa Christian Association will 
hold its Annual Meeting in the audito- 
rium of the Central Holiness University, 
Oskaloosa, October 4th to 6th, 1908. The 
programme will be as follows: Sunday 
evening, 7 130 o'clock, Address by Rev. 
Dr. C. A. Blanchard, President, Wheaton 
College. Monday morning, prayer and 
praise led by Rev. J. W. Ludy of Oska- 
loosa. Address of Welcome by B...W. 
Ayres, Acting President of the Central 
Holiness University. Response by Presi- 
dent, Rev. J. S. McGaw. Appointment 
of committees. Monday afternoon, 
prayer-meeting for the National and 
State work, conducted by Rev. William 
"P. Sopher, Address by Rev. J. A. Gerrit- 
sen of Leighton. Monday evening, 7 130 
o'clock, Address by Rev. Dr. C. A. 
Blanchard. Tuesday forenoon, prayer 
and praise meeting, led by Rev. Lurana 
Terrell of Oskaloosa. Open Parliament 
led by Rev. E. Howard Brown of New 
Sharon. Address by Rev. John Nelson 



152 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



of Des Moines. Question Box. Ques- 
tions to be answered by Rev. J. S. Mc- 
Gaw. Tuesday afternoon, Address and 
report by Rev. H. P. Gray of Auburn. 
Address by William I. Phillips, Chicago. 
Open Parliament led by Rev. H. P. Gray. 
Tuesday evening, 7 130 o'clock, Address 
by Rev. J. S. McGaw of Morning Sun. 
Address by Rev. S. Van der Werp of 
Pella. Music furnished during Conven- 
u" •- -ine university. (This programme 
is subject to change.) 

T. J. Adrian, Secretary. 



MICHIGAN STATE CONVENTION. 

Holland, Mich., Aug. 14, 1908. 

To the Brethren iii Christ Jesus every- 
where, and especially to those who live in 
Michigan, greeting. 

Dear Brethren — We are nearing the 
time for the Annual Convention of the 
Michigan Christian Association. This 
has, in some respects, been the best year 
in many years for our work. And the 
convention to be held in a few weeks is 
to.be the best convention we can possibly 
make it. 

We believe the "Lodge'' to be a system 
of iniquity that every Christian man and 
woman should be arrayed against. There 
are enough churches in Michigan, which 
are opposed to this evil, so that should 
every' one send a delegate we would have 
a ' convention that would number hun- 
dreds and make a deep impression on the 
city where we meet. 

Now, my dear friends, will you not 
take it upon yourselves to see that your 
cluirc'h elects and sends a delegate to this 
gathering, which is to be held at Grand 
Rapids, Mich., October 7 and 8, in the 
Lagrave Street Christian Reformed 
Church? ' 

Let us rally against this foe that 
strikes at the vitals of our holy Christ- 
ianity. 

Yours for Jesus, 

A. R. Merrill, 
Secretary M. C. A. 



AGENT PEGRAM'S REPORT. 

Dear Cynosure — On Sunday morning, 
July 19, I preached at the Wesley ah. 
church. At this service one soul was 
happily saved. On Monday night, I 



spoke at the same church on "Lodge 
Oaths and Principles." 

The lodge folks were very mad, but 
were afraid to say or do much. Most 
lodge folks, both men and women, 
church members or non-church members, 
will get as mad as hornets, when anyone 
exposes the pure meaness and clevilish- 
ness of lodgery. The spirit which they 
show is the spirit of the very old devil 
himself. If they want to convince the 
world that their institution is Christian, 
let them act Christlike. 

Then I went to Bay City and distribut- 
ed some tracts, sold books, and looked 
after the interests of the Cynosure. 

Then I went to Eaton Rapids Holiness 
camp meeting, and distributed several 
hundred tracts, and talked personally 
and to several groups. The effect was 
shown in several ways. The lodge pins 
were nearly all gradually dropped off. 
Quite a number of testimonies on lodg- 
ery, and more questions on secrecy in the 
question drawer than ever before, so they 
said. 

My next stopping place was Goodrich 
F. M. camp meeting. Here I preached 
once, and spoke once on Secrecy. At the 
former service one sought and found the 
Lord. Two more subscribers to the 
Cynosure list. I also sold several books, 
and distributed numerous tracts. 

After this I preached twice at Belle 
Oak M. E. camp meeting and also spoke 
once on the Lodge. One was saved at 
the first service, and two at the last. 
More literature was left here to encour- 
age and strengthen the faithful and loyal. 

August 15 I preached on "Separation 
from the World," at Hastings W. M. 
camp meeting. It was well received and 
quite a number wanted to hear more on 
the lodge question. 

I can very easily see that interest in 
anti-secrecy is growing here in Michigan, 
but opposition to the work is growing 
strong in some places. 

Yours for righteousness, 

G. A. Pegram, 



The Christian's life should be an illus- 
tration and an application of his profes- 
sion. 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



153 



SECRETARY STODDARD'S LETTER. 

Lehmasters, Pa., Aug. 18, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure: The meetings at 
Ephrata, Pa., were better than I expect- 
ed. I spoke three times to large audi- 
ences. It was reported that there was much 
discussion regarding what had been said. 
Evidently "the leaven" was at work. 
Ephrata has many lodges. Such a stir- 
ing up would attract much attention. 
That there may be much fruit to God's 
glory is my prayer. A good collection, 
together with many subscriptions to the 
Cynosure, was the support of our 
friends. 

On a visit to Weaverland, Spring 
Grove, and Terre Hill, Pa., I made the 
acquaintance of friends, who desire 
lectures. A friend at Spring Grove 
promised to furnish the church, while an- 
other promised to furnish the congrega- 
tion, at such time as I could furnish the 
lecture. There is more need for our 
work in this section than some realize. 
The lodge snare is set and will surely en- 
trap innocent souls unless they are in- 
formed. Some will be foolish, but some 
can be saved, if the truth is presented. 

If God gives strength it is my inten- 
tion to answer calls for lectures in this 
section next winter. Let any wishing 
help arrange for the place and let me 
know the opportunity. 

For about one week I "fished" in 
towns north of Philadelphia. The kind- 
ness of many friends made the work 
pleasant. On August 26th I addressed a 
large congregation in the Worcester 
church of our Schwenkfelder friends. I 
have spoken to these friends on many 
subjects, in other years. I felt that an 
anti-lodge message was due at this time. 
The powers that be, decided that I might 
give such a message, though some had 
doubts as to its wisdom. Several thank- 
ed me for the message, saying" it was 
what they needed. If any earnest Christ- 
ian was offended I did not learn of it. 

A full week of my time was given to 
home duties and rest. It seems I am 
often compelled " to neglect my family, 
while looking after the families of oth- 
ers. This is not as it ought to be. When 
the lodge people get right this will not 
be necessary. 



For eight days I have been the guest 
of Radical United Brethren friends at 
Kauffman, Pa. This has given splendid 
opportunity to preach, lecture, get ac- 
quainted, distribute tracts, secure Cyno- 
sure subscriptions, and drink spring 
water. The camp meeting of this year is 
regarded as . a great success. Many 
sought and found Christ in the pardon of 
sin; a larger number were aided by the 
instruction and spiritual atmosphere. 
While there # were some incidents calcu- 
lated to try, I shall carry a pleasant mem- 
ory of my stay at this gathering. I very 
much regret that space does not allow 
mention of the many parts of this spirit- 
ual feast. Rev. J. A. Burkholder, Elder, 
Rev. O. G. Alwood, Bishop, and Rev. 
John M. Warden, Evangelist, were lead- 
ers ; we of the ordinary served as called 
upon. Your agent presented, for over 
an hour, "The Church in Contrast to 
the Lodge." 

J. K. Lenherr, of Mercersburg, Pa., is 
among those who have stood by me 
through many years. He told of my in- 
tended visit, and the pastor of the M. E. 
church at that place invited me to address 
his prayer-meeting. 

A ten-mile ride by stage over the 
mountains brought me to the only county 
seat in Pennsylvania that has no railroad 
or trolley. Fulton county has its share 
of the mountains, but some nice people 
and good crops in the valley. A few 
Cynosures were planted in McConnells- 
burg and acquaintances of other years 
renewed. The lodge has too many repre- 
sentatives in McConnellsburg. I met at 
the hotel an attorney, who said: If em- 
ployed by one, who told him he had com- 
mitted murder, he would defend him. A 
Knights Templar emblem was prominent- 
ly displayed. I d ; .d not wonder when 
told the church in which he is a prom- 
inent member has long been without a 
pastor. His inquiry, if I was still lectur- 
ing, showed my address of eleven years 
ago was remembered. 

There was an opportunity awaiting at 
Green Castle, Pa., for Sabbath addresses. 
The Radical U. B.'s in this place are not 
so many* but their number is increasing. 
It was announced that several were to 
be baptized next Saturday. At the close 



154 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



of my anti-lodge address a collection 
was taken. One man, in shaking hands, 
said he was a lodge man, but "you are 
right!" Look for that man to come out 
of the lodge ! 

Yesterday I looked up our work at 
State Line, Pa. Most of the folks want- 
ed money more than they wanted the 
Cynosure, but the Radical pastor, with 
others, helped along. I am now at the 
home of Rev. Tenney, Radical U. B. 
pastor here. lie tells me he* had told the 
people that the big preacher from Wash- 
ington is to speak to-night, but had not 
given my subject for fear some might be 
frightened. To-morrow I go (D. V.) to 
the Cleona, Pa., Camp Meeting". Rev. C. 
F. Kreider, our former State Secretary, is 
in;charge there. He writes that my visit 
will be welcome. I h may be that next 
week I shall slip over to Northfield, 
Mass., to visit loved ones, and say a word 
in defence of the right. Cod bless the 
N. C. A. and all its faithful workers. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



FROM AGENT DAVIDSON. 

Dear Cynosure — I am still holding the 
fort in the name of our God, and lifting 
up His banner. 

At Evanston, III. 
. By invitation of the Rev. B. P. E. 
Gayles I conducted a ten days' series of 
meetings here at the Second Baptist 
Church. Rev. Gayles is the eldest son of 
Dr. G. W. Gayles, of Greenville, Miss. 
He is a graduate of Roger Williams 
University, Nashville. Rev. Gayles has 
been a Mason and Odd Fellow, but is 
now free from the clutches of the beast. 
He has his people under very good dis- 
cipline, although a large number of his 
members are connected with lodges. I 
had a very good meeting here, and the 
people seemed to have enjoyed my ser- 
vices, but they contributed very shabbily ; 
they raised very little above my railroad 
fare. I secured a number of subscribers 
for the Cynosure. It will be an eye-, 
opener to them. 

At Chicago. 

I enjoyed two very pleasant visits to 
the general office of the National Christ- 
ian Association, where I received a cor-, 
dial welcome from General Secretary 
Wm. I. : Phillips, and the veteran 'Dr. 



Hitchcock. I was not able to secure an 
appointment to speak in Chicago. 
At Bloomington. 

Here I received the usual cordial wel- 
come from Dr. J. T. Brown and his good 
people, and preached twice for them, and 
conducted one Bible reading. My ser- 
vices were well attended and much in- 
terest manifested. I secured a few sub- 
scribers. The Cynosure is doing a silent 
but effective work here and opening the 
eyes of many. I go from here to 
Metropolis, Mounds, Mound City, 111., 
and Lexington, Ky., where I hope to 
attend the National Baptist Convention. 
Pray that God may give victory over sin 
through His word. 

Yours in His name, 

Francis J. Davidson. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., July 29, 1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips : — I got the tracts 
you sent me. We had a great quarterly 
meeting here in Pine Bluff, the 24th, 25th 
and 26th of this month. The ministers 
all preached against the lodge sin. They 
preached the word and I gave out the 
tracts. These tracts are opening the peo- 
ple's eyes. They are beginning to see 
their mistake. While handing out the 
tracts I got into a conversation with a 
K. P. brother. He said, "Was you up 
the river a few Sundays ago?" I said, 
"Yes." He said, "Well, you are the wo- 
man that is fighting the lodges." I an- 
swered, "Brother, I am fighting all sin." 
He said, "Yes, but you had one of our 
rituals up there, showing it to all the peo- 
ple. One of our brothers was there, and 
he met the lodge and told us about it. He 
said something must be done about it." 
I said, "What is he going to do ?" The 
man said, "Nothing. What can we do? 
The secret is out." He'said, "I told them 
they had better let you alone, before some 
of them got into trouble." He said that 
when he said that some of them wanted 
to jump on him. He told them, "Yes, 
she has our books, and any other kind of 
lodge book you want." Then they said, 
"Well, we will get some good Christian 
among us to go to her and talk kind to 
her and try to get our book away from; 
her. The book is ours by law. "We can 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



155 



demand our property anywhere we see 
it."* I said, "I wonder why that man 
did not seize the ritual." He took it in 
his hands and looked at it, and said to 
me, "Yes, this is our work." "He looked 
at the diagram of the lodge-room, and 
said to me, "This is my station right 
here," and he laughed and said, "Where 
did you get this book?" I showed him 
the cover of the book, where it read, "For 
sale by the National Christian Associa- 
tion, 221 West Madison street, Chicago." 
He said, "Well, well," and walked off, 
and came right on to Pine Bluff and re- 
ported me to the lodge. 

This man that I was talking to said, "I 
told them all in the lodge-room that any- 
thing that could not stand an investiga- 
tion ought to be broken up." He said 
he told them, "I belong to this lodge, but 
the Bible says it is not right ; and I am 
going with God's Word." Brother Phil- 
lips, I looked at the man while he was 
talking, and I thought of Saint Paul — 
how he stood up for Jesus with chains on 
his hands ; and I said within myself, "He 
is a poor prisoner ; he has got the devil's 
chains on him ; and yet he is brave 
enough to stand up right in the temple 
of the goddess Diana." (See Acts 19: 
24 and 35.) I said, "Old Pharaoh will 
have to let God's people go. Praise God 
for that !" 

Well, the preachers of all the different 
denominations are leaving" the secret so- 
cieties. The lodgemen say — I mean a 
few that have not got common sense — 
that they are going to have lodge 
churches. I said, "Yes, when the North 
and the South divided on account of slav- 
ery, the side that was wrong' went under. 
So will you when you go to yourselves 
so }'OU can prostitute women and protect 
murderers for a little money. You will 
go down. God is not dead yet. The 
Lord is on our side. Your wall is daubed 
with untempered mortar." (See Ezekiel 
13:10-16.) 

A man said the other day, "If you want 
to ruin, anything, let a woman get into it." 
(He is a Mason and is mad about his 
lodge. I used to trade, with him in my 



husband's lifetime, but now he does not 
want to speak to me, though I speak to 
him and talk with him.) He says, 
"When a woman gets into anything she 
has not got sense enough to be afraid — ■ 
for instance, Carry Nation and others. 
So the thing will have to go. Our secrets 
are all exposed." 

A grand lodge met here last week. On 
Wednesday night they had preaching at 
Saint John's Methodist Church. On Fri- 
day night they danced at the Masonic 
hall till three o'clock in the morning. 
The Masonic temple here has three sa- 
loons on the first floor, contains a club- 
room and a church meeting-place, and 
in the fourth story a dancing hall ! What 
do you think of that? 

The Grand Master in the session here 
said in his annual report that it was his 
painful duty to tell the deputies of their 
local lodges not to take in any more fifty 
and fifty-five-year-old men and women in 
this lodge — no more old, blind, crippled, 
no account people for us to take care of. 
I said, "Well, Lord, these are the kind 
of people You said to take care of." Is 
this charity? Is this the love that, in the 
lodges, they have for the poor? And 
they call this thing charity ! Away with 
such a humbug! 

They had two kinds of badges — one 
for $1.50 and another for fifty cents. 
Every member had to buy one or pay a 
fine. They sold about $3,000 worth of 
badges. They had $4,000 clear of ex- 
penses. Think of men serving the dollar 
and losing their souls ! 



♦Compare Act? of Tennessee Leqislaturo; print- 
ed in April,.: 1908, 'CYNOSURE., page 359; "'See 
also- comment tHereon in. Jniy, 1908, CYNOSURE, 
page 8C— Editor. 'C- > ' - ••■'■ ""^ r^;?" 



August 8, 1908. 
I have just got in from Fairfield, Ark., 
a little station south of Pine Bluff. I 
met the Saint Marion Women's Associa- 
tion — a great crowd of Christian women 
who are studying their Bibles. I was 
introduced to the association and had a 
chance to make them acquainted with 'the 
N. C. A. T tried to make them see the 
sin of secret societies. I told them just 
to think of it— a person can get sick and 
no one will visit him unless he belongs td 
some order! I said, the Lord made n$ 
and told us to keep His commandments* 
He told -us to visit the sick; arid if We 
don't visit the sick because' of whaV-He 



150 



CHRISTIAN CYNOlStJRK. 



September, 1908. 



said about it, but put? His commands aside 
and go to some Worthy Matron and let 
her make us over (i. e., initiate us in the 
lodge) after God made us and told us 
what to do, we will have to hear at the 
last day the word recorded in the 25th 
chapter of Matthew, verses 41-46. The 
sisters did not get mad — only a few. I 
told them, We have left the first love 
(Revelation 2:4-5}'.' 

One of the big preachers, who belongs 
to four secret societies, said he had been 
leading" the people for thirty years and 
had never led anyone wrong. After we 
.went outdoors, a sister came up to me, as 
I was giving" out tracts, and said, "God 
bless you. Tell the truth. If these 
preachers won't tell it, we will have it 
anyway." They laughed at the preacher 
for. saying he. had led them right for 
thirty years, and yet he had been teaching 
men to swear. They said, "We know 
that. Jesus is right; we know He is the 
great Shepherd of the sheep; and He 
said (Matthew 5:33-37), not to swear. 
Now whom must we believe — Jesus or 
this preacher?'' I said, "Read Romans 
.3:4: 'Let God be true, but every man a 
liar.' That settled the matter. 

I stayed over night with the W r orthy 
Matron of the Eastern Star lodge. Her 
husband was the Most Worshipful Mas- 
ter of the Masonic lodge. They treated 
me very nicely. The Worthy Matron, 
my hostess, said tome, "Must I quit now, 
or must I ask the Lord to help me to give 
it up?" I said, "I have given you God's 
Word: now you ask yourself the ques- 
tion, whether we ought to obey." (See 
Acts-75 129— "We ought to obey God 
.rather ! than men.") She asked me to 
jpray for her, and I asked God, at the 
breakfast table, to wipe whisky and secret 
societies Out of this country and give 
righteous leaders, from the President 
down to the policeman. 

Brother Phillips, the people know their 
ritual from one side to : the other, and all 
their fry-laws of men, but nine out of ten 
don't know one thing about the Bible. I 
thank God for the Bible, and for the 
great women, like Miss J. P. Moore, who 
has given her life to God to teach us the 
Bible, that we might- know what the 
Master would have us do; and we are 



thankful for the great N. C. A., that has 
opened our eyes on the secret societies. 
Well, it is God working through His 
servants. All glory to God in the high- 
est, Whose dominion is from everlasting 



to everlasting! 



Yours for Christ, 

(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



A WESLEY AN WORD 
On the N. C. A. Convention in Ohio. 

We need more of these conventions; 
they would serve, as an inspiration and 
wonderfully help us in the fight against 
one of the greatest evils that afflict and 
curse mankind, and which are a great 
hindrance to the progress of the spirit- 
ual life in the church. It encourages one 
to know that there are others who are 
making it their business, by God's help 
and grace, to overcome this hydraheaded 
monster of iniquity. May the work go 
on, gaining impetus in its progress until 
it shall sweep over this evil, wiping it 
from the face of the earth. 
— C. PI Whetnall in the Wesley an Meth- 
odist, July 15, 1908. 



GENERAL OFFICERS 

National Christian Association, 

221 W. Madison St., Chicago. 

President — Charles A. Blanchard. 

Vice-President — John Groen. 

Ex-Officio Vice-Presidents — L. G. 
Bears, of Indiana ; J. S. McGaw, of 
Iowa ; J. W. Brink, of Michigan ; F. M. 
Foster, of New York; W. J. Sanderson, 
of Ohio; A. D. Zahniser, of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Nora E. 
Kellogg. 

General Secretary and Treasurer — 
William T. Phillips. 

Board of Directors — Charles A. Blan- 
chard, B. II. Einink, E. Breen, B. E. 
Bergesen, J. M.. Hitchcock, Robert 
Clarke, George Windle, E. B. Stewart, 
Ezra A. Cook, William B. Rose, Samuel 
II. Swartz. 

Auditors- — J. T. Logan, Joseph P. 
Shaw, H. F. Kletzing. 



MICHIGAN STATE OFFICERS, 

President — Rev. J. W. Brink, 155 S, 
Terrace street, Muskegon. 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



157 



Vice President — Rev. H. G. Patterson, 
R. F. D. 5, Birmingham. 

Secretary — Rev. A. R. Merrill, 64 W. 
Ninth street, Holland. 

Treasurer — Rev. H. Voorhess, 724 
Oak street, Flint. 



INDIANA STATE OFFICERS, 
1907=1908. 

President — Rev. L. G. Bears, 412 W. 
13th street, Pern. 

Vice Presidents — Rev. C. A. Mum- 
mart, Huntington ; Rev. L. H. Ebey, ; 
and Rev. D. Y. Schultz, Bible Training 
School, Fort Wayne. 

Secretary — Rev. H. C. Ingersoll, 13 18 
E. Creighton avenue, Fort Wayne. 



NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY STATE 
OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. F. M. Foster, 345 W. 
29th St., New York City. 

First Vice President — Rev. D. Vander 
Plbeg, 47 Hope Ave., Passaic, N. J. 

Second Vice President — Rev. K. F. 
Ohlson, 140 East 50th St., New York 
City.* 

Third Vice President — Rev. H. Blews, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Secretary — Rev. G. Westenberg, 129 
4th Ave., Paterson, N. J. 

Treasurer — Rev. James Parker, 341 
Webster Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 



IOWA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. J. S. McGaw, Morn- 
ing Sun, R. F. D. 

First Vice-President — Rev. H. P. 
Gray, Auburn. 

Second Vice-President — Rev. V. S. 
Jensen, Bray ton, R. F. D. 1. 

Secretary — Rev. T. J. Adrian, 723 
Penn. Ave., Des Moines. 

Treasurer — Abner Branson, New 
Sharon. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATE OFFICERS. 

President — Rev. A. D. Zahnizer, of 
Blairsville. 

If First Vice President — I. N. H. 
Beahm^ of Elizabethtown College. 

Second Vice President — Rev. J. S. 
Martin, of New Castle. 

Secretary — Rev. O. G. Schoenlein, of 
Castle Shannon. 

Treasurer — H. C. Cassel, 2305 Ger- 
mantown avenue, Philadelphia. 



OHIO STATE OFFICERS 

President— Rev. W. J. Sanderson, Ce- 
darville, CX 

First Vice-President — Rev. S. P. 
Long, 49 W. Park av., Mansfield, O. 

Second Vice-President — Elder I. J. 
Rosenberger, Covington, O. 

Secretary — Rev. M. S. Steiner, Colum- 
bus Grove, O. 

Treasurer — Noah Schumacher, Pan- 
dora, Ohio. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHLU 

SETTS. 

In the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and 

Eight. 

An Act Relative to the Fraudulent Use of 

Names, Titles or Common Designations 

of Fraternities, Societies and Unions. 

Be it enacted by the Senate, and House 
of Representatives in General Court as- 
sembled, and by the authority of the 
same, as follows: 

Section i. Whoever, wilfully by 
color or aid of any false token or writ- 
ing, or other false pretense or false state- 
ment, verbal or written, or without au- 
thority of the grand or supreme govern- 
ing lodge, council, union or other gov- 
erning body hereinafter mentioned, ob- 
tains the signature of any person to any 
written application, or obtains any 
money or property for any alleged or 
pretended degree, or for any alleged or 
pretended membership in any fraternity, 
association, society, order, organization 
or union having a grand or supreme 
governing lodge, council, union or other 
governing body in this state, or in any 
subordinate lodge or body thereof, shall 
be punished by imprisonment for not 
more than one year or by a fine of not 
more than five hundred dollars, or by 
both such fine and imprisonment. 

Section 2. Whoever, in a news- 
paper or other publication, or in any 
written or printed letter, notice, matter 
or device, without authority of the 
grand or supreme governing lodge, 
council, union or other governing body 
hereinafter mentioned, fraudulently 
uses or aids in any way in the use of 
the name, title or common designation 
of any fraternity, association, society, 



158 



CHRISTi&tt CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



order, organization or union which has 
a grand or supreme governing lodge, 
council, union or other governing body, 
having priority in such use in this state, 
or any name, title or designation so 
nearly resembling the same as to be cal- 
culated or likely to deceive ; and who- 
ever, without such authority fraudu- 
lently publishes, sells, circulates or dis- 
tributes any written or printed letter, 
notice, matter or device, in any way so- 
liciting members for such fraternity, as- 
sociation, society, order, organization or 
union, or for any alleged or pretended 
fraternity, association, society, order, 
organization or union, using any such 
name, title, designation, or near resem- 
blance thereof; and whoever, therein or 
thereby in any way without such au- 
thority fraudulently offers to sell, con- 
fer, communicate or give informa- 
tioi: where, of whom or by 
what means any degree or work, 
in whole or in part, of such fraternity, 
association, society, order, organization 
or union, or of any alleged or pretend- 
ed fraternity, association, society, order, 
organization or union using any such 
name, title or designation or near re- 
semblance thereof, can or may be ob- 
tained, conferred or communicated, shall 
be punished by imprisonment for not 
more than one year or by a fine of not 
more than five hundred dollars or by 
both such fine and imprisonment. 



NEW MASONIC LAW TESTED. 

Charles W. Writer was arrested at 
Fitchburg, Mass., July 30, and a date 
was set for his trial under the Massa- 
chusetts law of March 25, 1908, entitled : 
"An act to prevent the fraudulent use of 
names, titles, or common designations of 
fraternities, societies, and unions." 

The warrant charged him with fraud- 
ulent use of the name of a fraternal so- 
ciety, and the specific allegation of the 
Massachusetts Grand Lodge was, that 
Mr. Writer had solicited names for a 
society known as the Egyptian Free 
Masons, and had' formed a lodge known 
as Garnet Lodge. 

Of -course, this is a case of the Com- 
monwealth vs. C. W. Writer, as' the 
charge is •criminal ; and "' the warrant- 



served by a patrolman, named the Fitch- 
burg chief of police as complainant. 

Mr. Writer came to Fitchburg April 
Fools' Day, in search of them, and was 
arrested July 30. During the interim, 
he appears to have been doing Masonic 
business at the rate of ten dollars 
a customer. This was probably too 
heavy a mark-down for the Masonic 
market, to say nothing of being rival 
business. The Grand Lodge appears to 
have decided that the cut-rate was ille- 
gal, or the rate-cutter was an outlaw in 
the Masonic sense, for he was also a 
Blue Lodge brother. Police in other 
places had been notified, but this is be- 
lieved to be the first case of police action 
under the new law. 

Writer said that he would carry his 
c;ise to the Supreme Court for a ruling. 
He claimed to have been a Mason under 
the State lodge 33 years, but told the 
police that his order was not affiliated 
with the State lodge. By this admission 
he appears to have confessed contraven- 
ing the letter of the new law, yet he 
appeared to believe that the law itself 
might not stand as law. He intended to 
secure, if possible, John Gallagher, Esq., 
of Boston, to defend him, obtaining thus 
a regular Mason and the attorney of 
the Egyptian Rite. 

We have an impression that some 
years ago there was a not altogether 
dissimilar jealousy between the Scottish 
and York rites themselves, but that mat- 
ter had to be settled, so far as we know, 
hy Masonry, and without recourse to 
civil law. Now, however, the Massa- 
chusetts legislature has erected a monop- 
oly. It has arranged means of de- 
stroying a rival business, or at least of 
embarrassing it. 

If the Egyptian rite were new, intro- 
duced since the enactment of the law, 
the case might seem to have better color ; 
but, in point of fact, it is one of three 
long-established; parallel, and coexistent 
rites that the other two seek to get ad- 
vantage of through the deterrent effect 
of a penalty such as would befit a rather 
serious crime. The matter would per- 
haps be worse, if it were not* the case 
of two humbugs trying to expldde an- 
other, or two nuisances abatirig a third! 



September, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



139 



Yet, after all, such a law ought to be 
tested by the light of the Massachusetts 
constitution and of court precedent. 
\\ as it not a chief justice of the same 
commonwealth, who said: "A law that 
is not just, is not a law." 



THE MASSACHUSETTS LAW. 
Half a Loaf. 

Half a loaf is proverbially better than 
no bread, and every crumb of comfort 
should be accepted. Yet it could have 
been wished that recent action of the 
Massachusetts legislature had dealt more 
completely with secret orders. This it 
would have done, if it had acted upon 
the opinion of one of the most eminent 
statesmen who have brought glory to 
that state and the nation. Daniel Web- 
ster wrote concerning Freemasonry, 
what might be often read while Mas- 
onry remains unchanged and unreform- 
ed, saying, in part: 

"It is an institution which in my 
judgment is essentially wrong in the 
principle of its formation; from its very 
nature it is liable to great abuses ; among 
the obligations which are found to be 
imposed upon its members, there are 
such as are entirely incompatible with 
the duty of good citizens. . . . It is 
my opinion that the future administra- 
tion of all such oaths, and the formation 
of all such obligations, should be pro- 
hibited by law." 

Though this was written in 1835, m " 
asmuch as Freemasonrv retains its 
character and forms, it applied as well, 
when, late in 1907, a bill prompted by 
similar convictions was introduced at 
the Massachusetts state-house. At that 
same place, and in the same year with 
Mr. Webster's writing, the legislature 
made this a leading subject of discus- 
sion. Searching official investigations 
in New York and New England brought 
forth legal exposure of the principles 
and practices of the order. Nine-tenths 
of the membership of lodges in the 
Northern states ceased to be Masons. 
The grand lodge in Massachusetts sur- 
rendered its charter. Public indignation 
was at white heat, and the common- 
wealth . shared its great statesman's 
opinion. 



The more recent legislation has fail- 
ed to act fully on the renewed question, 
yet it has passed a law designed to cut 
off part of the evil done by the secret 
system. It has included with Freemas- 
onry, Roman Catholic societies guided 
by the Jesuit order, together with others 
of various purposes and innumerable 
names. 

The law is entitled: "An act relative 
to the fraudulent use of names, titles, or 
common designations of fraternities, so- 
cieties, and unions." 

The two interpretative words from 
this heading are the key to the meaning 
of the law. They are : ''Fraudulent," 
and "Names." 

Priority of use by a grand lodge in 
the state, is held to give exclusive sig- 
nificance to a name. A name deceptive- 
ly similar, is ruled to be identical. 

Section 1 forbids obtaining a signa- 
ture to an application for membership, 
or accepting money or property for al- 
leged membership, in case it is done de- 
ceitfully or without grand lodge author- 
ity. 

Section 2 forbids using written or 
printed matter, in any way involving 
fraudulent or unauthorized employment 
of a society name ; explicitly, it prohib- 
its soliciting members by such means , 
and, finally, it forbids using them to of- 
fer initiation, or tell where or by 
what means it may be obtained. 
Throughout, this law is "an act relative 
to the fraudulent use of names." Of 
course, that clause of the Massachusetts 
state constitution which protects freedom 
of the press does not protect fraud, 
a fraudulent act not being an exercise 
of freedom within the legal meaning of 
that term. It is easy for lodges called 
Clandestine to evade such a law, which 
is incomplete, not only through not cov- 
ering all kinds of cases, but, besides, by 
failing 1 to cover contingencies which it 
does not notice. A statute covering the 
whole secret-society fraud would have 
been better, but if that part called clan- 
destine can be limited, perhaps some- 



thing desirable is done. 









There are more flowers on the by 
paths than on the open highways. 



160 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



September, 1908. 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING T ODGES 

FOR SALE BY 

The National Christian Association 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of ^-ICy Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchard, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
the truthfulness of this work and show the 
character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
— several of them full-page — give a pictorial re- 
presentation of the lodge-room and principal cere- 
monies of the degree, with the dress of candi- 
dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
work and lectures of the Mark Master, Past 
Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
degrees, as set forth by General Grand Royal 
Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
pletely illustrated with diagrams, figures and illus- 
trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
conducting the business of the Lodge. The 
"secret work" is given in full, including the oaths, 
obligations, signs, grips and passwords. All of 
^hich are correct and can be relied upon. The ac- 
curacy of this work has been attested by high and 
unimpeachable Masonic authority. Cloth, $1.25; 
paper cover, 60 cents. 



OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP I L L U S - 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each 
degree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual 
corresponds exactly with the "Charge Books" fur- 
nished by the Sovpreiern Grand Lodge. Cloth, 
$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIx 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
75 cents; paper cover, 35 cents. 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
UAL. 

Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
ficiary and Fraternal degrees (illustrated), with 
"unwritten" or secret work, installation, funeral 
ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
Order of Red Men, comprising the Adoption De- 
gree, Hunter'b Degree, Warrior's Degree, Chiefs 
Degree; with the odes, etc. Cloth, 75 centos 
paper, 35 cents. 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
of the Council and Commandery, comprising the 
degrees of Royal Master, Select Master, Super- 
excellent Master, Knight of the Red Cross, Knight 
Templar and Knight of Malta. A hook of 341 
pages, in cloth, $1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
lege, who also furnishes the introduction and analy- 
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hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
Masonic authorities (three hundred and ninety- 
nine of them foot-notes) show the character and 
object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
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work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
Lodge, and the signs, grips, passwords, etc., all 
of which are accurately illustrated with 85 en- 
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quoted verbatim, and can be relied upon as cor- 
rect. Contains the "unwritten" work. New 
Revised Edition, enlarged to 275 pages ; flexible 
cloth, $1.00. 

MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
larged edition, 40 cents. 

ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
three Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to i?ead the cypher. Pocket size, 
full roan, flap, $2.50. 

FINNEY* ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
50 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
bondage, the candidate takes hundreds of horrible 
oaths. 15 cents. 

ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 

INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
of such oaths and the consequent duty of all 
who have taken them to openly repudiate them. 
5 cents. 

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages ; 5 cents. 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman, showing 
Masonic assault on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech ; interference with justice in 
courts, etc. 20 cents. 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS. 

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I. O. O. F.," with the "unwritten" (secret) work 
added and the official "Ceremonies of Insti- 
tuting Rebekah Lodges, and Installation of Officers 
of Rebekah Lodges." 35 cents. 



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CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

Historical Sketch ; How the Business is Man- 
aged ; Publications ; Its Work and Its Workers ; 
Co-operating Organizations ; What Is Accom- 
plished. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
package of 25 for 25 cents. 

EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
cents a copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

By Col. George R. Clarke. A Thirty-two De- 
gree Mason, an officer of the Civil War, founder 
of "Pacific Garden Mission," Chicago, and a Chris- 
tian Worker of national reputation. 11 pages; 
postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 25 
for 25 cents. 

GRACIOUSLY DELIVERED 

ITrom Seven Secret Societies. By Rev. E. G. 
Wellesley- Wesley. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a 
copy. A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

Rev. M. L. Haney, a minister and evangelist 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a seced- 
ing Mason, tells his experience and states his 
objections to the Lodge. A Christian Lodge Im- 
possible. Is the Lodge a Help or a Hindrance 
to Salvation ? 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. 
A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

BAPTIf T TESTIMONIES. 

Fro: i Rev. P. S. Henson, D. D., Rev. A. J*. 
Gordon, D. D., Rev. Nathaniel Colver, D. D., and 
others. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A 
package of 25 for 25 cents. 

ETHICS OF MARRIAGE AND HOME LIFE. 

Secret Societies in Relation to the Home. 
By Rev. A. C. Dixon, D. D., pastor of Chicago 
Avenue (Moody) Church, Chicago. 3 pages ; post- 
paid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 
25 cents. 

CHURCH AND LODGE. 

An Address Delivered at Mr. Moody's "Con- 
ference for Christian Workers," at Northfield, 
Mass., by President Charles A. Blanchard, D. D. 
15 pages ; postpaid, 9, cents a copy. A pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. - 

PERSONAL WORK: HOW TO SAVE CHRIS- 
TIANS FROM LODGES. 

By Charles A. Blanchard, D. D., President 
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paid, 2 cents a copy. 

LODGE RELIGION. 

The Fundamental Doctrine, the "Universal 
Fatherhood of God," Discussed and Refuted. 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A package 
Of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
OFFERED TO SATAN. 

Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
nual Convention of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, May 15, 1902. 

The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
The Greatest Masons are Our Teachers. Is Free- 
masonry a Religion? Is the Masonic Religion Chris- 
tian? What Kind of Religion is It? Marks of 
Demon Worship. Cur Duty. 24 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy, or $1.00 per hundred. 



ODDFELLOWSHIP A RELIGIOUS INSTI- 
TUTION 

And Rival of the Christian Church. 8 pages ; 
postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a package of 25 for 
25 cents. 

WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

By Mrs. Elizabeth M. Rull. 6 pages ; post- 
paid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 25 for 25 
cents. 

CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

What is Oddf ellowship ? Ought Christians, to 
Perform Acts of Beneficence and Charity as Odd- 
fellows? Rebekah Lodge. By Rev. H. H. Hin- 
man. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy; a pack- 
age of 25 for 25 cents. 

WHY. DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

By Rev. J. Blanchard. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents ; a package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE "GOOD MAN " ARGUMENT. 

God's Word or the Ofher Man's Conscience — 
Which Should We Follow? 4 pages; postpaid, 3 
copies for 2 cents. A package of 75 for 25 cents. 

THE STRANGE CASE OF MR. GOODMAN. 

"Why Are There So Many Good Men in 
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pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package of 
25 for 25 cents. 

ARE INSURANCE LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

The Modern Woodmen of America an illustra- 
tion. 4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2c. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

OUGHT CHRISTIANS TO HOLD MEMBER- 
SHIP IN MODERN WOODMEN OF 
AMERICA? 

Extracts from History and Official Ritual 
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4 pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

LODGE BURIAL SERVICES. 

Should a Christian Participate in Them? 4 
pages ; postpaid, 3 copies for 2 cents. A 
package of 75 for 25 cents. 

MASONIC OBLIGATIONS. 

Blue Lodge Oaths (Illinois Work) ; Masonic 
Penalties ; Are Masonic Penalties Ever Enforced ? 
Masonic Arrogance ; Masonic Despotism ; Grand 
Lodge Powers ; Disloyalty to Country ; Our Re- 
sponsibility as Christians; What Can Be Done? 
16 pages; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. A package 
of 25 for 25 cents. 

FOES OF THE CHRISTIAN SABBATH. 

A word on the common desecration of the 
Sabbath. Secret societies prominent in its pro- 
fanation. 8 pages ; postpaid, 2 cents a copy. 
A package of 25 for 25 cents. 

A package containing one of each 
of the above tracts will be sent, 
postpaid, for 25 cents. 

NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

221 W. Madison Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 





Sweet Syhosure 

far Fixed 

In Spotless Fields, 

High In The Regms 

•<^>OF THE «*"■ 

Polar Might, 

Thou Serv'st 
A WAYMARK 

To The Sons 
Of Time, 





CHICAGO. OCTOBER. 1908. 



BACKBONE 

BY JOEL SWARTZ, D. 

Ah, yes; Mr. Dunn, I am sure everyone 

Applauds your brave boy with a bend in his back ; 
But is it well known that a rigid backbone 

Is something a youngster may lack? 
A tall, tapering tower; a sky-scraping wall; 

A hill-crowning oak or a pillar of stone, 
If bent in their lines are in danger to fall, 

As boys are in danger without a backbone. 

In times of temptation, the boy that will bend 

An ear to the Tempter and list to his tone, 
Is not as secure in his progress and end 

As one who is braced with a rigid backbone. 
'Twere better, far better, to stand all alone. 

Thau join in the revel and go with the band; 
To strain every nerve and to brace every bone 

And like a true soldier for openness stand. 

Ah, yes; let him bend with politeness and grace 

Where honor with courage and manliness vies, 
And let him bend low in the heaven-born race 

To reach the high calling and capture (he prize; 
But, O, when suggestions to "Frat'Msm assail 

And woo from the path where his Innocence (rod. 
Then let his young manhood, his conscience prevail 

And hold him erect as a soldier of God! 

— Xcir Yuri: Obscrra: 

Webster Groves, Mo. 



•Appreciating Rev. B. B. Dunn's "The Boy with a Hcnd 
in His Back." [Adapted for Christian Cynosure. -Bd.] 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE — Per year, in advance, $ 1 .00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at Chicag-o, IJ1., under Act of M^rch 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Position of The Moody Bible Institute 

of Chicago 161 

State Conventions *161 

New England Christian Association An- 
nual Meeting 161 

Bates College's Non-secret Literary So- 
cieties 162 

Not Frogs — Incorporation Refused New 

Association 162 

"Murder Will Out" — Suit to Recover 

Spanking Machine 162 

The Rustin Family— A Pathetic Story... 162 

President Blanchard's Letter 163 

Christ, our Nation's King. By Rev. J. M. 

Foster, Boston . 167 

Obituary — David H. Harrington 169 

Knights of the Golden Eagle 169 

Formation of the Whig Party 170 

Samuel D. Greene and the Morgan Mur- 
der 170 

Hoo-Hoos in Concatenation .171 

If Sensitive, Then Vulnerable 172 

Through a Tunnel 173 

Rome Sapping and Mining America 173 

A Problem in Subtraction — What If Free- 
masonry Were Wanting? 174 

A Civic Revival 175 

Antima sonry Founded on the Bible 175 

Adopted by a Congregational Association . 176 
Testimony of Elder David Bernard on 

Freemasonry *177 

News of Our Work 178 

From Louisiana Agent 178 

Michigan Agent's Report 178 

From W. B. Stoddard .179 

The Call for the New York-New Jersey 

Convention 181 

Resolutions on Moral Reform Passed by 
the United Brethren in Christ 181 



Agent Davidson's Report 181 

From New England's Secretary .'. 182 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter .183 

Contributions for the N. C. A. Received 

Since May 1, 1908 184 

A Cluster of Carleton Epigrams ........ .185 

From Our Mail 185 

From Evangelist Wolfe .186 

Spanking Cure for "Frat" Evil ... . . .186 

Strenuous Initiation ... 187 

Frats Grilled by Educator 187 

Why Not Colleges? .188 

West Point Hazers . .,. , ... . . . .189 

Publicity or Secrecy . V. 190 

Lodge Murders 190 

Lodge Uses Dynamite 190 

Lodge Destroys Wheat 190 

Victim of Black Hand 190 

Lodge Slugging 191 

Our Imperative Needs 191 

Effect of Secret Society Training *191 

SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

"A SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES" 

By Rev. S. P. Long, A. M., Pastor of First 
English Lutheran Church, Mansfield, Ohio. A 
very convincing article against secret societies 
argued from a Scriptural standpoint. 27 pages, 
8vo., paper cover, 7c, per doz. 60c. 

"DIE RELIGION DEB GEHEIMEN GE- 

SELLSCHAFTEN" 

By Prof. Gottfried . Fritsehel, D. D., of the 
Wartburg Theological Seminary. 76 pages, 
paper cover, 25c, per doz. $2.40. 

"WAS HAT DIE XIRCHE MIT DER LOGE 

ZU THUN?" 

By Rev. Prof. George Fritschel of Wartburg 
Theological Seminary, Dubuque, la. 44 pages, 
paper cover, 10c, per doz. $1.00. 

"THESEN NEBER DIE GEHEIMEN GE- 
SELLSCHAFTEN." 

By Prof. Gottfried Fritschel, D. D. Paper 5c. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
sniping Freemasons in the Christian Church. 10 
cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work ings of 
Freemasonry," by Ex-President Charles G. Finney, 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 , 
cents : paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; aud in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, OCTOBER, 1908. 



NUMBER 6 



POSITION OF THE MOODY BIBLE 
INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO. 

An honored evangelist is reported as 
publicly commending the k>4ge and dis- 
paraging ministers who have criticised 
him for so doing. He is a true Chris- 
tian and would lose a member of his 
body before he would willingly dishonor 
Christ or put the slightest stumbling 
block in the way of His weakest follow- 
er. For this reason we courteously sug- 
gest that he devote a part of his next 
vacation to a careful study of the lodge 
system from the Bible point of view. 
Some good men are in the lodge, but it 
is capable of proof that the system is 
anti-Christian, and that in practice it is 
a parasite on the church. As an insur- 
ance society, a benevolent association or 
a social club it may have its place, but 
as a substitute for the religion of Jesus 
Christ, which it often becomes, it is a 
dangerous and subtle foe. There are 
localities in this country where it has 
acted on the spiritual life like the gipsy 
moth on the fruit trees. 
— The Institute Tic. July> 1907. 



The Iowa State Convention will be in 
session about the time this number reach- 
es our subscribers. The place is Oska- 
loosa, and the time October 4th, 5th, and 
6th. Much credit is due the State Treas- 
urer, Mr. A. Branson, for the preparation 
which has been made. 



The Michigan State Convention, fol- 
lowing on the heels of the Iowa Confer- 
ence, meets in Grand Rapids, in the La- 
grave Street Christian Reformed church, 
on October 7th and 8th. 



The call for the New York-New Jersey 
Convention is found in this number of 
the Cynosure. It pays to sacrifice to be 
present at these gatherings, but any who 
cannot be there ought to write as encour- 
agingly as possible, that their views may 
be heard in the gathering by written 
word, if not by word of mouth. 



President Bears, of the Indiana State 
Association, still hopes to have a Con- 
vention in November, but he is undecided 
as to a place for holding it. We give his 
address herewith, believing that there 
must be those who realize- the blessing 
which such a Conference brings to a place 
and will urge its being held in their city. 
Write to President L. G. Bears, 412 West 
13th street, Peru, Indiana. 

NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION. 

When God Calls, Loyal Hearts Respond, 

"Here Am I, Lord." 

The Annual Business Meeting of the 
New England Christian Association, (D. 
V.) will be held Wednesday, October 
7th, 1908, in the parlors of the Associa- 
tion Building, No. 560 Columbus avenue, 
Boston, at 2 130 p. m., as provided in the 
Association By-Laws. Reports, of retir- 
ing officers will be given, showing re- 
ceipts and disbursements during the year, 
the number of tracts printed and distrib- 
uted, and a compendium of the work 
done. The selection of officers for the 
ensuing year, and plans for a vigorous 
campaign, are items of the programme 
which call for the earnest prayer, and 
where practicable the presence and coun- 
sels of every friend of the cause of which 
God has made us His stewards. ^ 

There will be an evening session in the 
First Reformed Presbyterian church with 
three addresses of t\7 nty minutes each. 
The speakers are: Re .'. A. K. Mac Len- 



162 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



nan, Boston ; Rev. N. W. Deveneau, 
Worcester, Mass.; and Rev. J. M. John- 
ston, Clarinda, Iowa. 

Let prayer unceasing ascend for the 
marked and manifest presence and power 
of the Holy Ghost in this annual gather- 



ing. 



James H. Earle, . President. 
Anna E. Stoddard, Rec. Secy. 

BATES COLLEGE. 

President G. C. Chase, of Bates Col- 
lege, Lewiston, Me., reports 438 students 
for the year 1907- 1908. Our readers 
will be especially pleased with what the 
Catalogue, recently issued, says of the 
Literary Societies. 

"The Bates Literary Societies have al- 
ways been among the most unique and 
characteristic features of the College. 
They harmonize thoroughly with its aims 
and have been found to be democratic, in- 
expensive, and quickening to the intellect. 
Unquestionably they have powerfully 
contributed to vigor and efficiency in de- 
bate. Experience shows that they need 
to be somewhat guarded on the social 
side, lest their true object be forgotten. 
To the fact that Bates has open literary 
societies, rather than the Greek letter 
fraternities, is, in large measure, to be 
attributed her freedom from caste, from 
snobbishness, and, I may add, from dis- 
sipating and extravagant customs." 



NOT FROGS. 

An association of actors sought incor- 
poration, which was refused by a court 
officer in New York. The fowls of the 
air had already been represented by the 
Eagles, the beasts of the field by the 
Elks, and now these seemed to seek a 
plunge into the water as Frogs. It has 
been charged that this court officer is 
"evidently not familiar with the writings 
of Aristophanes." He may not be a great 
reader of literature twenty-three cen- 
turies old, yet he seems at least to rival 
ancient sages in wisdom, for he will not 
allow men to incorporate themselves as 
frogs. 



"MURDER WILL OUT." 
Suit to Recover One Spanking Machine. 

L Special to the Indianapolis News.] 

Marion, Ind., September 14. — John 
W. Talbott, supreme president, and 
George D. Beroth, supreme secretary, of 
the Home Nest of the Order of Owls, at 
South Bend, Ind., have been at variance 
with the 'members of the Marion Nest 
ever since the latter withdrew from the 
original order last June and united with 
the American Order of Owls. 

The troubles culminated Saturday 
when the supreme officers filed suit 
against the fifty-one charter members of 
the Marion Nest of Owls, demanding 
$170 damages and the conversion of per- 
sonal property, which the Home Nest 
asserts was only lent to the Marion Nest. 
Among the articles demanded are one 
spanking machine, two rope ladders, two 
black gowns, two masks, four pairs of 
boxing gloves, a can of mercurine, iron 
kettle and ladle and other equipment. 



Never tell evil of a man, if you do not 
know it for certainty, and if you know it 
for a certainty, then ask yourself, "Why 
should I tell it?" — Lavater. 



THE RUSTIN FAMILY. 

We borrow the following pathetic par- 
agraph from a paper published in the 
East, but it should touch sympathetic 
hearts anywhere. 

''The Rustin family, of which Dr. 
Frederick Rustin met a violent death in 
Omaha recently by shooting, is one into 
which troubles do not come singly. Eight 
years ago the father, Captain Rustin, 
died from pneumonia in Alaska, whither 
he went in search of a fortune ; a son, 
Wilkin Rustin, met death in college while 
being initiated into a college society ; and 
another son, Henry Rustin, an electrical 
engineer, became a victim of consump- 
tion. 'There seems almost nothing left 
for me,' said the heartbroken mother. 
'Three distinguished careers in one fam- 
ily, cut short by death in so short a time, 
are almost too much to -bear. All my 
boys were good, and the last tragedy in 
the family is too horrible to talk about.' 
There are many who can sympathize with 
this afflicted woman in the feeling that 
'all Thy waves and billows are gone over 
me.' " 



If we would make our lives happy, let 
the love of God abide within us. 



October, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1G3 



€ontrilmtt0tt0. 



PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 



Dear Fathers and Brethren : 

It is quite possible that some of you 
have thought me too harsh when I said 
that secret orders are a discipline for 
murder. If any of you have felt thus, I 
commend to your careful attention the 
following narrative, which differs from 
thousands of others only in that it has 
become more fully known. 

A dairyman in Chicago, for reasons 
satisfactory to himself, left the Milk 
Drivers' union, with which he had been 
connected. About a month since, this 
man was shot early one morning, as he 
was preparing for his deliveries. Three 
men came to him in the semi-darkness 
and offered to help him "hitch up." He 
accepted the proffered assistance, and 
while they were all busily engaged one 
of the three struck him, knocking him to 
the ground, and as he was rising another 
of them shot him. 

His wife tells the pitiful story of her 
husband's persecution and attempted 
murder, as follows : 

"They have hounded us until we have 
had no rest for months," said Mrs. Spey- 
er, "and now they have shot my husband 
because he did what he thought was 
right. He has not known a minute's 
peace since he left the union, and they 
have nagged and persecuted him until he 
dreaded that he would be shot or beaten 
every time he went out on the street. I 
made him carry a revolver finally, but he 
was without it when they attacked him 
in such a cowardly manner. I feel that 
Sumner and Turner, officials of the un- 
ion, are behind the attack on my hus- 
band, for it was they who called upon 
him time and again and tried to bully 
him into joining the union. At last, 



when they saw that it was no use, they 
told him that they would 'get him.' They 
have." 

Promised to Make it Warm for Him. 

"Once these men, Sumner and Turner, 
called at the house and tried every argu- 
ment to persuade Speyer to rejoin the 
union, but he remained obdurate. They 
then resorted to threats, but he paid no 
atention to them. The union agents 
finally left, declaring that they would 
make it so warm for him in Kensington 
and West Pullman that he would have to 
leave. He told them to go ahead and try 
it." 

The husband, before he lapsed into un- 
consciousness, told the officers of the law 
of three men who had been posing as 
railroad detectives, and in this way had 
for several weeks been learning of his 
house, his barn, his coinings and goings. 
"Find the men," he said, "who passed 
as railroad detectives, and you will find 
the men who did me. Sumner and others 
are back of this, and the three are only 
tools of theirs and members of the 'edu- 
cational' gang." 

These were about his last words before 
he went down into the dark valley where 
men battle for their lives. The officials 
of the union were arrested and, as usual, 
denied all knowledge of and participation 
in the assault on the unoffending man. 
These denials are, of course, to be ex- 
pected. Men who are willing to murder 
do not stop at lying. It is one of the 
characteristics of all lodges that their 
members do not think it wrong to con- 
ceal what will be to the disadvantage of 

the order. 

A Chorus of Lies. 

I think you will all remember cases 
where secret societies, having committed 
the crime of murder, add to it this lesser 
offense. When William Morgan had 
been killed by the Masons they reported 
him to have been s€er ; *i alro^t every 



164 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



part of the globe. Precisely the same 
thing occurred after the Clan-na-Gael 
had killed Dr. Cronin. The number of 
persons, in different places widely sepa- 
rated, who declared that they had seen 
the man who was lying stark and stiff 
in a Chicago catch-basin, showed how 
perfectly the order understood the art of 
lying and how willing the members 
were to practice it. 

We have the same truth illustrated in 
the case of the Federation of Miners, in 
the West. Harry Orchard told a 
straightforward and consistent story. 
All the facts that could be ascertained 
confirmed it. But because the secret or- 
ders do not call in witnesses, when they 
are about to kill men, there was a fail- 
ure to convict. 

There have now been about forty mur- 
ders of the same sort in that region. 
Who killed these men? Harry Orchard 
says that the Federation killed them. 
There is a general denial and a sugges- 
tion that probably the mine-owners killed 
them so as to bring the Federation into 
disrepute. The essential fact is, that 
nearly half a hunded men have been 
killed and that no one has been convict- 
ed of one of the crimes. How can such 
things be ? The answer is easy and ob- 
vious ; all you require is a secret order, 
and the thing can be accomplished. 
Black=Hand Societies. 
An article in The Broadway Magazine 
for September, has an article on the mur- 
der societies of New York which bear 
the above name. This article asserts that 
not less than thirty thousand persons in 
that city live on the product of Black- 
Hand work and that the annual tax lev- 
ied and collected by the murderers of 
this lodge is not less than six million dol- 
lars, or ten dollars for each Italian in 
the city. This seems well-nigh incredi- 
ble, but so many impossibles are now be- 



ing proved true that we cannot doubt as 
easily as we once could. 

The plain fact is that men do not, in 
the long run, sustain organizations for 
fun. When they organize, and support 
at large expense, an order, they expect 
to get something out of it. It is also ob- 
vious that they expect to get from each 
society which they support, something 
different from what they obtain from 
other organizations with which they are 
connected. If they do not, why do they 
tax themselves for the new order? 

If the lodge is simply a social body, an 
insurance society, or a Christian church, 
why is it secret? Scores and hundreds 
and thousands of social, insurance, and 
Christian bodies are doing their blessed 
work in every part of the world. None 
of them find it needful to do the work 
they carry forward, in secret. On the 
contrary, they seek every means of mak- 
ing their enterprises known. The ex- 
pense of publicity is one of the most im- 
portant items in the management of all 
modern business and philanthropic insti- 
tutions. The question which every man 
engaged in a legitimate calling is con- 
tinually asking is : "How can I get to the 
people?" 

Even secret orders themselves feel 
this same need and at times act on this 
same principle. What is the meaning of 
the dedication of halls, the public instal- 
lation of officers, the efforts of lodgemen 
to get invited to lay the corner-stones of 
public buildings, the efforts which they 
make once a year to get into some church 
and have some minister dishonor the 
church which feeds him and glorify the 
secret society? The reason for all this 
is perfectly plain ; these are efforts to se- 
cure public attention. But when the or- 
ders get down to their real work of de- 
grading men, rivaling the church, elect- 
ing their tools to office, or protecting 



October. 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1G5 



criminals, the world is shut out. Now 
there is no brass band. All is still as be- 
fore a storm. 

Blackmail, assassination, the asassina- 
tion.of reputation, conpiracy against the 
church, conspiracy against the state — any 
Black-Hand work which men have in 
contemplation, requires a secret organi- 
zation to make it effective. 

Not in a Lodge for a Year. 

f hi? is one of the remarks which we 

hear continually repeated, with variations. 
And it is notable that the members of 
lodges who do not go are the ones who 
Sfive it character. The loafer and drink- 
er never tell you how seldom they go to 
lodge. This is just what one would ex- 
pect. The worthy men who do not go, 
who do not even know what the order is 
doing, give it standing in the commu- 
nity ; and the worthless members carry it 
on and do the dark deeds to which a se- 
cret order is adapted. 

During the last year or two there has 
been a revival of the sense of responsi- 
bility for the acts of organizations with 
which men are connected. Bank officers 
who remained at home while others stole 
the funds of their banks, have been sent 
to jail, not because they were thieves, but 
because they allowed other people to steal 
money which it was their duty to guard. 
It is a self-evident truth that, when a 
man lends the support of his name and 
character to an order, it is his duty to 
attend its meetings and know that its 
acts are justifiable. It is safe to say that 
if this one thing were done, a large share 
of the scoundrel proceedings of lodges 
would instantly cease. Men say, "How 
can it be true that an order does such 
infamous things when such good men 
are connected with it?" The answer is, 
that those good men know nothing of 
what is being done. They are at home 
with their families, they are at their 
places of business, they are in some 



place of healthful recreation, they are 
somewhere away from the lodge. 

Another fact Noted. 

In this connection it is well to remem- 
ber what we have often said, that no one 
can tell what a man will do when he is 
tied to a secret order. I remember well 
the look of Mr. Samuel D. Greene, when 
he told me how, in the lodge, the night 
William Morgan was condemned to die, 
he waited for the votes of the two 
preachers who were there. It was terri- 
bly dramatic. The lodge Master passed 
the question around from man to man, 
"What shall be done with Brother Mor- 
gan, who is revealing the secret work of 
our order?" Lodgeman after lodgeman 
answered, "Kill him." Mr. Greene said/' I 
thought that when he reached the 
preachers they would say, 'No ; that 
would be murder,' but both of them an- 
swered, just as the rest had, 'Kill him, 
Kill him.' " 

Cain killed Abel, and from that day 
to this the false faith has always mur- 
dered those who have resisted its dark 
designs. Even a true faith, when it be- 
comes corrupted, does the same. The 
strange and terrible things which have 
been done in the name of the Christian 
religion, can be accounted for only on 
this principle, that an order, of religious 
character, will make men into demons 
whenever it ceases to be occupied and 
controlled by the Holy Spirit. 

This should make us all thoughtful, 
careful, prayerful for ourselves. \\ e 
have no security of our standing so long 
as one instant, except as we are upheld 
by the Holy One. The story of Abra- 
ham, of Noah, of David, of Peter, of 
every saint, is this same story. We are 
complete in Jesus Christ, and through 
Him we can do all things which we 
ought to do; but without HIM. we can 
do nothing that is gooch 



160 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



High=School Fraternities in Chicago. 

It is very encouraging to see the school 
authorities in this city standing so firmly 
by the rules which they have made for 
the abolition of secret societies in the 
public schools. At the opening this fall, 
the young people were required to sign 
pledges that they would obey the anti- 
fraternity regulation. Most of them, as 
was to be expected, at once complied 
with the rule of the Board. As also was 
to be expected, the secret-society boys 
gathered on the porches of their frater- 
nity-houses, smoked their pipes, sang 
their songs, and in various ways showed 
what great persons they were. Whether 
they had women in these secret-society 
houses at night, or not, we do not know. 
We do know, on the authority of the 
President of the Board of Education, 
that they did have them there in the days 
when fraternities were permitted in the 
schools. 

The Force of Righteous Law. 

The power of a good law is like the 
force of gravitation; it works silently, 
constantly, and most mightily. The 
young men and women who are being- 
furnished an education which a king's 
ransom could not have purchased a lit- 
tle while ago, at the expense of the tax- 
payers, and who repaid the generosity of 
the city with insubordination and inso- 
lence, when they found themselves really 
in the street, began to think. At last, un- 
der protest, they agreed to sign the 
pledge to be law-abiding, if they might 
be permitted to return. This was al- 
lowed, and all but one of them has gone 
back to school. 

No one can tell just what the outcome 
will be. If these young people, who have 
been taking their first lessons in lodgery, 
become good and loyal members of the 
school community, it will be a great vic- 
tory for them over themselves. If they 
can put aside their vanity, their self- 



conceit, their pride, and their other vices r 
they will grow into worthy men and wo- 
men. If they do as lodges tend to make 
folk do and try secretly to carry on their 
fraternities, they will be like other hypo- 
crites and liars. We ought to hope and 
work for the best. 

No one can fail to see that these young 
people have an excuse. They have been 
surrounded by a lodge atmosphere all 
their lives. Their fathers, brothers, in 
some instances even their mothers, have 
been members of secret organizations 
and have encouraged the young people in 
their evil ways. There are still a few 
preachers who are willing to sell them- 
selves to the lodges and who preach their 
lodge-advertising sermons in their pulpits 
from time to time. How can we expect 
boys and girls of sixteen to twenty to un- 
derstand the character and tendency of 
the orders when those who are so much 
older, and should be so much wiser, set 
such an example as this? 

Plants Which Must Be Rooted Up. 

We are all inclined to walk by sight 
rather than by faith. When the Word of 
God declares that all plants which He 
has not planted are to be rooted up, it 
is natural to feel, if we do not say, "How 
can this be?" Yet no student of history 
can fail to be impressed with the fact 
that all the past testifies to the truth of 
this word. 

It is natural for us to ask for as much 
of righteousness as we think we can ob- 
tain; whereas we should demand all that 
the honor of God requires. The position 
of a saint in this world is that of an am- 
bassador. His only concern is to repre- 
sent his government correctly. It is the 
business of his superiors to make their 
claims good. If the messenger scales 
down his orders to what he imagines he 
can secure, he is not representing his sov- 
ereign ; he is misrepresenting him. God 
has never yet agreed to divide the em- 



October. 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1G7 



pire of the world with the devil, in order 
to secure peace. If Jesus declined this 
proposition in the desert, is it probable 
that He will accept after these nineteen 
centuries of victory? 

The Terms Are "Unconditional 
Surrender." 
These words, which made General 
Grant famous, are echoes of the law of 
Jehovah. He did not wish slavery modi- 
fied or improved ; He wished it abolished, 
and it was. It will be even so with the 
trade in intoxicating liquors. In like 
manner He will deal with all things 
which dishonor Him and destroy His 
people. As His representatives, it is our 
duty to demand the utter abolition of the 
secret society system. It used- to be said 
of certain things, that they should be 
"mended or ended." The lodges cannot 
be mended. They are hopelessly evil. 
They are plants which God did not plant. 
To suggest that He is responsible for 
them is a blasphemy. This being the 
case, they are to be destroyed, We have 
no right to modify the demand ; we have 
no right to doubt that the One who 
makes it will see that it is answered by 
a complete submission. 

As to the time when, that is a totally 
different matter, nor does it concern us 
in the least. The times and seasons are 
in His power and He will arrange them 
as to Him seems good. In this, however, 
as in other things, we should remember 
the words of the Lord Jesus, how He 
said, "Behold, I come quickly;" and our 
hearts should be prompt to echo the cry 
of the Revelator, "Even so, come, Lord 
Jesus." 

In hope of His appearing, 

Fraternally yours, 
CHARLES A. BLANCHARD. 



"More people have marched up to the 
cannon's mouth with their mouths than 
in any other way." 



CHRIST, OUR NATION'S KING. 

REV. J. M. FOSTER, BOSTON. 

On Friday evening, June 26th, as the 
sun was setting, the remains of Ex-Pres- 
ident Cleveland were laid to rest in yon- 
der cemetery at Princeton, N. J., where 
he sleeps until the last trump shall sound 
and the dead shall arise. His career ex- 
tended from 1837 to 1908, filling up the 
three score and ten years which sum up 
the days and years we see. 

As clerk in a store, as Mayor of Buf- 
falo, as Governor of New York, as Presi- 
dent of the United States for two terms, 
as attorney pleading before the Supreme 
Court of the United States, and as pri- 
vate citizen, he was a man among men. 
Though a lifelong Democrat, he was 
greater than his party, and" strong- 
enough to antagonize his party when the 
cause of truth demanded it. 

There are three mighty men in our day, 
who command popular favor— Roosevelt, 
Bryan, and Cleveland ; as there were 
three mightier men who drew the people 
— Lincoln, Grant, and Blaine ; and three 
still mightier men before them — Wash- 
ington, Jefferson, and Adams.. 

The world is looking for a strong, si- 
lent man to be ruler. God appointed at 
the beginning a perfect man should rule. 
To Adam in the Garden of Eden He 
said, "Have dominion !" The condition 
of his holding this authority was, perfect 
obedience. But Adam disobeyed, through 
the guile of Satan, and the scepter fell 
from his hand. The old serpent seized 
the scepter and held it. "The whole 
world lieth in the wicked one." He is the 
god of this world. But it was not God's 
design to allow a fallen angel to hold the 
government of earth. And in order to 
realize His original purpose He sent His 
own Son, the second Adam, who fulfilled 
all righteousness, who became obedient 
unto death, even the death of the cross. 
And for the obedience of death He was 
crowned with glory, and honor. The 
perfect Man, Christ Jesus, is upon the 
throne. 

1. His mission as King is to destroy 
the works of the devil. In His parable 
Satan is the strong man who holds the 
house of this world. But Christ is the 
stronger Man, who bound Satan and 
spoiled his goods. "He spoiled principal- 



168 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



ities and powers, and made a show of 
them openly, triumphing over them in 
His cross." "Through death He de- 
stroyed him that had the power of death, 
that is, the devil; and delivered them who 
through fear of death were all their life- 
time subject to bondage." 

When Christ cast out the legion of 
devils from the man who lived in the 
tombs, they were permitted to enter into 
the herd of swine, about two thousand, 
feeding on the mountain, and they ran 
violently down a steep place into the sea 
and were choked. Our Lord came from 
Calvary with Satan and all his hierarchy 
chained to His chariot-wheels. But He 
permitted them to enter into the Jewish 
nation, and they ran violently upon the 
Roman legions and were destroyed. 
Then the devils entered Rome pagan, and 
they ran upon the "Barbarian hordes'' 
from the North and were broken in 
pieces. Then the devils entered into Rome 
papal, and that system of iniquity is 'fall- 
ing before indignant nations, and they 
are eating her flesh and burning her, as 
it were, with fire. The devils are now in 
the secret lodges, the liquor saloons and 
the unscriptural and diabolical systems of 
false religion, and they must fall. 

The man possessed said his name was 
Legion. And when we think of Chris- 
tian Science, Spiritualism, Mormonism, 
Masonry, New Theology, Higher Criti- 
cism, and Roman and Greek Christianity, 
none of which have a gospel that will 
save, we cannot help saying in our time, 
"Their name is Legion, for they are 
many." But at the command of Jesus the 
legion came out and their victim was 
saved. And at His command the legion 
of devils will come out of our national 
body and Uncle Sam will sit at the feet 
of King Jesus, clothed and in his right 
mind. 

2. His mission is to overturn all that 
is unholy in organized society. In Acts 
iy we learn that when Paul and Silas 
preached the gospel in Thessalonica, a 
mob attacked the house of their host and 
haled him before the magistrate, crying, 
"These that have turned the world up- 
side down are come hither also ; whom 
Jason hath received: and these all do 
contrary to the decrees of Caesar, saying 
that there is another King, one Jesus." 



When Nebuchadnezzar carried the Jews 
captive to Babylon the scepter of Judah 
was held by the Chaldean emperor for a 
season. After the return it was held by 
the Medo-Persian Emperor. Then by 
the Greek Emperor. And while the Ro- 
man Emperor held it, the Messiah ap- 
peared. God said by the prophet : "I will 
overturn, overturn, OVERTURN it 
(the scepter), until He come whose right 
it is (the Messiah), and I will give it 
Him." The three overturnings were 
three revolutions — first the Chaldean, 
then the Medo-Persian, and then the Gre- 
cian. And while the Roman Empire held 
sway the Shiloh came. In Revelation 
8: 13 there were three woes, represent- 
ing three distinct visitations of the di- 
vine judgments. Woe, woe, woe, to the 
inhabiters of the earth, because of God's 
wrath upon the Roman Latin Empire 
first, upon the. Greek Roman Empire sec- 
ond, and upon the Papal Roman Empire, 
the "Holy Roman Empire," third. 

He overturned slavery in this land 
when the testimony of Phillips, Garri- 
son, Love joy, and John Brown had been 
finished. He will overturn the secret 
lodge system when the testimony of 
Blanchard, Stoddard and Hinman has 
been finished. He will destroy the secu- 
larism of our land when the testimony of 
the Covenanters has been completed. 

3. His mission is to bring the nations 
into allegiance to His throne. He must 
reign until all His enemies are made His 
footstool. His people defer the day of 
triumph, by joining forces with His foes. 
The Holy Spirit is not yet given because 
Jesus is not yet glorified. The Republi- 
can National Convention nominated for 
their standard-bearer a man who denies 
the deity of Christ and takes special 
pleasure in holding in his lap the mother 
of harlots, toying with her locks and en- 
joying her blandishments. 

It seems to me that the ignoble defeat 
of Taft and the triumphant election of 
Bryan for President is a consummation 
devoutly to be wished. But our Saviour 
King will decide. 

July 3, 1908. 



The hand of the toiler is the world's 
friendly helper. 



October, 190S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1G9 




D. H. HARRINGTON. 

David H. Harrington was born Feb- 
ruary 15, 1843, and 'died September 5, 
1908. On October 15, 1879, he married 
Miss Catherene Millikin. To this union 
there were born a son and a daughter; 
the son dying in infancy. Of this fam- 
ily, the. daughter, Miss Blanche Harring- 
ton, alone remains; the mother having 
passed to the better life nearly two years 

since. 

Brother Harrington was a soldier. He 
enlisted May second, 1864, and served 
his country until ..the close of the Civil 
War. Best of all, he was a Christian 
soldier. He became a Christian at an 
early age. He connected himself with 
the Christian, or Disciple, church, and 
for many years, as an officer and superin- 
tendent in the Sabbath-school, served the 
church of his choice. He loved the Word 
of God ; this love being much increased 
as the end drew near. 

His views along reform lines were 
well known. At one time he was induced 
to join a "little lodge." He was not long 
in discovering it was not the place for a 
Christian. Learning of the National 
Christian Association and its work, he^at 
once identified himself with it; and for 
over thirty years he read the Cynosure 
and supported its prinicples. Much of his 
life was spent on the old home farm, 
near Raymond, Ohio. Two years ago 
the farm was sold and he removed to 
Columbus, Ohio. 

The daughter, who survives him, has 
the Christian's hope and will have ^the 
prayers and support of many sympathiz- 



ing friends. The writer, with two broth- 
er ministers, was permitted to speak to 
those who gathered in token of their re- 
spect. W. B. Stoddard. 



KNIGHTS OF THE GOLDEN EAGLE. 

Among the various beneficiary, semi- 
military secret societies which have 
founded their rituals and ceremonies up- 
on the history and pageantry of the Cru- 
saders, is the Knights of the Golden Ea- 
gle, or Chivalric Knights of America. 

The objects of the Order are benevo- 
lence, mutual relief against the trials and 
difficulties attending sickness, distress, 
and death, so far as they may be miti- 
gated by sympathy and pecuniary assist- 
ance ; to care for and protect the widows 
and orphans; to assist those out of em- 
ployment ; to encourage each other in 
business; "to ameliorate the condition of 
humanity in every possible manner ;" to 
stimulate moral and mental culture by 
wholesome precepts, fraternal counsel, 
and social intercourse, to elevate the 
membership to a higher and nobler life, 
and the inculcation and dissemination of 
the principles of benevolence and char- 
ity. 

The ritualistic work of the Knights of 
the Golden Eagle includes three degrees : 
the first, or Pilgrim's ; second, or 
Knight's; third, or Crusader's Degree. 
"The three degrees are symbolic of a 
soldier battling for his faith. He is first 
a Pilgrim, then a Knight, and finally a 
Crusader." The Pilgrim's degree teach- 
es fidelity and eternal faithfulness to God 
and our fellow-man. The Knight's de- 
gree confers the honors of Knighthood, 
arms and equips the Pilgrim, and teach- 
es him veneration for religion, fidelity, 
valor, courtesy, charity, and hospitality. 
The Crusader's degree sends the newly 
made knight forth upon a crusade 
ag*ainst the hosts of evil, armed and 
equipped to conquer opposing foes. The 
ceremonies and lectures are free from 
anything of a frivolous or objectionable 
character. 

The Order has for its motto, "Fidelity, 
Valor, and Honor," a trinity of graces 
taught in its ritual. . It was founded by 
John E. Burbage of Baltimore, Md., who, 
in 1872, conceived the idea of an organi- 



170 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



zation, secret in character, which should 
"go hand in hand with religion," having 
for its theme the struggles of the Chris- 
tian warrior after "the immortal crown," 
by means of symbol and allegory repre- 
senting "the passing through the wilder- 
ness of sin and woe on the journey to the 
Heavenly Castle." 

There is reason to believe their ritual 
is indebted to membership in the Order 
of those who had been brought to light 
and had been advanced in the parent of 
all modern secret societies. With such 
seed, the blossoms could not fail to be 
numerous and beautiful. Philadelphia 
Odd Fellows became interested, and took 
the new Order of Knighthood to the City 
of Brotherly Love in 1875, and by April, 
1876, the Grand Castle of Pennsylvania 
was organized. 

The requisite qualifications for mem- 
bership in the Knights of the Golden 
Eagle are that the applicant be a white 
man, eighteen years of age, of good mor- 
al character, a believer in the existence of 
a Supreme Being and of the Christian 
faith, free from mental or bodily infirm- 
ity, competent to support himself and 
family, a law-abiding resident of the 
country in which he lives, and have suffi- 
cient education to sign his own applica- 
tion for membership. 

The Temple degree, or Ladies of the 
Golden Eagle, is open to women of good 
moral character, not less than sixteen 
years of age, whether relatives of 
Knights of the Golden Eagle or not, as 
well as to members of the Order of the 
Knights of the Eagle. This auxiliary to 
the Eagle Knights has social and benefi- 
ciary objects, and fills much the same 
place with respect to the Knights of the 
Golden Eagle as the Daughters of Re- 
bekah do to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and the Companions of the 
Forest to the Foresters of America. The 
"Lady Eagles" meet in Temples, and 
regulate their own weekly and funeral 
benefits and dues.— Cyclop a dia of Fra- 
ternities. 



FORMATION OF THE WHIG PARTY. 

"In the election of 1836 a new party 
combination, against the Jackson Democ- 
racy, was formed. It united those known 
formerly as National Republicans with a 
body of 'Anti-Masons' which had sprung 
up in New York within recent years and 
spread thence to other States. The mem- 
bers of this new party adopted the old 
English name of Whigs. Their main can- 
didate for President, against Van Bu- 
ren, was General William Henry Harri- 
son ; but Daniel Webster was nominated 
and supported by the Massachusetts 
Whigs/' 

—From" Seventy Centuries of the Life 
of Mankind," vol. 2, p. 411; by /, H. 
Lamed, author of "History for Ready 
Reference" and other historical works. * 



"If full-course dinners grew upon the 
trees all ready for eating, some would 
not touch them till they had been spoiled 
by a cook." 



SAMUEL D. GREENE. 

In Preside]! t Blauehard's Letter, in this 
number, he refers to Samuel D. Greene, of 
whom we promised a more extended sketch 
this month. The sketch is written by the 
late President Jonathan Blanchard.-PJditor. 
It was about the year 1866, while in 
Boston, a letter from Dr. Edward Beech- 
er was forwarded to me, earnestly ad- 
vising me to make the acquaintance of 
Mr. Samuel D. Greene, who, he said, 
was a member of his (Park Street) 
church while he was pastor there ; a good 
man, and one who knew more and felt 
more deepjy on the subject of Freema- 
sonry than any man he ever knew. 
t I found .Mr. Greene in Chelsea, and sat 
till two o'clock that night thrilled with 
his narrative. Born in Leicester, Mass., 
in 1788, he taught school in Providence' 
Rhode Island, and in Thompson, Conn. ; 
manied in 1810; went west, and, in 1822,' 
opened and kept the Park Hotel in Ba- 
tavia, Genesee County, N. Y. This was. 
then, the extreme frontier, and his life 
went on as that of an inn-keeper in rude 
society. By request of a minister he 
opened his hotel for religious meetings, 
and, after an agonized and remarkable 
religious experience, he, with his wife, 
joined Rev. Calvin Colton's (Presby- 
terian) church. Mrs. Colton taught a 
school in his hotel. 

At that time all the prominent church 
male members in Western New York be- 
longed to the Masonic lodge, and believ- 



October. 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



171 



ed it the twin and handmaid of Chris- 
tianity. The oldest deacon in the church 
which Mr. Greene joined used to say, "I 
should as soon think of speaking* against 
the God of heaven as against Freema- 



sonrv 



* 



* * * j} ie Batavia lodge master 
was the leading Presbyterian elder; the 
Episcopal minister and every male mem- 
ber of his church were members ; and 
when Mr. Greene had been stripped, 
blindfolded, and fooled through the En- 
tered Apprentice degree, and permitted 
to put on his clothes, he sat down in the 
lodge by the side of this deacon, who so 
profoundly revered the lodge. 

"Deacon," whispered Mr. Greene, "is 
that really Masonry, or have they been 
fooling me?" The deacon assured him 
all was right, and would be explained. 

William Morgan 

Was a citizen of Batavia at that time, 
a member of that lodge, and intimate 
friend of Mr. Greene. He had married 
Lucinda Pendleton, daughter of a Meth- 
odist minister in Virginia, his native 
State. His wife was younger than him- 
self, scarce sixteen when married. Mor- 
gan was gentlemanly and agreeable. He 
drank liquor, as did all men, saints and 
sinners, at that day, "Freemasons" in 
chief. But he was not a drunkard. His 
brewery in York, Upper Canada, was 
burnt down, and he reduced to poverty 
from affluence. He then came back into 
the States, and resumed his trade of a 
bricklayer. Greene met him in Batavia in 
1822, four years before his murder by 
Masons. Mrs. Morgan was the mother 
of two children, twenty-three years of 
age when Masons killed her husband, 
who was a prominent member of Bata- 
via Lodge, No. 433, and lecturer of the 
lodge. 

In May, 1826, Mr. Greene had fallen 
off and been absent for two months, 
when, in the latter part of July, he was 
summoned by special notice to his lodge. 
The business, introduced by Ebenezer 
Mix, Surrogate of the county, was the 
charge that Morgan was writing out Ma- 
sonry, and David C. Miller was to print 
it. Mr. Greene took his seat in the lodge 
and sat astonished while he saw that the 
terrible oaths he had taken, in terms so 



extravagant that he had not supposed 
them anything but balderdash, were now 
to be enforced in the death of his neigh- 
bor and friend Morgan. A letter, real or 
forged, was read, signed by De Witt 
Clinton, Governor of the State, and 
"Grand High Priest of the Royal Arch 
Chapter," which ran thus: "The book 
must be suppressed at the cost of blood 
and treasure. If any are prosecuted in 
the courts, your sheriffs, lawyers and 
juiie- will doubtless be Masons; but, in 
the last resort, I am Governor and 1 will 
pardon you." A deacon in Greene's 
own church said, "The sacrilegious 
w r retch ! If he attempts to carry out so 
wicked a deed there are officers and mem- 
bers of churches who will execute the 
Masonic penalties upon him, let alone 
outsiders." 

(To be continued.) 



HOO=HOOS IN CONCATENATION. 

At nine minutes after 9 o'clock this 
morning, the ninth day of the ninth 
month, the seventeenth national conven- 
tion of the Concatenated Order of Hoo- 
Hoos will be opened with impressive 
ceremonies in the banquet hall of the Au- 
ditorium Hotel, which will be attended 
by 21,000 members of the order in per- 
son or by letter and telegram. 

The feature of the gathering will be 
the embalming of Past Supreme Snarks, 
who then becomes a member of the an- 
cient house, and as a mummy becomes a 
deity. This ceremony will occur at the 
Studebaker Theater Friday afternoon. 
Supreme Snark of the Universe, John S. 
Bonner, of Houston, Tex., being the ob- 
ject for embalming. — Chicago Daily Tri- 
bune, Sept. 9, 1908. 



The vision of the new heaven and the 
new earth is terrestrial, not celestial. All 
remedial agencies have as their objective 
a human world transformed and regener- 
ated. — Bishop Gore. 



Give me heart touch with all that live, 
And strength to speak my word; 

But if that is denied me, give 
The strength to live unheard. 

— Edwin Markham. 



172 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



tutorial 



IF SENSITIVE, THEN VULNERABLE. 

The rudest and hardest characters have 
vulnerable spots, like game that is hard 
to kill. Utter recklessness about* many 
other things is consistent with resentful 
sensitiveness respecting some single vir- 
tue or vice. While in some aspects the 
adherents of lodges may appear stupid, 
and in some shameless and unprincipled, 
they are liable to show sensitiveness when 
the sword finds the vulnerable spot. In 
fact, the more vicious lodgery becomes, 
the more sensitive, it sometimes appears 
when attacked. Especially, when Free- 
masonry and Oddfellows-hip are in ques- 
tion, the latter is less sensitive. Cor- 
respondingly, it is rather less vicious. 

The scales of the lodge saurian are 
hard enough to shed the rattling arrows 
of vague dislike. A bad impression of 
the system or of an order, is what any 
one is welcome to have. Mentioning it 
may happen to evoke some threadbare 
plea, like being founded on the Bible. 
Your prejudice will be treated as some- 
thing due to ignorance, and with a smile 
or sneer or supercilious repudiation, the 
lodge was will go complacently on his 
way. 

There is*, however, one sensitive spot 
in the lodge, and it can be found by 
noticing* where is its chief fortification, 
or to what shield it most anxiously clings. 
This consciously vulnerable point is the 
diligently guarded point. Its protection 
is held essential to real intrenchment and 
perpetuity of possession. Such conscious- 
ness of vital necessity and vulnerability, 
is an index to the point of successful at- 
tack. 

Secrecy is the vital organ of the sys- 
tem ; this is that which is guarded; even/ 
initiate is impressed with its importance; 
oaths bind him to guard secrecy. The 
intrenchments of secrecy are darkness 
and silence. As soon as .secrecy sees 
light or hears truth, it is alarmed and 
angry, it is shamed, it faints, it begins to 
die. Until this happens, secrecy fears 
nothing else. It can whisper erroneous 
teaching, it can teach vicious principles 
and perpetrate evil acts. Secrecy is the 



fortress into which lodgery runs, and on 
its walls it posts its guards. 

We can learn from the enemy. Where 
he is chiefly sensitive and apprehensive, 
he must be consciously vulnerable. After 
this enemy has told us wherein his great 
strength lieth, we need no longer bind 
him with futile cords and green withes, 
nor need we guard the city gates. We 
may now shear off his locks at once. Why 
neglect what he himself confesses to be 
fatally effective, and prefer our futile ex- 
periments ? 

Mere reprobation of secrecy is not 
what answers this demand. That is like 
bombarding its stone walls with paper 
pellets. Destroy secrecy by making the 
secrets, in detail, an exposed shame. Ex- 
pose secrets as facts, and you need hard- 
ly deal with secrecy as a principle. Break 
open the doors, blow up the walls, and 
let all look in. Leave lies and sancti- 
monious hypocrisies no material to work 
with and no ground to stand on. 

"Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, 
As, to be bated, needs but to be seen." 

Let it then be seen; let its favorite 
protection be rent away. The initiate 
dare not tell the truth, and does not al- 
ways seem to know it thoroughly; the 
uninitiated, if also untaught and thought- 
less, cannot tell what they do not know ; 
it is for those who are free and enlight- 
ened, freely to turn on the light which 
is the one thing secrecy dreads. Where 
its fear cringes, thither let our hope 
speed. 



Mr. Ezra A. Cook, connected with the 
Association in various capacities since its 
organization in 1868, has a place of in- 
terest to Cynosure visitors in the city, 
known as his Branch Office. It is locat- 
ed at 388 Dearborn street, within easy 
reach by street cars from all parts of the 
city and only a few doors north of the 
union depot on Polk street. There Mr.. 
Cook labors assiduously for the welfare 
of the Chinese. On the second floor of 
the building he has a commodious and 
pleasant hall, and here meet the Oriental 
League and Chinese church and Sunday- 
school. 



October, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



173 



THROUGH A TUNNEL. 

In one of his signed articles in Out- 
Dumb Animals for September, Mr. 
George T. Angell considers the quality 
of the two leading- candidates for the 
Presidency. He remarks : 

"We are not aware that either Taft 
or Bryan ever said or did anything for 
humanity similar to what has been re- 
corded in regard to Abraham Lincoln, 
Grant, and Sherman. Neither of these 
candidates is the man we should choose, 
to hold, for the next four years, the great 
.office of President of the United States." 

This is the more interesting, perhaps, 
as the utterance, of a man who, while he 
was yet rather young, acquired a compe- 
tence by the practice of law. He had said 
earlier in the article: 

"Remembering- that whoever is to be 
elected President of the United States is 
to command all our armies and navies for 
four years, with the power of involving 
us and the civilized world in great wars, 
or maintaining peace and harmony, we 
feel a profound interest in everything 
which tends to show the good sense, de- 
liberate judgment, and peace-loving char- 
acteristics of Taft and Bryan." 

He finds lack of wisdom betrayed in 
what Taft said of both Grant and Lincoln 
at Grant's tomb ; and the same ominous 
sign in his going to Oyster Bay to con- 
sult about his campaign speech with 
Roosevelt, whom: Governor and Senator 
Boutwell had called the "most dangerous 
man in America." He presumes Taft to 
adopt Roosevelt's notion of having "all 
the schoolboys in the United States 
taught to fire army rifles, so that they 
can be better qualified to kill." 

Bearing now in mind these criticisms 
of one candidate, and remembering, also, 
that Mr. Angell has at previous times 
spoken of belonging to a secret order of 
which Mr. Roosevelt is a member, and of 
having himself founded a chapter of a 
Greek-letter society in Dartmouth col- 
lege, which shared in his education with 
Brown, it becomes the more interesting 
to note the single remaining criticism 
that he makes when he turns to Bryan 
and says : 

«* « * On the other hand, we saw 
in the morning Herald of July 28, on its 



first^page, that Bryan had recently been 
joining a secret society at Omaha, which 
required him to be blindfolded and sent 
through a tunnel and then to lead a goat 
around while the band played 'Tam- 
many.' " 



ROME SAPPING AND MINING AMERICA 

"Let us hope the day will come when 
the vigorous East, with its teeming Cath- 
olic population, will sustain the' West ; 
and converge their lines until their hands 
meet in a clasp that will signalize the con- 
trol of this country for the faith of Co- 
lumbus, and for the faith of the Mission 
Fathers." 

This is the utterance of the head of the 
Roman Catholic order of Knights of Co- 
lumbus, on the Pacific coast. He is a law - 
yer in Los Angeles, was formerly a pu- 
pil, and later a correspondent, of Cardi- 
nal Merry del Val, secretary of the Pope, 
and is the friend and associate of Roman 
Catholic priests and bishops. His wish 
coincides with their own. 

That it is shared on the eastern coast 
may seem to appear from the report of a 
gathering in Springfield, Mass., which 
was held last May, in a hotel managed 
by John Shea, whose name alone would 
suggest his origin and religion. We cull 
a few items from this report. 

"From early evening to early morning 
two hundred members of Home City 
Council, Knights of Columbus, tog-ether 
with many prominent officials of the or- 
der in this State and others, sat at table 
last night in the dining-room of the 
Haynes hotel, ate of good things from 
the culinary department of Manager 
John Shea, and listened to stirring 
speeches in eulogy of the order and the 
men who have made it what it is in Amer- 
ica. 

" The Twentieth Century Knight' was 
well handled by Dr. A. J. Flanagan of 
this city, who was the first district depu- 
ty in this State. He outlined the history 
of knighthood and spoke of the falling 
off of its glories when it broke away 
from Catholic precepts. He also spoke 
of the wonderful growth of the order 
since it began its new life with something 
to offer to prospective members. Dr. 



174 



CHRISTIAN CiTNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



Flanagan compared the growth and pres- 
tige of the order with that of Masonry. 
"Rev. J. N. Supple, state chaplain, next 
spoke on 'The Catholic Knight.' 



A PROBLEM IN SUBTRACTION. 

One way to estimate the value of any- 
thing, is to consider the effect of its 
possible loss. If the mother should die, 
what would the home be afterward, or 
what would be lost with her? If one 
grade of schools should be discontinued, 
what would be the effect on the system 
of schools, regarded as a whole ? Would 
it be missed? Would its removal do 
harm ? It is easy to multiply such ques- 
tions. 

For many questions, it is easier to find 
answers than to find plausible reasons for 
asking them : if they do not answer 
themselves, they are yet so fully answer- 
ed already, that there can be no reason 
for asking them. But the case is dif- 
ferent when there is controversy over a 
claim. When one party contends that 
something is invaluable, and that its 
service claims reward ; and an opposing 
party denies its worth : then arises oc- 
casion to ask what would be lacking if 
it were gone. 

Inquiries of this kind can be made on 
behalf of the church; for instance: 
'What change in its condition would fol- 
low, if a certain member should leave 
the town? What kind of vacancy would 
it be, if certain officers should resign? 
What would be the effect on its congrega- 
tion, and on its financial help, if the lead- 
ing manufacture of the village should be 
discontinued? It is possible to ask various 
questions of this kind, and many of them 
can be reasonably well answered. 

Included within the scope of such in- 
quiry, are found agencies and institu- 
tions, concerning which it is easy to an- 
swer, that, if they were to disappear, part 
of the loss would fall on the church, 
which would find its field circumscribed 
or its work hindered. The religious pub- 
lishing house is one. Good government 
is another. Schools, surely, could not 
willingly be spared. 

We understand Freemasonry to enter 
a claim. We have an impression that it 
has even ventured to call itself a "hand- 



maid of the church." A handmaid is a 
servant, in whose absence service wouid 
be missed. Where Freemasonry has been 
wanting, what service has the church 
missed that it now enjoys? 

To make it a hypothetical instead of 
historical question: "What help has the 
church now, that it would suffer for lack 
of, after Freemasonry had gone ? Would 
it lack any element of knowledge of the 
Savior? Would it lack the aid of an 
evangelizing agency?" 

If the reply be attempted, that it would 
lack the co-operation of an agency in- 
culcating morality and promoting morals ; 
the question follows, whether the church 
and the lodge define such words as 
morality and morals in the same way; 
also, whether it is not the very issue be- 
tween the church and lodge, on this 
point, that what the lodge teaches and 
promotes, is precisely what the church 
definitely names unmoral, or, in some 
features, immoral. 

It is fair, that this candidate for honors 
that are granted to schools and religious 
books, should pass the examination in 
which they have been marked high. What 
definite and specific things does this 
handmaid do? 

Does she promote church attendance? 
Does she lead as many to church as she 
keeps away? If the balance is on the 
wrong side, she can be spared; the sub- 
traction of such help could be borne. 

Does she teach the gospel of Christ? 
Does she do as much for anything that 
is, in any way, suggestive of the gospel 
that the church teaches, as she does for 
universal theism, deism, paganism, or 
anything called a religion? Does she 
honor anything as being Christ's ? Does 
she, in the interest of false religion, dis- 
honor more than honor Flim ? Or, again, 
does she silence, instead of uttering, dis- 
tinctive Christian teaching? If so, the 
church can spare her. There could be 
greater losses than the subtraction of her 
teaching. 

Does she promote Christian morals? 
Do her rules measure up to the stand- 
ards of Christian ethics? Is the im- 
moral, stronger than the moral element in 
her teaching? If so, subtract the net bal- 
ance, then ask what would the church 






October, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



175 



lose of moral support and aid, in the 
departure of such a handmaid. 

If it would be a shame and reproach 
to a denomination, when it was shown to 
be teaching its adherents to keep the 
secrets of criminals, how can Freema- 
sonry aid the church through such teach- 
ings ? 

If the church demands a type of 
chastity that rises to the standard of per- 
sonal purity, and does not halt at a limit- 
ed bargain, pertaining only to a class 
that does not even include all initiates 
into Masonic degrees ; how can the hand- 
maid be such invaluable moral help as 
cannot be spared? Many, no doubt, 
wish to hear teaching, on this point, that 
can be called liberal. Suppose this hand- 
maid insinuates a suggestion that since 
Masonry is superior morally, it must be 
enough to keep the only obligation of 
this kind she asks the initiate to assume ; 
does such insinuation so help the church 
in its moral work, and so reinforce its 
influence as to social purity, and its high- 
er, broader, fuller law of chastity, that 
there would follow great loss if it should 
be subtracted? Or is this a service of 
the handmaid that could be spared ? 

Churches have lived where there was 
no Freemasonry ; they have tried to con- 
tinue to live after Freemasonry invaded 
their neighborhood ; but they could have 
continued if the handmaid had helped 
her pagan friends elsewhere and not 
meddled with sacred things. Where Ma- 
sonry, like tares, now infests the ground, 
churches could abide the subtraction. 



A CIVIC REVIVAL. 

"A 'Civic Revival' campaign has been 
inaugurated by the International Reform 
Bureau, under the leadership of Rev. Dr. 
Wilbur F. Crafts, the Superintendent, 
Washington, D. C. 

"The general plan is to arrange a pro- 
gramme extending over three days, and 
possibly a week, with addresses by Re- 
form Bureau lecturers, in co-operation 
with local speakers, followed by confer- 
ences with laymen. 

"Local leaders for moral reforms are 
greatly needed. The Reform Bureau 
proposes to furnish information and 
plans, so the pastors can take the matter 
up and train leaders. 



"As far as possible, Bible classes and 
men's clubs will be utilized as a nucleus, 
with possibly the organization of a civic 
club or committee. The first step will be 
to establish a systematic study of re- 
forms. A library will be supplied, with 
a plan of study consisting of a special 
topic for each month. 

"Among the specific reform measures 
being pressed by the Bureau, for 1908-9, 
are: In Congress — bills prohibiting the 
interstate traffic in intoxicants, cigarettes, 
and gambling news ; in the States — a new 
Sunday law for Iowa, an anti-race-track- 
gambling bill for California, an anti- 
cigarette bill for Ohio, and possibly a 
county local option bill in New York." 

This movement is to be cordially wel- 
comed, not only because it will promote 
specific reforms but also because it will 
elevate the general standard, and thus 
help even those reforms it may not at 
once undertake directly. Even though 
theaters, dance halls, lodges, and broth- 
els are not mentioned in what appears to 
be a partial list for the current year, any 
evil is liable to feel the current of a sren- 
eral reform drift and to swing less quiet- 
ly and securely at its own moorings. 



ANTI=MASONRY FOUNDED ON THE 

BIBLE. 

The claim, that Masonry is founded on 
the Bible, having broken down, it is now 
in order to ask on what anti-masonry is 
founded? With neither the spiritual 
truth of the Book nor its moral instruc- 
tion, is the profane and vicious order con- 
sistent in foundation or structure. More- 
over, accredited Masonic authority has 
declared, decisively, that Masonry has 
nothing whatever to do with the Bible, 
that Masonry is not founded on the 
Bible, and that if Masonry was founded 
on the Bible, it would not be Masonry, it 
would be something else. This official 
Masonic pronouncement outrnnks the 
loose talk of private Masons, while it also 
accords with facts of the case. 

Anti-masonry, on the contrary, is 
founded on the Bible, from which it de- 
rives fundamental principles. Antag- 
onizing the order, which is both non-bib- 
lical and anti-biblical it assumes the op- 
posite, or biblical, position. Being found- 



176 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



ed on biblical principles, it has Bible 
weapons at hand. 

In particular, anti-masonry resists that 
personal rejection of Jesus' name and 
teaching, which is distinctively character- 
istic of Masonry. It thus intrenches it- 
self in those scriptures which testify of 
Him, teach us to ask in His name, and 
assure us that only by Him does any 
man come to the Father. Anti-masonry 
antagonizes Masonic antagonism to 
Jesus ; antagonism to Jesus is best antag- 
onized from a biblical foundation. 

Anti-masonry at the same time stands 
against Masonic pretences of salvation 
apart from the Savior. It opposes the 
anti-biblical Masonic notion of using pre- 
cepts of a profane and immoral system 
for the purpose of fitting one's own soul 
for heaven. It disapproves replacing the 
Holy Bible with an unholy Masonic man- 
ual. It sets spirituality opposite form- 
ality, and matches sincerity against hy- 
pocrisy. It speaks Christian truth to si- 
lence Masonic cant, pointing meanwhile 
to the only path that leads to life, and 
clinging to the only hope that anchors the 
soul. While Masonry dreams the empty 
dreams of "a pagan suckled in a creed 
outworn," Anti-masonry turns to the liv- 
ing oracles of God that truly announce 
salvation, founding its doctrine of eternal 
life not on the winter solstice but on the 
Bible. 

As a moral advocate opposing* lodge 
non-morality, Anti-masonry stands on 
the Bible. Instead of promising not to 
defraud a limited coterie, it offers both 
to abstain from all fraud, and, also, Lo 
practice positive generosity limited by no 
bounds or divisions. It teaches chastity 
as a personal virtue, not, like Masonry, 
as a narrowly limited bargain. It ap- 
plies the principle as fully as a Mason 
could, to the case of a third degree 
Mason's wife, then, unlike Masonry, 
equally to all men's wives. It differs 
from Masonry in protecting wives of 
those who have taken the first or second 
degree, and wives of those who have 
taken no degree. The reason of its dif- 
fering in this particular from Masonry, 
is that Anti-masonry is founded on the 
Bible. 

When it condemns partaking of other 



men's sins, and becoming unequally yok- 
ed in concealment of crime, Anti-mason- 
ry assumes a biblical foundation. It is 
biblical in walking in light, and having 
no fellowship with works that sedulously 
seek darkness, and in reproving them. It 
thus manifests itself as founded on the 
Bible. It strikes hands with no criminal. 
It does not swear blindly to possible con- 
federacy. It does not bind itself to aid 
the unjust against the just. It takes no 
pledge to promote the injury of the in- 
nocent, by concealing or otherwise abet- 
ting actual or intended crime or wrong. 
It approves no criminal compact, or con- 
tingent provision for one. The reason is, 
that Anti-masonrv is founded on the 
Bible. 

Being founded on the Bible, Anti- 
masonry is opposite Masonry in honoring 
the King of the Kingdom of Heaven, in 
proclaiming real salvation instead of dis- 
appointing fiction, in preferring biblical 
morality to ungodly immorality, and in 
standing fast in all spiritual and moral 
freedom wherewith Christ hath made us 
free, while refusing to become entangled 
with any yoke of bondage. Being found- 
ed on the Bible, it opposes sudden, rash, 
and reckless oaths that pledge the en- 
snared soul to unknown dilemmas or sins ; 
it supports truth against cant, godliness 
against hypocrisy; it is openly founded 
on the Bible, not secretly on a false pre- 
tense of mysteriously hidden biblical 
foundation. Identified with Christianity, 
it is identically founded on the Bible. 



ADOPTED BY A CONGREGATIONAL 
ASSOCIATION. 

President Bianchard's book on Mod- 
ern Secret Societies contains a copy of 
"Part of a paper adopted by the Illi- 
nois Congregational Association of 
Churches." The quality of this extract 
justifies natural presumptions of the 
ability of such a body to judge a paper 
submitted for its adoption. Its contents 
show the result of studious examination 
and thoughtful analysis. Taken as a 
whole, the paragraph is an epitome of 
reasons, and as such it merited reprint- 
ing in such a book. It may well be 
kept at hand by those who wish occa- 
sionally to refresh, confirm, or balance 



October, 190S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



17' 



their own knowledge, and to render sim- 
ilar or related service to other minds. 
The paragraph reads as follows : 

"There are certain other widespread 
organizations — such as Freemasonry — 
which, we suppose, are in their nature 
hostile to good citizenship and true re- 
ligion, because they exact initiatory 
oaths of blind compliance and conceal- 
ment, incompatible with the claims of 
equal justice toward man and a good 
conscience toward God; because they 
may easily, and sometimes have actually, 
become combinations against the due 
process of law and government ; because, 
while claiming a religious character, 
they, in their rituals, deliberately with- 
hold all recognition of Christ as their 
only Savior, and of Christianity as the 
only true religion ; because, while they 
are, in fact, nothing but restricted part- 
nerships, or companies, for mutual in- 
surance and protection, they ostenta- 
tiously parade this characterless engage- 
ment as a substitute for brotherly love 
and true benevolence ; because they bring 
good 'men into confidential relations to 
bad men ; and because, while, in the- 
ory, they supplant the church of 
Christ, they do also, in fact, largely 
tend to withdraw the sympathy and ac- 
tive zeal of professing Christians from 
their respective churches. Against all 
connection with such associations we 
earnestly advise the members of our 
churches and exhort them : 'Be ye not 
unequally yoked together with unbeliev- 
ers.'" 

Returning, now, to analyze this com- 
prehensive statement, we find the fol- 
lowing topics noted: 

a. Sworn incompatibility with good 
citizenship. 

b. Conspiracy against law and gov- 
ernment. 

c. Exclusion of Christianity, and of 
the Savior. 

d. Substitution of restricted, busi- 
ness-like partnership, for love and be- 
nevolence. 

e. Confidential binding of good to 
bad men. 

f. Theoretical rivalry, and practical 
injury of the church, involving injury 
of its members. 



g. Warning, or admonition. 

Again returning, to examine this 
analysis, we find every point well attest- 
ed. With good citizenship, Masonic 
obligations are not only formally and 
obviously incompatible, but they" have 
been so pronounced by eminent lawyers 
and statesmen ranking among the best 
judges of what comports with govern- 
ment and law. It should hardly be nec- 
essary to do more than cite one or two 
typical representatives, like ex-President 
John Quincy Adams, and the great jur- 
ist, Daniel Webster; though we might 
add others, including General Washing- 
ton, who, having once, in his younger 
years, been initiated, afterward pro- 
nounced Masonry capable of being used 
for the worst of purposes. It is enough, 
however, merely to know some of its 
obligations, which are unfit for utterance 
by a true citizen. 

Similar examination proves the point 
respecting the relations of Masonry and 
Christianity. The alleged practical re- 
sults of its interference with law or gov- 
ernment, and antagonism to the church 
and Christianity, are attested by compe- 
tent authority, as well as by history and 
the course of events and condition of 
things. Hence, the warning, scriptur- 
ally expressed, is well founded. Such 
an utterance, regarded as a whole, does 
honor to the Association by which it was 
made, and merits candid consideration. 



"During several years the compiler 
was a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
While he regarded the ceremonies of the 
order with disgust, and its oaths with ab- 
horrence, he supposed there existed prin- 
ciples in the institution which were pure 
and holy. In the peculiar providence of 
God, he was led to investigate the sub- 
ject; he found it wholly corrupt, its mor- 
ality a shadow ; its benevolence, selfish- 
ness ; its religion, infidelity ; and that as 
a system it was an engine of Satan, cal- 
culated to enslave the children of men, 
and pour contempt on the Most High." — 
Elder David Bernard, in introduction to 
his book, "Light on Free Masonry." 



We cannot brine: morning- in another's 



:-. 



life if there is no sunrise in our own. 



178 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



Hew0 of ©ut Pori 



FROM LOUISIANA AGENT. 

Hammond, La., Sept. 5, 1908. 

I had planned a trip through my dis- 
tict, in the interest of the Woman's Asso- 
ciation, and had hoped to get quite a few 
subscriptions for the Cynosure, but I 
was hindered. I love the work as well, 
if not better than when I first began. I 
understand it better. 

The Good Samaritans held their grand 
lodge session at this place last month. 
Several of them were old friends from 
New Orleans, and they stopped at our 
home. It was four o'clock Sunday 
morning, to my surprise, before they all 
got in from their lodge meeting, and the 
minister was so tired that he was unable 
to drive to Ponchatoula to hold his Sab- 
bath services. 

I distributed what tracts I had, and 
as the minister could not get away, I 
read him several extracts from the dear 
old Cynosure. They seemed to get of- 
fended, but I think the seed that was 
sown will some day spring up. 

I will leave for the National Baptist 
convention at Lexington, Kentucky, on 
Monday, the 14th instant. Send me a 
goodly number of assorted tracts, and a 
few copies of the Cynosure. I hope to 
be able to do some real good work for 
the Association while at the convention. 
(Mrs.) Alice E. Randle. 



MICHIGAN AGENT'S REPORT. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., Sept. 18, 1908. 
Dear Cynosure : — I remained at Hast- 
ings camp meeting for several days after 
my last letter. Quite a number became 
so interested in the former discussion of 
the lodge question that I was requested 
to give another address on it. I did so 
on August 20th, discussing "The Rela- 
tion of Oaths to Morality and Christian- 
ity." It was well received; some even 
declaring that it cleared up some of the 
difficulties in the Christian life apart 
from the question of lodgerv. Here, as 
at other places, I got quite a number of 
new subscriptions for the Cynosure, -sold 
some books, and distributed tracts. But 
the most encouraging things were the 



evident increase of interest in antise- 
crecy, and the number of promises of 
opportuntities to lecture on the subject. 
Many of the most zealous and intelligent 
antisecret workers Michigan has ever 
had, were Wesleyan Methodist ministers. 

At the close of the camp meeting I 
went to Grand Rapids, to arrange for the 
coming convention to be held there Oc- 
tober 7th and 8th. 

On the next Sunday I spoke for the 
United Brethren at Salem church in the 
morning, and at Star church in the even- 
ing. Considerable interest was mani- 
fested at both places, with invitations to 
return. 

On September 2d, I spoke on "Oaths 
and Vows" in the Zutphen Christian Re- 
formed church. The house was nearly 
filled with young people, who manifested 
much interest. 

On the next Sabbath I spoke again for 
the United Brethren at Salem. Here 
was manifested quite a little anxiety, on 
the part of some, to get antisecret litera- 
ture, so I distributed quite a number of 
tracts. 

I returned again to Grand Rapids, to 
look after the interests of the Associa- 
tion, and found the brethren greatly en- 
couraged at the prospects of success of 
the coming convention. 

On the 10th I went to Holland, to meet 
Brothers Brink and Merrill and make the 
final arrangements of the programme 
for the convention. A splendid pro- 
gramme was arranged, and the State of- 
ficers are expecting great success. 

My next place of business was Kala- 
mazoo. Some of the Cynosure's friends 
were away, but every old subscriber re- 
newed, and some new subscribers were 
added to the list. 

Sunday, September 13th, found me at 
Cedar Creek United Brethren church. 
Here I gave two addresses. The latter 
meeting was three or four times as 
largely attended as the first. It was great- 
ly appreciated, and the State Lecturer 
was asked to come again. Some old sub- 
scriptions were renewed, and a new one 
gotten. Many tracts were distributed 
here. 

On the 14th I returned again to Grand 
Rapids to attend the Convocation of 



October. 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



179 



Prayer. I have found that nearly all, if 
not indeed all, of those attending this 
Convocation, were strictly opposed to se- 
cret societies. Brother S. B. Shaw, the 
leader, asked the people to pray for the 
antisecrecy work and the coming State 
convention. Some did pray for it very 
earnestly. 

September 16th I preached to the Con- 
vocation on prayer. The next day I, with 
others, spoke to men in a factory near-by, 
at the noon hour. The Lord blessed both 
services. 

On the 1 6th I gave an address in the 
East Street Christian Reformed church, 
to a congregation mostly of young peo- 
ple. 

Still the work moves on. It would 
move still faster with more faith, pray- 
ers, effort and money back of it. Let all 
Christians pray for it. 

Yours for truth and justice, 

G. A. Pegram. 



Pikeville, Ky., Sept. 4, 1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips : 

I am still in the fight for the right. I 
find that I can preacbr against tobacco, 
whisky, adultery, murder, and every 
other sin except the lodge, and nothing 
else stirs the devil like opposing the se- 
cret lodge sin. Surely this must be the 
antichrist that is to come. 

We are still looking for a great victory 
here in Jesus' name. One lodge has al- 
ready gone down, and I have heard that 
the charter of the Independent Order of 
Red Men has been called in. The lodge 
kingdom has been shaken. One man said 
he wanted to- go to the Legislature to se- 
cure a law to prohibit the use of any 
kind of lodge literature by any one ex- 
cept a lodge-member. The lodge people 
are sending in their lecturers here, hold- 
ing special meetings and making a great 
fight. But God is uncovering their sin, 
and several are getting disgusted with 
the lodge way. One of these lecturers 
for the lodge — Joe Monday — held sev- 
eral meetings here some weeks ago. He 
drew a large crowd of lodgemen, and in 
his talk he denounced people who were 
condemning the Lodge. The collection 
that was taken up for him amounted to 
about a hundred dollars. He left on the 



train, but when he got to Ashland he was 
seen already drunk. 

I have been very busy for the last 
three weeks in our Circuit Court, but 
have had a chance to meet a great many 
people and have distributed your tracts 
and books. Praise God for an institu- 
tion like the National Christian Associa- 
tion, which I believe is doing the great- 
est work on the earth to-day in tearing 
down the strongholds of Satan. I want 
to do all I can for my Master. I have 
perfect love that casts out all fear. Pray 
for me, that I may let God have His way 
with me. a. D. Cline. 



Bakersfield, Cal., Sept. 8, 1908. 
We want you to know that we are still 
your co-workers in the cause of the Mas- 
ter, and are uncovering evil in the vine- 
yard in which His providence has placed 
us. We are doing our best to help Chris- 
tians to see the awful error of secret so- 
cieties. In giving out the tract, "The 
Worship of Secret Societies Offered to 
Satan," some questioned my right of do- 
ing it. Others seemed to want the light 
it brought, but the tract created quite a 
commotion. It is sad beyond description 
to see the way Masonry is getting the 
church in its coils. Here in our small 
city, two Methodist preachers that I have 
remonstrated with, time and again, have 
joined the Masons. The dear Lord give 
them repentance to the acknowledging of 
the truth, that they may recover them- 
selves out of the snare of the devil, by 
whom they seem to be taken captive at 
his will. 

Wm. H. Henderson and Wife, 

Evangelists. 



FROM W. B. STODDARD. 

Leonardsburg, Ohio, Sept. 17, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure : I am here in the land 
where there is milk and honey, where the 
children of Israel Potter dwell. Some 
of the people say, "O my, how dry !" — 
figuratively speaking, 'most as dry as a 
lodge prayer. Prayers without Christ 
amount to nothing, while dry weather 
does help to ripen the corn. I am at the 
home of Rev. H. R. Smith, father of our 
former Ohio State Agent. I hear good 
reports of "Richey" (as he is called;. 



180 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



He has married the best girl he couid 
find, and is settling down as a professor 
in the Wesleyan Seminary at Houghton, 
N. Y. 

I found the Camp-meeting at Cleona, 
Pa., what was expected — an occasion of 
spiritual uplift. There was nothing un- 
usual. The zeal and fervor of spirit was 
marked, concluding with much song and 
shouting. On such occasions there is, of 
course, much rejoicing. Your Agent was 
given his liberty and found opportunity 
to remind the people of his mission. My 
entertainment was kindly provided by 
those in charge. 

Running to New York City, and Pas- 
saic, N. J., I made arrangement, in part, 
for the State gathering which is to be 
held, the Lord willing, the 19th and 20th 
of October. (See the President's call in 
October Cynosure.) The invitation of 
Domine A. J. Van den Heuvel, on the 
part of his people, was most cordial. I 
will undoubtedly lie able to report a most 
successful meeting, in my next month's 
letter. Let all the friends living nearby 
be on hand to aid in making this gather- 
ing count for the right. It is. probable 
that my father, Rev. James P. Stoddard, 
with his years of rich experience, will be 
with us. Those who know him best will 
want to hear the message he will have 
for us. 

A brief visit to Boston and Northfield, 
Mass., gave opportunity to secure a few 
Cynosure subscriptions and learn some- 
thing of the progress of the eastern work. 
God is blessing the seed being sown and 
there are many evidences of fruit to His 
glory. I spent Sabbath, August 23d, in 
New York City. In the morning I wor- 
shiped with Covenanter friends in Dr. 
Sommerville's church and heard a very 
helpful message. I had visited two other 
churches and found them closed while 
pastors were on vacation. In the after- 
noon I found two meetings in connection 
with the Missionary Alliance, where I 
could give testimony. Attention was 
called to the difference between the al- 
liance of David and Jonathan and that of 
the Oddfellows, in which lodge it is pro- 
fessedly represented. 

Death comes at any time, and often 
changes our plans. It was the death of 



our brother and helper, D. H. Harring- 
ton, of Columbus, that brought me to 
Ohio at this time. The funeral gave evi- 
dence of the high esteem in which he was 
held by those who knew him best. (See 
obituary notice.) It was the writer's priv- 
ilege to speak of his life as a Christian 
and a reformer. 

At Dayton, Ohio, I happened to call on 
Prof. L. R. Riedel, of the German Lu- 
theran school, as he had the children all 
together, drilling them for an entertain- 
ment. In response to his invitation I 
spoke of my home, Washington City, 
and of my work. The children gave the 
best of attention and evidently thought 
it very foolish and sinful for people to 
play they were "Elks," "Monkeys," etc., 
when they should be Christian men and 
women. I regard it a great privilege to 
make impressions on the children's minds. 
They are likely to be lasting. 

At Georgetown, Ohio, Rev. H. F. 
Beck made me very welcome, and with 
his good wife did much for my comfort. 

Last Sabbath I spoke twice to good au- 
diences in the Phillipsburg (Ohio) 
church of the Mennonite Brethren in 
Christ. Pastor Zell, of the Ohio Luther- 
an Synod, with some of his people, were 
present at the evening service, and he 
assured me his church would be open for 
a lecture when I could visit them. There 
was a rather amusing incident at the 
close of the meeting. A Mason came 
forward and asked to see the Masonic 
book from which I read (Mackey's "Rit- 
ualist"). After looking at it a little he 
remarked, "That is not correct; that is 
not the way I was initiated." "Oh," I 
replied, "this does not profess to give the 
ritual but just shows what the lodge 
teaches." I said, "You remember, when 
they blindfolded you, put the cable-tow 
about your neck, and took off part of 
your clothes, they asked you this ques- 
tion" — (which I read from the "Ritual- 
ist"). He evidently remembered, for he 
grew very red in the face and made for 
the door, while those who were listening 
had a good laugh. 

I found at Springfield, West Milton, 
and Trenton, Ohio, churches that expect 
to arrange for me to lecture early in No- 
vember. I plan to help the Indiana 



October, 190S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



1S1 



•friends in November, should they desire. 
I work east from here, hoping to get in 
work needed in western Pennsylvania, 
Baltimore, Md., and Washington, D. C 
before the month closes. Lectures are 
to be given, D. V., in Brooklyn, N. Y., 
October 6th, and at West Sayville, N. Y., 
October 7th. It looks as if I should have 
all I can attend to, as usual. 

W. B. Stoddard. 



THE CALL 

For the New York=New Jersey Conven- 
tion. 

The New York-New Jersey Christian 
Association will hold its Annual Conven- 
tion in the North Christian Reformed 
Church, Passaic, New Jersey, the Rev. 
A. J. Van den Heuvel, pastor, on Mon- 
day and Tuesday, October 19th and 20th, 
1908. 

There will be five sessions : Monday 
afternoon and evening; and on Tuesday, 
morning, afternoon, and evening. 

Secretary, Rev. W. B. Stoddard, will 
be on the field from October first, pre- 
paring the way for the convention. All 
who wish programs for announcement 
and distribution, will be gladly supplied 
on dropping card to Mr. Stoddard at 
Passaic, N. J., care of Rev. A. J. Van 
den Heuvel. 

We believe the lodge system to be un- 
scriptural and wrong. It is a wrecker 
of homes and of moralitv. It robs the 
house of God of men and causes them to 
use money, which should have gone to 
religious work, for lodges, rum and rev- 
elry. The whole lodge-system is dishon- 
oring to God and ruinous to souls. 

The call to meet in convention to con- 
sider this great and spreading evil, and 
the scriptural argument and testimony to 
overcome it, should wax so loud that the 
North Christian Reformed Church, Pas- 
saic, N. J., will be packed at every ses- 
sion. F. M. Foster, President. 



RESOLUTIONS ON MORAL REFORM 

Passed by the United Brethren in 
Christ (old constitution) in conference, 
near Friend, Nebraska, August 15, 1908: 

Resolved, That we stand loyal to our 
reform principles, and we rejoice to 
know that those God-given principles are 
growing in favor with good men every- 



where. It is not necessary to be a proph- 
et to see the evils of secret societies. 
Those organizations are religious, but 
not Christian, deceiving many with a 
counterfeit salvation. To oppose them, 
in the spirit of Christ, is duty. 

CYRUS SMITH, Secretary. 

AGENT DAVIDSON'S REPORT. 

Mounds, Illinois, Sept. 10, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure: I am here attending 
the Mount Olive Baptist. Association. 
. We are having a large delegation and a 
good meeting. 

Revs. S. S. Oliver, F. Robinson,- and 
Dr. J. H. Fulton each preached able ser- 
mons in which secret societies received a 
blow. I distributed a large assortment of 
tracts and spoke once against secrecy. I 
secured a great number of Cynosure 
subscribers.. 

The following Resolution was read 
and adopted : "Resolved, That we regard 
the Christian Church as the only divine- 
ly instituted society among men which 
has a divine authority for using the Bible 
with religious rites and ceremonies, and 
all other societies using the Bible and re- 
ligious ceremonies are unauthorized by 
the^Word of God; we regard them as 
anti-Christ, frauds, and corrupters; 
therefore we call upon our ministers and 
Christians everywhere to renounce se- 
cret societies and turn to the church of 
the New Testament and obev the Word 
of God by 'coming out from among them 
and being^separate.' (II. Corinthians 6; 
14-18.) Secret societies are sapping the 
spiritual life out of the Church and set- 
ting up strange altars. We urge our 
churches to establish poor saints' treas- 
uries in every church, and take care of 
our widows, orphans, minister to the 
sick, bury the dead, furnish nurses when 
necessary, as did the early churches in 
Jerusalem, Ephesus, Philippi, and other 
apostolic churches." 

Mound^City, Sept. 12.— By invitation 
of Rev. C. IT. Houghes I came here. I 
preached to an appreciative congregation, 
received several new subscriptions for the 
Cynosure, and distributed some antise- 
crecy literature. The Cynosure is doi 
a silent but very effective work here. 
God's truth is a power and must prevail 
wherever it is sown. A few lode-emen 



182 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



at the Mount Olive Association opposed 
my resolutions on technical grounds, but 
they did not come out boldly in defense 
of secret lodges, except one, Rev. C. W. 
Redd, pastor of the C. M. E. church, who 
said many good things but wound up by 
advocating a secret order exclusively for 
all respectable negroes and the enact- 
ment of a law by the State Legislature, 
approved by the United States Congress, 
to relegate all negroes to second-class 
cars on the railroads, who do not wear 
a badge of that fraternity. Such an idea, 
at a glance by the thoughtful Christian, 
at once becomes too ridiculous to even 
consider. God has ordained that a pure 
home is the sure foundation upon which 
pure society can safely build. A pure 
home is the dwelling place for the pres- 
ence of God, where His Word is su- 
preme. No other foundation can stand. 
The thing to do is to take God at His 
word and let nothing impure enter the 
home. 

Metropolis, 111., Sept. 14. — From 
Mound City I came here, as per previous 
arrangements. I addressed the Sunday- 
school at 10:30 a. m. At night I preach- 
ed to a large and appreciative audience 
at the First African Baptist church. My 
hope was to go from here to the great 
National Baptist Convention at Lexing- 
ton, Ky., but I am sure now it will be im- 
possible for me to go. The Cynosure is 
doing a silent but very effective work 
here. Some of the lodge element are 
rampant and breathing out threatenings, 
but I think they will simmer down as 
they read the Cynosure and think over 
their errors. On Monday I paid a visit- 
to the public school, which is a commo- 
dious, well-furnished, one-story, brick 
building, with all necessary modern con- 
veniences. Prof. A. H. Jones, A. B., a 
graduate of Wilberforce University of 
Ohio, is principal. He cordially received 
me and had me visit each room, and 
kindly invited me to address the stu- 
dents. Prof. Jones is a very accomplish- 
ed young Christian gentleman. He has 
been principal here three years. While 
secrecy is strong here, yet a great many, 
even of the lodge-people, seem to be 
willing to hear the truth, while others 
are opposed to hearing anything against 
secrecy. F. J. Davidson. 



FROM NEW ENGLAND'S SECRETARY. 

Secretary James P. Stoddard reports 
the circulation of about 2,000 tracts at 
the Students' Conference in Northfield. 
Let us hope that this will be a fruitful 
seed sowing. He was a delegate to the 
convention at Columbus which nominated 
Prohibition candidates for the presiden- 
tial campaign, and wrote in Home Light 
a few things that the Cynosure is glad 
to borrow : 

Having been officially commissioned 
among the delegates from Massachu- 
setts, wrote Mr. Stoddard, I felt it my 
first business to be in my seat at every 
session and attend strictly to the busi- 
ness of the convention. There was ample 
time and opportunity for personal inter- 
views and distribution of tracts during 
the recesses, which I improved without 
let or hindrance. 

It is presumable that there were some 
among the delegates who were affiliated 
with secret orders, but they were not 
conspicuously advertised by their sym- 
bols and badges. I saw only a single 
Masonic emblem and three Oddfellows' 
pins on exhibition, which was in strik- 
ing contrast with what I have found at 
some large political gatherings in former 
times. To me it is very significant as in- 
dicating the ''handwriting on the wall" 
of the approaching doom of this 20th 
century Babylon. 

It is probably due to the fact that these 
men had gathered for an honorable, pa- 
triotic and holy purpose, and therefore 
had no occasion to apologize for or to 
conceal their acts. They were not men 
who loved darkness rather than light be- 
cause their deeds were evil, which doubt- 
less accounts for the absence of those 
symbols of darkness so conspicuous upon 
those who hate the light. 

No one objected to my work or at- 
tempted a defense of the secret orders, 
while several admitted that they were an 
element of discord and danger in the 
country and that they ought to be sup- 
pressed by law. My room-mate from 
West Virginia was a Freemason and 
fought under the Confederate flag until 
Gen. Lee surrendered, yet he displayed 
no badges and had no word of commen- 
dation or apology for the lodge or the 
Rebellion. 






October, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



183 



While on the train passing out tracts, 
I was especially attracted by the intelli- 
gent appearance of an elderly couple. 
Handing a tract to the gentleman I 
paused for a single remark, to which he 
responded so heartily that I lingered for 
a very pleasant chat. His demeanor was 
that of a refined Christian gentleman, 
and I learned on further acquaintance 
that his home was in Pennsylvania and 
his vocation that of a minister in the 
Methodist Episcopal connection and a 
professor in one of their literary institu- 
tions. He was very frank and genial in 
his manner and I was a trifle surprised 
when he volunteered the statement, "I 
joined the Masons when I was a young 
man but was disgusted by their silly per- 
formances and lost all the interest I ever 
had in the order very soon. Since that 
time I have seen so much of their med- 
dling in civil and ecclesiastical affairs 
that I abominate the institution. I have 
known ministers who by their Masonic 
friends have secured appointments and 
positions for which they were totally un- 
fit and of which they were utterly unwor- 
thy. I am glad to know that something 
is being done to counteract this great 
evil, and I bid you Godspeed in your 
work." The professor's wife, who' had 
listened with marked interest, added her 
hearty amen. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Dermott, Ark., Sept. 15, 1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips: 

I am still at this place. Last Sunday I 
visited the First Baptist church. Rev. I. 
G. Bailey is the pastor of this church and 
the Moderator of the Southeast Dis- 
trict. He is a preacher of righteousness. 
lie can preach a whole gospel. He used 
to be an Oddfellow but has long since 
given up the lodge. He said the lodges 
are something to hide behind. One can 
do any kind of devilment and be protect- 
ed by them. He said when he was ini- 
tiated in the lodge he thought it was a 
Christian organization, but he soon found 
that they rejected the name of Jesus. One 
of his deacons told him the lodge was 
better than the church. Rev. Bailey said 
that was too much for him ; he must take 
a stand for the church. He stayed in the 
lodge only a little while longer. Just 



before he quit, one of the brothers of the 
lodge died — an old, hardened sinner. He 
said the lodge brothers had the lodge 
ceremony over the dead gambler first, 
and they said he was gone to the grand 
lodge above. After they got through 
they turned the dead man over to Rev. 
Bailey to preach his funeral. He said 
he was so disgusted with the thing that 
he said, "Cover him up ; I don't want to 
say anything." So they covered him up. 
Rev. Bailey quit the lodge that day. 

To go on to tell you about my visit to 
Elder Bailey's church: I met the people 
in the Sunday-school and taught the ad- 
vanced class. I had a chance to speak 
of the sin of the people of Israel in choos- 
ing a man to rule over them rather than 
God. Samuel told the people what kind 
of a king Saul would be (I. Samuel 8: 
10-18). Then -we saw in that lesson how 
men rule without God to direct their 
steps. I showed them how men are 
caught in the same trap to-day by fol- 
lowing wicked rulers who will not listen 
to God's true ministers. I asked the 
class, "Can any one of you tell me of any 
idolatrous worship that is among our 
people to-day, where men are letting oth- 
ers lead them away from God?" The 
class said, "Yes; the secret societies are 
the same as idol gods." I said, "Well 
said; and the rulers of these lodges are 
doing the same thing that wicked Saul 
did. People to-day have given up their 
sons and daughters and wives and little 
children to these secret societies ; and the 
secret societies are giving dances and all 
kinds of wine parties, teaching their 
children to stay out late at night, ruining 
their boys with strong drink, ruining 
their beautiful daughters in the round 
dance, lying on men's bosoms and danc- 
ing till three o'clock in the morning. Yet 
we are like the people that wanted a 
king" (I. Samuel 8: 19). 

After Sunday-school we stayed at the 
church till the baptizing was over. We 
sat and talked over the same subject — the 
lodges— till the afternoon service. Three 
or four brothers came to me and asked 
me a good many questions about lodges. 
I showed them the sin of the lodge oaths. 
While we were talking, one man, who 
had been an Oddfellow, said, "Brothers, 
that sister has told the truth. I used to 



184 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



be an Oddfellow. One day I heard a 
man say that he wanted to kill another 
man that he was angry with, and that 
he was going to kill him if it was the last 
act of his life. Some one said, 'If yon 
kill him, you will be hung.' He said, 'No, 
I won't; I am going to join the order, to 
get protection.' So he did join the Odd- 
fellows, and in six months he killed that 
man and the lodge got him out of the 
way of the law." So this brother said 
he quit them at once. I thought to my- 
self, "Lord, you will yet bring your peo- 
ple out of this murderous idolatry." 

The preachers who have come to the 
knowledge of the sin of the secret socie- 
ties, and then stay in them, will soon have 
to quit preaching, for the people are 
reading the Bible and are finding that 
they are false leaders and only care for 
the few dollars they get for preaching an- 
nual sermons and to be paid for their in- 
fluence to get their church-members to 
join in with the world, while the souls of 
men are dying. And woe to the leading 
women who are carrying the people away 
from God (Ezekiel 13: 18-23). 

Pray for mc. I will be up at Pastoria, 
Arkansas, next week, at the Central Dis- 
trict Association, if the Lord wills, to 
scatter tracts. God bless you. Yours for 
Christ's service, 

(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



From a private letter from Florida we 
copy the following: "I know this book 
(Standard Freemasonry Illustrated, Blue 
Lodge work) to be a real revelation of 
Masonry. I am an expelled Mason my- 
self, and now can serve God without a 
rival. Praise Him for ever and ever !" 



"One reason that a prophet is without 
honor in his own country, is, that after 
he starts off, they all want to be 
prophets." 



"Tact and deceit are always touching 
fingers delicately, but should be careful 
not to clasp hands." 



"People are not always entitled to so 
very much credit for their self-control ; 
there being in some cases very little to 
control." 



CONTRIBUTIONS. 

J. E. P., Washington, $5.00. 
A. D. C, Kentucky, $9.30. 
Mrs.. M. P. S., Ohio, $5.00. 
Rev. J. W. B., Ohio, $1.00. 
Mrs. W. S. O, Illinois, $5.00. 
Wra. L. B., Indiana, $5.00. 
Rev. W. G. W., Ohio, $2.00. 
Rev. W. F. H. H., Ohio, 36c. 
Rev. W. S. P., Michigan, 50c. 
G. W. S., California, $2.00. 
F. A. W., Illinois, $10.00. 

D. B., Arkansas, $2.50. 

Mrs. J. E. D. E., New York, $25.00. 

Rev. M. H. L., Illinois, $2.00. 

L. P., Pennsvlvania, $3.00. 

J. A. M., Illinois, $5.00. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. D., Ohio, $1.00. 

A. H., Illinois, $4.00. 

E. B., California, $6.00. 
Mrs. E. W., Illinois, $5.00. 
Mrs. E. W. Illinois, $5.00. 
Rev. Wm. H., Nebraska, $2.00. 

F. & G. N., Ohio, $10.00. 
R. M. S., Arkansas, $1.00. 
Miss M. S. C, Kansas, $5.00. 
J. A. C, Connecticut, $5.00. 

S. M., South Dakota, $1.00. 

G. B., Iowa, $3.00. 

Mrs. N. E. K., Illinois, $5.00. 

Miss E. F., Illinois, $1.00. 

A. J. L., Iowa, $2.50. 

Rev. G. L. C, California, $1.00. 

J. B., Illinois, $5.00. 

C. E. M., New Hampshire, $2.00. 

Mrs. E. M. G., Pennsylvania, S3.00. 

Mrs. C. C. S* Ohio, $5.00. 

Dr. N. S. do C, Brazil, $5.00. 

Mrs. H. W., Illinois, $1.00. 

J. C. B., Pennsylvania, $3.00. 

Mrs. A. R., Indiana, $3.00. 

T. P. K., Illinois, $5.00. 

Mrs. J. A. R., Michigan, $1.00. 

Rev. L. G. A., Minnesota, $1.00. 

Christian Reformed Church, South 
Olive, Michigan, $5.00. 

First Christian Reformed Church, En- 
glewood, Illinois, $20.95. 

First Christian Reformed Church, Chi- 
cago, $27.96. 

Christian Reformed Church, Gales- 
burg, Iowa, $3.50. 

Philo C. Hildreth, Trustee, $23.69. 

Estate, Mrs. Lydia C. Andrews, 
$126.82. 



October, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



185 



Collection at Annual Meeting, $48.54. 

Since May 1st, contributions have been 
received from seventeen States : Wash- 
ington, Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana, Mich- 
igan, Illinois, Minnesota, California, 
Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, South Dakota, 
Arkansas, New York, Pennsylvania, Con- 
necticut and New Hampshire. Is your 
State represented? If not, will you see 
that it is in the next list? You can un- 
derstand, from the amount received, that 
it is impossible to give much financial aid 
to our State Agents or grant much free 
literature. Please read prayerfully the 
item, in this number, headed "Our Im- 
perative Needs." 

The Cynosure bears evidence, espe- 
cially in the "News of Our Work," that 
a more vigorous campaign is being 
waged than one would expect from the 
interest shown by the amount of contri- 
butions. Let us do better, and see to it 
that some light, small or great, shines in 
every State of the Union. Let it stir us, 
that $10.00 for the work in the United 
States, since January 1st, has come from 
Brazil, South America. 



A CLUSTER OF CARLETON EPIGRAMS. 

In the new book, entitled "A Thou- 
sand Thoughts," we have some of the 
latest coinages from Will Carleton's 
luminous and ever-active brain. They 
are all thoroughly Carletonian in char- 
acter, and full of that vivid imagin- 
ation and terse common sense that have 
made his poems famous all over the 
civilized world. 

These "A Thousand Thoughts" are not 
in rhyme, as is much of our author's 
work; they may really be called "Poet- 
ical Prose." They contain short and 
pithy sayings on all sorts of subjects 
that would naturally interest the human 
mind. There is a carefully prepared in- 
dex, which enables the reader to find 
quickly what is said upon any particu- 
lar subject. This enables one to use the 
book in the way of stimulus of thought, 
for use in conversation, letter-writing, or 
literary work; and the book is enter- 
taining to read as a whole. 

It is sent anywhere by mail for fifty 
cents, by the Every Where Publishing- 
Company, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



torn §m JMatL 



A pastor of the M. E. Church in Min- 
nesota writes, under date of August 
5th : "A friend has recently sent me a 
copy of the Christian Cynosure, 
which I have been delighted to read. I 
was inveigled into the Woodmen lodge 
about three years ago, but after a very 
few months was so distressed by what 
I saw, and the company into which it 
took me, that perforce, 'to save my soul 
alive,' I had to withdraw from fellowship 
which can only be compared to that of 
the evil works of darkness." 



Mr. George W. Shealey, Whittier, 
California, writes on July 14th: ''Al- 
though our Cause moves slowly, still, 
thank God, it moves! Never did Chris- 
tian soldiers fight so hard a battle. The 
very people who ought to stand most 
valiantly for a clean church and righte- 
ous government, are our bitter ene- 
mies. I think I see clear evidences 
of a great awakening. Wish I could 
take the field, but I am laid up with 
rheumatism, and can only watch and 
pray. The Lord bless you and all the 
faithful brethren — workers and read- 
ers." ' 



"LET HIM HEAR." 

Dear Friends — If you believe secret 
societies to be anti-Christ, ask God, our 
Heavenly Father, to give you the con rag* 
of your convictions, for Jesus' sake. 

It is very mysterious why a man or 
a woman who is saved and willing to be 
used in helping to bring in the Kingdom 
of God, should fear them which kill the 
body. 

It is still more wonderful how com- 
pletely God removes that fear when once 
we come out boldly upon His side ; how 
He gives grace to the humble so that 
they may bear witness to His truth, and 
He even puts words in their mouths — 
"tjie sword of the Spirit." 

I cannot express my appreciation of 
the Christian Cynosure and the Na- 
tional Christian Association. 

Marie Murray, 
Albion, Neb. 



186 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



FROM EVANGELIST WOLFE. 

Portland, Ore., July 14, 1908. 
My Dear Brother Phillips: 

Your note came to me here, where 
I have been for over a week, having been 
sent out here to get some health 
back. For months I have been a suffer- 
er from rheumatic troubles, and from 
the effects of the old sunstroke received 
some four years ago in the Indian Ter- 
ritory. I have passed through much 
since I last wrote you ; yet still the Lord 
has been so merciful and kind to such 
an one as myself. Blessed be His name 
forever. 

I am stopping with my married daugh- 
ter now, and shall remain on the coast 
until He calls me home, I suppose, for 
if my family can remove by the coming 
fall, they will meet me here. 

The old enemy of secretism yet fol- 
lows me — a sort of Nemesis of devilish 
hate. But thank God "the rider and his 
host will soon be swallowed up in the 
sea," and we shall triumph gloriously. 
It is only for a little while and we shall 
see him no more. I shall always wit- 
ness against this evil of the pit — secret- 
ism. How can any man conscientiously 
keep his mouth closed when this thing 
is eating the very heart out of the church 
of Christ? I cannot be a "dumb dog." 

Write me occasionally. The old vet- 
erans should not be forgotten. Some 
months ago I heard from dear Conant, 
but he was very feeble, he informed me. 
Let us be faithful unto death, and then 
the crown of life. Hallelujah. 

Yours in the Old Faith, 

J. E. Wolfe. 

1804 Foster street, Portland, Oregon. 



SEVENTY=EIGHT YEARS OLD. 

Only those who are publishing in an 
unpopular reform know the pleasure that 
is given by kind recognition from those 
who are life subscribers. Any way, it is 
a real pleasure to the publisher of the 
Cynosure to receive the renewal of such 
a subscriber as Rev. A. Mayn, of Sals- 
berry, Greene County, Indiana, who is 
now in his seventy-ninth year, and writes 
under date of September 10th: "I could 
not do without the Cynosure." The dol- 
lar is very acceptable, as well as need- 
ed. 



from ©ttr fa-chatty 



SPANKING CURE FOR "FRAT" EVIL. 

Chicago School Board's Head and Supt. 

Cooley Comment on "Boys' Inso= 

lence" at Conference. 

Otto C. Schneider, president of the 
board of education, believes that if cor- 
poral punishment were restored in the 
Chicago high schools the much discussed 
"frat evil" would disappear in just about 
the proverbial number of shakes of a 
lamb's tail. 




"Since our conference with those boys 
and girls yesterday afternoon I have be- 
come pretty clear as to what they need," 
he said, "the boys, I mean. If they could 
be taken out behind the school building 
and given a good old-fashioned spanking 
it would do more real good than all the 
rules the board can pass. 

No Law Against It. 

"O, yes; we could do it. The Illinois 
state law does not forbid corporal pun- 
ishment. It would simply be a matter 
of annulling our own rule against it. I 
don't say that I am going to advocate 
any such measure, but I am convinced 
that it would be a good thing. 



October, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



187 



"The conduct of the boys who attend- 
ed that conference showed exactly why 
we are stamping out the fraternities. 
They were impudent and ill mannered. 
When we went into the committee room 
it was a general rush for seats and it was 
almost impossible for Supt. Cooley and 
me to find chairs. When we gave them 
an opportunity to state their case they 
were impudent and cocky. I never saw 
such an exhibition of demoralization in 
youngsters in my life." 

Supt. Cooley did not advocate the cor- 
poral punishment remedy, but he was 
even more emphatic than the president in 
commenting on the boys' conduct. 

"There was enough evidence right on 
the floor of that committee room to con- 
vict every high school fraternity in Chi- 
cago," he said. "They were not only 
impudent — they were insolent." 

Sign Pledges Under Protest. 

So far as the "frat fight" is concern- 
ed, the day brought a grateful lull in the 
hostilities. At the Hyde Park High 
school the pledges of the recalcitrants 
were accepted, signed "under protest," 
and all returned to their classes with the 
exception of Edward McDonald, the Phi. 
Sigma member, who was selected as 
plaintiff in the test case in the Circuit 
court. 

As each pledge was presented, Princi- 
pal Loomis told the signer that the 
promise would be interpreted to mean 
that all connection with secret organi- 
zations had been abandoned except such 
connection as was necessary for prose- 
cuting their cases in the courts. No visi- 
ble evidence of identification with the so- 
cieties, such as the wearing of "frat" 
pins, will be tolerated. 

The same rules will be insisted on at 
the other high schools. So far as the 
various principals knew, all the secret 
society members signed the nledo-es and 
returned to their classes during the day. 
— Chicago Daily Tribune, Sept. 16, 1908. 



STRENUOUS INITIATION. 
Missouri Editor Demands Big Damages 
For Broken Ribs. 

Golden City, Mo., Aug. 24. — Alleging 
that four of his ribs were broken and that 
he was otherwise injured when he resist- 
ed efforts to "brand" him, John A. Grei- 



sel, editor of the Golden City Register, 
has brought suit against eight members 
of the Camp of Modern Woodmen of 
America here, asking $10,000 damages. 
The attack occurred, Mr. Greisel says in 
his petition, on April 10th, while he was 
taking the second degree in the Wood- 
men initiation ceremonies. 

FRATS GRILLED BY EDUCATOR. 

Members Said to Lose Modesty and Be» 

come Insincere Triflers — Gambling, 

Drinking and Smoking Learned 

in Chapter Houses. 

Chapter 'houses of high school fraternities 
in Chicago were pointed out yesterday as 
dens of viciousness in which gambling, drink- 
ing, smoking and profanity flourish, and 
orgies last until the small hours. High 
school and college instructors made the 
charges at a conference of parents and prin- 
cipals on the fraternity problem at the Chi- 
cago Normal School. 

The "frat" house was described as an "in- 
strument of the devil'' and a "plague spot," 
and the fraternity itself branded with a score 
or more of degenerating influences, mentally, 
morally and physically. 

Charles W. French, vice president of the 
Chicago Normal College, was strongest in his 
denunciation of the high school fraternity. 
He drew his conclusions from many years of 
experience as principal of the Hyde Park 
High School. Mr. French was unable to be 
present, but his paper was read by J. F. 
Hosic, head of the English department of the 
Normal school. 

Says Frats Destroy Character. 

"Surely, if there is anything that our 
schools should cherish and upbuild, it is man- 
ly and womanly character, pure, self-sacri- 
ficing, and aspiring to the highest things," 
said Mr. French. "Yet who that has seen 
the chapter house, open day and night, with 
its tobacco and profanity, and too often or- 
gies lasting into the small hours, can fail to 
see a vicious influence which tends to ruin 
those who participate, and just as certainly 
to spread its contagion through the body of 
the school, which cannot avoid moral de- 
terioration as long as it cherished such plague 
spots in its midst? 

"Not all chapter houses are as bad ae this, 
but some are worse, and so little of good 
and so much of evil flows from them that 
none can stand under the condemnation. 

"Evil as is their influence upon the school 
as an institution, their influence upon their 
individual members is more marked and more 



188. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



quickly eventuated .into a moral and intel- 
lectual decline, I have seen pure-minded, 
earnest and promising boys transformed in- 
to shallow, disreputable loafers, with their 
only hright promise gone and the morning 
of their lives hopelessly eclipsed. 

Girls Lose High Aspirations. 

"I have seen gentle, modest girls, with se- 
rious purposes and high aspirations, change, 
not only once or twice, but many times, info 
shallow and insincere triflers. Is it any 
wonder that I want to see this evil abated in 
the interests of humanity? 

"It is not. against the boys and girls who 
form these organizations that I raise my 
voice, for they and their interests are dear 
to me, but it is against this instrument of 
the devil which is corrupting them and ruin- 
ing their lives that I would exert my strong- 
est influence. 

"I might speak of the resulting diminish- 
ing influence of the teacher, the increasing 
familiarity of both boys and girls with things 
which they should not know, and which in 
all decency should be kept from them, the 
pertness and ill-breeding in public places, 
which would have brought the blush to the 
cheeks of the school children of a former 
generation, an increasing vulgarity of thought 
and conversation, the growth of the tobacco 
habit, and— but the sad list seems endless, 
and I refrain." 

Gambling in Chapter Houses . 
Spencer W. Smith, of the Wendell Phillips 
High School, the first of the speakers, de- 
clared that smoking, gambling and drinking 
— the latter not. so prevalent — were common 
practices in the "frat" house. 

"I know for a fact this is so," he said. *'I 
know of one young man who resigned from 
his fraternity, and he told me that six or 
seven men of his 'crowd' had learned to 
drink in the 'house' and were still at it. 
Euchre and casino become too tiresome, and 
poker follows naturally. 

"You may say your son does not play 
poker, but I say you don't know much what 
he is doing in the 'frat' house. They do play 
poker." 

Mr. Smith declared also that out of six 
high school fraternity boys from a certain 
school who entered the University of Chi- 
cago only one "made" a fraternity in the, 
university. This one boy, he said, was 
dropped from his fraternity at the end of 
the year. Four of the five others were 
dropped from school for cribbing. 
—Chicago Daily Tribune, Nov. 23, 1907. 

Read the address, on page 142, of 
Rev. Samuel H. Swartz and declare, if 
you can, wherein the lodges for adults 



are superior to school "Frats" for "cher- 
ishing and upbuilding manly and wo- 
manly character — pure, self-sacrificing 
and aspiring to the highest things." 

WHY NOT COLLEGES? 

An editorial note in Young People, July 
25, said : "In this issue appears the third 
article on 'School Fraternities' — the 
pros and cons of which have roused such 
intense interest in many quarters. 
Though there are, of course, two sides 
to every question, it would appear that 
the balance of evil is largely on the side 
of the fraternities. The argument and 
facts advanced by 'Geilest' seem to ad- 
mit of little exception." 

The second article opened with the 
questions : Why are the school authori- 
ties opposed to the sororities and fratern- 
ities among the boys and girls of the high 
schools ? In what way do they differ 
from the fraternities in colleges and uni- 
versities? 

It treated the first question, alleging, 
for one thing-, the creation of an unwhole- 
some social atmosphere. Disturbances 
are caused in the school-room and the 
social order of the whole institution is 
demoralized. "Smokers," held in the 
fraternity rooms, promote smoking 
among young high-school boys. Cliques 
segregate themselves, and have a conceit 
of their superiority over fellow pupils. A 
special investigation in Chicago, reveal- 
ed such a horrible moral condition as 
could not be published. Some of the 
better children of the city, as socially 
ranked, were in these frightful condi- 
tions. Sororities and fraternities do 
not come from slums, for money is re- 
quired to belong to them and support 
their cost. 

The tendency of the fraternities is to 
set a pace in expense of education that 
is exclusive of the poorer pupils. The 
writer says : 

"It is a growing difficulty among people 
of moderate incomes as to the high-school 
education for their children. Unfortunately 
our school authorities have permitted a con- 
dition of things to grow until a poor boy or 
girl finds it impossible to go through the 
high school. The fraternities are not alone 
the cause of the trouble, although they have 
largely ministered to it. The necessity for 
fine clothes, the expenses of many social 



October. 190S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



189 



functions, the various social demands— all of 
which should be outside of our public-school 
system— have kept children from the high 
schools in many parts of our land." 

The third article continues to press the 
same objection by saying: 

"Not long ago President Eliot, of Har- 
vard, severely condemned the present public- 
school system, which sent so many children 
from the eighth grades into the world with- 
out the equipment that a high school should 
furnish every boy and girl in the land. He 
assigned, as a cause, the lack of enthusiasm 
for re;; 1 education in the lower grades. But 
whi>9 that may be true in a measure, there 
is nnother reason, already noted. The fra- 
ternities lie at the bottom of the whole trou- 
ble. They compel expenses which many par- 
ents cannot bear ; they create distinctions 
of a social sort that make schoollife humili- 
ating for boys and girls whose parents may 
not have much money. The writer is ac- 
quainted with a fine girl whose father took 
her from the high school for the only rea- 
son that he could not afford the social de- 
mauds which the sororities and fraternities 
naturally made upon his daughter. Rather 
than have her endure the social slights and 
other indignities, she left the school and 
never returned — her education was hindered 
through a condition of things that never 
should have been permitted to gain the slight- 
est foothold." 

The writer refers to President Wood- 
row Wilson's strong condemnation of the 
fraternity life of colleges and universi- 
ties. He quotes this prominent educator 
as pronouncing' this "the greatest peril to 
institutions of learning in the country." 

The writer welcomes protective legisla- 
tion, and more than hints at the folly of 
parents who take sides against educators 
of their children, saying: 

"It is a good sign of better things that 
the various States are legislating against this 
iniquity which has grown up among our boys 
and girls. xVbove all things, parents should 
know better than to take sides with their 
misguided children in opposing the deliberate 
judgment of educators all over the land. 
They know things of which we only imagine. 
If such a report as that of the Chicago inves- 
tigating committee cannot be published, the 
conclusion can be no other than that the fra- 
ternities and sororities are wholly un-Amer- 
ican in their spirit, immoral in their tend- 
ency, destructive of real educational ideals — 
the undermining of the finest system of boy 
and girl training the world has ever known." 



WEST POINT HAZERS. 

New York, July 23— Eight West Point 
cadets, two of them first classmen, have 
been found guilty of hazing by a board of 
officers appointed by Col. Hugh L. Scott, 
superintendent of the United States Mil- 
itary Academy, and their dismissal from 
the academy has been recommended to 
the Secretary of War. 

Cover Their Tracks Well. 

It can be said, however, that never in 
the history of West Point was evidence 
of hazing so carefully and so skillfully 
concealed from the authorities as it was 
in this particular case. Even the cadet 
officers were kept out of the secret, while 
as for the plebes, as the fourth classmen 
are called, they all took their medicine 
like men, and it took a month's question- 
ing to get any evidence of value out of 
them. 

Use Ants to Plague Plebes. 

Finally one day one of the witnesses 
said something about an ant and the 
board started to investigate the ant situ- 
ation at W'est Point. They learned that 
several large colonies of the little insects 
were camped at the point and that the 
new cadets knew more about ants than 
probably any other body of young men 
in the world. 

Finally the ant problem was solved and 
here is the solution. 

When a plebe violated the warning 
drum regulation and failed to "fall in" 
promptly he had to be punished. Plebe 
would be reported to one of the hazers 
as having violated the "fall in" regula- 
tion and, pleading guilty, the upper class 
men would say something like this to 
him : 

"Go out into G company street and 
pick up a hundred nice fat ants, put 
them in your cap, and in half an hour 
come back, count them, and i l" any are 
absent report accordingly. If all are 
present or accounted for put them in your 
locker until further orders." 

If an ant was absent the plebe would 
probably be ordered out to capture an- 
other fifty as an additional punishment. 
Made to Eat With Feet Up. 

Still another form of hazing was or- 
dered at meal time. This required the 
plebe when he sat down at the table to 
place the tips of his toes against the bot- 



190 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 190& 



torn of the table and eat in that almost 
impossible position until at a signal from 
one of his tormentors he was permitted 
to resume a natural attitude. 

One of the first classmen, it developed 
during the trial, had been more cruel 
than any of the others. This cadet, it ap- 
pears, compelled the plebes to care for 
his room, and when they did the menial 
service in such a way as to meet with his 
disapproval he struck them in the stom- 
ach. There is absolutely no chance of 
this cadet ever being reinstated, it was 
said by an officer at the Army and Navy 
Club to-night. 



PUBLICITY OR SECRECY. 

President Eliot of Harvard said in an 
address at Cincinnati : 

"The great evil in American governmental 
affairs, from Washington down to the small 
cities and towns, is secrecy. The trouble lies 
in the fact that, while there may be a sem- 
blance of publicity, the real determining ac- 
tion is made out of sight of the public." 

An editorial article in a daily paper, 
having quoted this, continued by saying 
in one of its paragraphs : 

"We are continually having impressive 
illustrations of this put before us, and are 
toeing made to realize that secrecy is the 
true basis for the worst evils that obtain 
in politics and business. It was secrecy that 
made possible the extraordinary practices in 
the conduct of the Metropolitan traction sys- 
tem, now being revealed by an investigation 
that is gradually disclosing the means by 
which a tremendously rich property was plun- 
dered. It was secrecy that made possible 
the gross abuses and extravagances laid bare 
in recent insurance investigations. The white 
light of publicity is a great cure for wrongs." 



LODGE MURDERS. 

Birmingham, Ala., Aug. 9, 1908. — 
Three men were instantly killed and 
seven injured, two of whom will prob- 
ably die, when striking miners fired into 
a passenger train on the Birmingham 
Mineral railroad at Blockton this morn- 
ing about 2 o'clock . 

THE DEAD. 

Conductor Joe T. Collins. 

O. S. Dent, deputy sherifT. 

Willard Howell, non-union miner. 

Among the injured are: Maj. F. H. 
Dodge, superintendent of safety, Tennes- 



see Coal Company, wounded in hand and 
leo" 

E. E. Cox, superintendent of mines, 
Tennessee Coal Company, wounded 
slightly in knee. 

The train was a special bearing non- 
union men to the Blockton mines under 
guard of soldiers and deputies. On the 
outskirts of the town the engineer sud- 
denly saw a log across the track and at 
once a fusillade was fired into the train. 
The engineer did not stop but let the 
pilot throw the log from the track and 
put on full speed. The place where the 
attack was made was in a cut. 

The assailants, from the rocks above, 
poured down a fire directly into the 
windows. Practically every window in 
the train was broken and shots struck all 
parts of the engine and cab. 



LODGE USES DYNAMITE. 

The new Lehigh Valley railroad 
bridge at Perry street, Buffalo, New 
York, was dynamited on the night of July 
1st. This is the twenty-first bridge con- 
structed by the McClintic-Marshall Con- 
struction Company of Pittsburg that has 
been blown up during the past few 
months. The crime of this company, 
from the lodge standpoint, is their em- 
ployment of non-union men. 



LODGE DESTROYS WHEAT. 

Ripley, O., June 15, 1908. — The night- 
riders of Brown county intend to trans- 
fer their fight from the tobacco beds to 
the wheat fields, according to reports 
current on the streets here. It is said on 
excellent authority that the Equity tobac- 
co men will not, if they can help it, allow 
any independent tobacco grower to 
thresh his wheat, which is now nearing 
maturity, nor will any farmer be allowed 
to employ in his wheat field any man who 
is not in sympathy with the Equity cause. 
If this threat is carried out it is not im- 
probable that soldiers will be kept here 
all summer. — Lancaster Daily Eagle. 



VICTIM OF BLACK HAND. 

New York, Aug. 13. — Ambushed in a 
lonely spot known as "Murderers' field" 
on the Lincoln road in the Flatbush sec- 
tion of Brooklyn, late last night, Pietro 
Barilla, a well-to-do hotel keeper of 



October, 1008. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



191 



Wood Haven, was attacked and killed by 
a number of men. 

From several letters found in the dead 
man's pockets it seems certain that Baril- 
la was a victim of a "black hand" plot. 



LODGE SLUGGING. 

William R. Robinson, a Canadian citi- 
zen, who declares that his life is in 
danger because he has refused to join 
Franklin Union No. 4, will have his 
grievance taken up by the state depart- 
ment at Washington if the plans of the 
British consular office in Chicago are 
carried out. 

Robinson, who is employed as a press- 
man by Poole Bros., declares that his life 
has been threatened repeatedly because 
he refused to join the union and pay in- 
itiatory dues of $57. 

According to Robinson, he was attack- 
ed one night by two pugilists who, he de- 
clares, were employed by the union and 
he escaped a severe beating only by taking 
refuge in a restaurant. He came to Chi- 
cago to escape the espionage of the union, 
but now says that his two assailants are 
also in the city and that they have threat- 
ened to "get" him unless he joins the 
labor organization. 

Life of Speyer in the Balance. 

The life of Wiert B. Speyer, 432 110th 
street, the dairyman who was slugged 
and shot Sunday morning in the rear of 
his home by three men believed by the po- 
lice to be members of the Milk Drivers' 
union, hangs in the balance and physi- 
cians are unable to express definite hope 
for his recovery. The course of the bul- 
let has been traced and found to have 
touched both lungs. Speyer has been un- 
able to give further details of the shoot- 
ing. 

Lieut. Mooney of the Kensington sta- 
tion, said to-day he was positive that the 
attack on Speyer was made by union 
men and he is urging every man in the 
precinct to redouble his efforts to trace 
the members of the "educational commit- 
tee." — Chicago Daily News, Aug. 18, 
1908. 



"Do not hire any one, unless you are 
willing to work hard to get your money 
back." 



Our Imperative Needs. 

THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
work demands an merits your financial support, at least 
to the extent named below. 

$700 for FREE LITERATURE FUND, in order to 
*P vv do as well as was done last year. 

<fc^OO for expenses of STATE AND NATIONAL 
*p*JKJ\J CONVENTIONS. 



$3 500 is needed f or 19u8-1909. There were eight on 
H*** j*****/ salaries for a longer or shorter period last year 

$9"^ OftO is what we ask for GENERAL ENDOW- 
«P£.0,UUU MENT FUND. There should be a 
larger General Endowment Fund, to insure continuous 
work in times of panic and "hard times," and especially 
for enlargement of the Work of the Association. Philo 
Carpenter and others thought it ought to be at least 
$3j,0 0. The present amount is $7,0u0. 



FORM OF BEQUEST. 

/ give, devise and bequeath unto the Na- 
tional Christian Association, a corporation 
created and existing under and by virtue of 
the laios of the State of Illinois, and having 
its principal office at 22.1 West Madison 

street, Chicago, Dollars, 

(or if lands, describe the same) to be applied 
to the uses and purposes of said Association, 
and under its direction. 



Well did ex-President James McCosh, 
LL. D., of Princeton University, say: 

"I have noticed that these who have 
been trained in secret societies, collegiate 
or political, and in trades unions, like 
priests, Jesuits, thugs and Molly Ma- 
guires, have their sense of right and 
wrong so perverted that in the interests 
of the body with which they have identi- 
fied themselves they will commit the 
most atrocious crimes, not only without 
compunction, but with an approving 
heart and with the plaudits of their as- 
sociates." — "Psychology ; the Motive 
Powers," page 214. 



Beware of desperate steps ; the dark- 
est day, lived till to-morrow, will have 
passed away. — Cozvpcr. 

The things that we strive for should be 
worthy of our striving. 



No man will ever reach heaven with 
his face toward the pit. 



The first man had his Eden prepared 
for him ; the rest of us must prepare it 
for ourselves as best we can. 



102 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



October, 1908. 



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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
Master of ^zliy Lodge, No. 191, Holland, Mich. 
Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
institution and a critical analysis of the character 
of each degree, by President J. Blanchr.rd, of 
Wheaton College. Monitorial quotations and many 
notes from standard Masonic authorities confirm 
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character of Masonic teaching and doctrine. The 
accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
O. Doesburg, Past Master Unity Lodge, No. 191, 
Holland, Mich., and others. This is the latest, 
most accurate and most complete ritual of Blue 
Lodge Masonry. Over one hundred illustrations 
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dates, signs, grips, etc. Complete work of 376 
pages, cloth, $1.00; paper cover, 60 cents. 

CHAPTER DEGREES. 

This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
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Master, Most Excellent Master and Royal Arch 
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Chapter of the United States of America. Com- 
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trations. It gives the correct method of con- 
ferring the degrees and the proper manner of 
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OTHER LODGE RITUALS 
AND SECRETS 

REVISED ODDFELLOWSHIP ILLUS- 
TRATED. 

The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
Encampment and Rebekah (ladies') degrees. By 
a Past Grand Patriarch. Profusely illustrated, 
and guaranteed to be strictly accurate, with a 
sketch of the origin, history and character of 
the order, over one hundred foot-note quotations 
from standard authorities, showing the character 
and teachings of the order, and an analysis of each 
degree by President J. Blanchard. This ritual 
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$1.50; paper cover, 75 cents. 

REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIx 
UAL. 

An exact copy of the new official ritual 
adopted by the Supreme Lodge of the World, with 
the secret work added and fully illustrated. Cloth, 
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MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
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Complete revised official ritual of the Bene- 
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ceremonies, odes and hymns. 35 cents. 

REVISED RED MEN RITUAL. 

The complete illustrated ritual of the Improved 
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paper, 35 cents. 



KNIGHT TEMPLARISM ILLUSTRATED. 

A full illustrated ritual of the six degrees 
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Templar and Knight of Malta. A book of 341 
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SCOTCH RITE MASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the Scottish Rite, 4th 
to 33rd degrees inclusive, by a Sovereign Grand 
■Commander. Profusely illustrated. The first 
chapter is devoted to an. historical sketch of the 
Rite by President J. Blanchard of Wheaton Col- 
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hundred accurate quotations from the highest 
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-object of these degrees and also afford incontro- 
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work is issued in two volumes and comprises 
1038 pages. Per set (2 vols.), cloth, $3.00. Per 
set, paper cover, $2.00. 

HANDBOOK OF FREEMASONRY. 

By Edmond Ronayne, Past Master of Key- 
stone Lodge, No. 639, Chicago. This book gives 
the correct or "standard" work and ritual of 
Blue Lodge Masonry, the proper position of each 
officer in the Lodge-room, order of opening and 
closing the lodge, method of conferring the de- 
grees of "Ancient Craft Masonry" — Entered Ap- 
prentice, Fellow-craft and Master Mason — the 
proper manner of conducting the business of the 
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MYSTIC SHRINE ILLUSTRATED. 

- A complete illustrated ritual of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine. This is a side Masonic 
degree^ conferred only on Knights Templar and 
on thirty-two degree Masons. Revised and en- 
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ECCE ORIENTI. 

The complete standard ritual of the first 
three Masonic degrees, in cypher, printed by a 
Masonic publishing house and used by many Wor- 
shipful Masters, all over the country, instructing 
candidates. Any one having Freemasonry Illus- 
trated can learn to read the cypher. Pocket size, 
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FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Work- 
ings of Freemasonry." By Ex-President Charles 
■G. Finney, of Oberlin College. President Finney 
was a "bright Mason," but left the lodge when 
he became a Christian. This book has opened 
the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 
£0 cents. 

OATHS AND PENALTIES OF 33 DEGREES 
OF FREEMASONRY. 

To get these thirty-three degrees of Masonic 
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oaths. 15 cents. 

ARE MASONIC OATHS BINDING ON THE 
INITIATE? 

By Rev. A. L. Post. Proof of the sinfulness 
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5 cents. 

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY A CHRISTIAN 
SHOULD NOT BE A FREEMASON. 

By Rev. Robert Armstrong. 16 pages ; 5 cents. 

MASONIC OUTRAGES. 

Compiled by Rev. H. H. Hinman, showing 
Masonic assault on lives of seceders, on reputation, 
and on free speech ; interference with justice in 
courts, etc. 20 cents. 



REVISED REBEKAH RITUAL, ILLUS. 
TRATED. 

Revised amended official "Ritual for Rebekah 
Lodges, published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge, 
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CHRISTIAN WORKERS' TRACTS 



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EXPERIENCE OP STEPHEN MERRITT, 

"THE EVANGELIST 

A 138-degree Mason. 7 pages ; postpaid, 2 
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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

By Col. George R. Clarke. A Thirty-two De- 
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TWO NIGHTS IN A LODGE ROOM. 

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BAPTL* T TESTIMONIES. 

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THE WORSHIP OF SECRET SOCIETIES 
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Address by President Blanchard at the An- 
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The Mother of Secret Societies not Jesuitism, 
but Masonry. The Governing Force is Masonry. 
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ODDFELLOWSHIP A RELIGIOUS INSTI- 
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WHY I LEFT THE REBEKAH LODGE. 

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CATECHISM OF ODDFELLOWSHIP. 

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WHY DO MEN REMAIN ODDFELLOWS? 

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THE "GOOD MAN " ARGUMENT. 

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ARE INSURANCE LODGES CHRISTIAN? 

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Sweet (Symosure 1 . 

far Fixed 
7n Spotless 
High lit The Regions 

•c*>OF THE «>• 

Polar Night, 

Thou Serv'st 
A WAYMARK 




In Beersh elm's lonely desert, 

''Neath the broom-tree's cooling shade ; 
Sat Jehovah's mighty prophet, 

Who the test with Baal made. 



This true man of faith and power, 
Highly honored by his God, 

One with us in human passions, — 
Knowing paths our feet have trod, — 

Asked to die, like all the fathers ; — 
By a direful threat made weak — 

Then an angel came and touched him, 
Taught him fuller life to seek. 



"Not accomplished yet thy mission, 

Be thou to My purpose true ; 
Go and strengthen other workers, 

Still thy faithful way pursue." 

Written for our admonition ; 

We the truth to heart will take, 
When our faith seems slow and halting, 

And syad fears our courage shake. 

Unto us in hours of darkness 

When our hearts send up the cry, 

"Lord, I perish in this conflict, 
Send Thy help, or else I die," 

Comes again God's holy angel 
Touching us with healing hand, 

Lifts us from our low desponding, 
Bidding us upright to s,tand. 



Closer to us than our breathing, 
Keeping watch upon His own, 

Is our mighty God and Father, 
Sitting King upon His throne. 

Comforts us with His blest Spirit, 
Walking with us through the strife; 

And for every hour of weakness 
Offers His abounding life. 

— The New York Observer. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $1.00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, '897, at the 
Post Office at Chicag-o, III., under Ace of M .rch 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



Indiana State Convention 193 

President John W. Cook Calls "Frats" 

a Menace . . . • 193 

"Epsilon"— 'A Baptist Missionary , So- 
ciety 193 

Socialist Threatens Masons 193 

The Morgan Monument ( Photograph )... 194 
Niagara, the Grave of Morgan. By John 

Greenleaf Whittier 194 

Samuel D. Greene (Conclusion of 

Sketch) 195 

How Presiding Elders Cater to the Lodge. 

By Rev. G. A. Pegram 197 

Masons' 175th Anniversary. By Rev. 

J. M. Foster 20u 

President Blanchard's Letter 203 

The Lodgemaivs Song. By George A. 

Creekmore 207 

Our Imperative Needs 208 

News of Our Work :208 

Indiana State Convention — President's 

Call .208 

Two Great Conventions 208 

Iowa State Convention Minutes 209 

Address to the People of Iowa .210 

Iowa Treasurer's Report 211 

Iowa Convention 212 

Report of Michigan Convention 212 

The Michigan Anti-secret-society Conven- 
tion ., 213 

New York-New Jersey Convention — Con- 
densed Minutes 215 



A Good Record — W. B. Stoddard's Report 

for October .217 

Michigan State Agent's Report 218 

Mrs. Lizzie Woods' Letter .219 

Report of Special Agent 220 

Retrospect and Prospect. By Rev. James 
P. Stoddard 221 

SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

"A SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES" 

By Rev. S. P. Long, A. M., Pastor of First 
English Lutheran Church, Mansfield, Ohio. A 
very convincing article against secret societies 
argued from a Scriptural standpoint. 27 pages, 
8vo., paper cover, 7c, per doz. 60c. 

"DIE RELIGION DER QEHETMEN GE- 

SELLSCHAPTEN" 

By Prof. Gottfried Fritschel, D. D., of the 
Wartburg Theological Seminary. 76 pages, 
paper cover, 25c, per doz. $2.40. 

"WAS HAT DIE KIRCHE MIT DER LOGE 

ZU THUNP" 

By Rev. Prof. George Fritschel of Wartburg 
Theological Seminary, Dubuque, la. 44 pages, 
paper cover, 10c. per doz. $1.00. 

"THESEN NEBER DIE GEHEIMEN GEr- 
SELLSCHAFTEN." 

By Prof. Gottfried Fritschel, D. D. Paper 5c. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary W. E. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes : "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of- 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D„ ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
shining Freemasons in the Christian Church. 10 
cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THE 
CHRISTIAN RELJGION. 

B.v '-Spectator," Auanta, Ga. 16 pages; 
5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revela- 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
Interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr.- . Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Cla'tns and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by fcx-President Charles Q. Finney, 
of Oberlin O liege. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when be became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to the world; and in secret have I said nothing." John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, NOVEMBER, 1908. 



NUMBER 7 



INDIANA STATE CONVENTION. 

Please read and heed the call of Pres- 
ident L. G, Bears, in this number, for the 
Annual Meeting and Convention to meet 
November 17th and 18th, in Fort Wayne. 
The Bible Training School has opened its 
doors again. This School is well worth 
a visit. Every delegate then will get a 
double blessing, and have an opportunity 
also to bless others. 



PRESIDENT JOHN W. COOK 
Calls Frats a Menace. 

That high school fraternities and sor- 
orities are an intolerable nuisance and 
that they should be sternly repressed and 
stamped out as tending to foster class 
distinctions and to make snobs and prigs 
of the pupils was the declaration of Pres- 
ident John W. Cook of the Northern 
Illinois State Normal School of Dekalb 
on October 20th before the Illinois Con- 
gress of Mothers at Evanston. The wo- 
men in attendance at once broke into 
long and hearty applause, his denuncia- 
tion of "the undemocratic and un-Amer- 
ican institution that is building up an 
aristocracy in our schools" provoking a 
greater outburst of approval than any- 
thing else said during the day. 



EPSILON. 

The newest sorority of which we have 
heard is called by the initial letter of the 
word (ekklesia) by which the church is 
named in the Greek New Testament. The 
Epsilon is a woman's missionary society 
in a Baptist church. 

Not long ago there was an initiation in 
which part of the ceremony was person- 
ating missionaries who were in heathen 
lands. There is no reason to question 
that something was worked into the 
meeting that might help the members or 
bring aid to missions ; nor need a good 



intention be questioned ; yet we cannot 
forget that the same experiment was tried 
in the interest of total abstinence. Secret 
societies are below the dignity of mis- 
sions ; their method is that of the pagan 
orders. Darkness is not the natural 
victor over darkness ; and the purpose o,f 
a missionary society like this, seems op- 
posed by its pagan method. 



SOCIALIST THREATENS MASONS. 

For several days early in September 
there was trouble among men out of 
work in Glasgow, Scotland, and the 
threatening attitude of socialist leaders 
called out a large extra police force. On 
the night of September 6th one of these 
announced the decision to make a series 
of midnight marches into the wealthy 
parts of the city. He also told what pen- 
alty would follow if the Municipal Coun- 
cil neglected to do something for the 
agitators out of work, within a month. 
What he would do in that case was to re- 
veal all the secrets of the Masonic order, 
and cause all the men, women, and child- 
ren in Glasgow to know all the tokens, 
grips, and passwords of Masonry. How 
easily the Romish church could do that, 
if it really wished to root up what a 
Catholic said would destroy Protestant- 
ism. 

How easily, also, would it be for any 
person to do, privately, what this man 
said he would do openly. Any village 
could be quickly saturated with knowl- 
edge, by mailing tracts or pamphlets to 
families in that one place once or twice. 
A few earnest men with but slender 
funds could, in some such way, soon 
fortify the young people of the country 
towns of a county against temptations 
that will assail them after they leave 
home to live in larger places full of 
lodges as well as rum holes. 



394 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 




THE MORGAN MONUMENT. 

The monument to Capt. William Mor- 
gan stands in the cemetery at Batavia, 
New York, a few feet from the track of 
the New York Central Railroad: and can 
be seen from the passing trains. It was 
-erected by the National Christian Asso- 
ciation, from the contributions of hun- 
dreds of people throughout the country, 
and was unveiled at its fourteenth An- 
nual Convention, in the presence of an 
immense concourse of people who gath- 
ered^ pay a tribute of respect to tire 
heroism of the man whose courage and 
devotion to his country it is designed to 
perpetuate. It was eighty-two vears ago 
last September that Captain Morgan was 
abducted and murdered for exposing the 
secrets of Freemasonry. 



Beautiful earth, beautiful climate 
beautiful season— with beautiful people 
everywhere the whole world would be 
beautiful. Let us remove the blemishes 
and make it all beautiful !" 



^ "The most sincere and heartfelt weep- 
ing is done without the use of tears." 



This poem of Whittier's, and the para- 
graph following it, are taken from the 
book "Whiriier-Land," compiled by Sam- 
uel T. Pickard, author of the biography 
of the poet, in two volumes. 

NIAGARA, THE GRAVE OF MORGAN. 

BY JOHN GREENLEAF WIIITT1ER. 

Wild torrent of the lakes! fling out 

Thy mighty wave to breeze and sun," 
And let the rainbow curve ajbove ,< 

The foldings of thy cloud of dun. 
Uplift thy earthquake voice, and pour 
Its thunder to the reeling shore, 
Till cayerned cliff and hanging wood 
Roll back the echo of thy flood. 
For there is one who slumbers now 
Beneath thy bow-encircled brow, 
Whose spirit hath a voice and sign 
More strong, more terrible than thine. 

A million hearts have heard that cry 
Ring upward to the very sky; 
It thunders still — it cannot sleep, 
But louder than the troubled deep, 
When the fierce spirit of the air 
Hath made his arm of vengeance bare, 
And wave to wave is calling loud 
Beneath the veiling thunder-cloud; 
That potent voice is sounding still — 

The voice of unrequited ill. 

» 
t 

Dark cataract of the lakes! thy name 

Unholy deeds have linked to fame. 
High soars to heaven thy giant head, 

Even as a monument to him 
Whose cold, unheeded form is laid 

Down, down, amid thy caverns dim. 
His requiem the fearful tone 
Of waters falling from their throne 
In the mid-air, his burial shroud 
The wrea things of thy torrent-cloud, 
His blazonry the rainbow thrown 
Superbly round thy brow of stone. 

Aye, raise thy voice — the sterner one 
Which tells of crime in darkness done, 
Groans upward from thy prison gloom 
Like voices from the thunder's home. 
.And men have heard it, and the might 

Of freemen rising from their thrall 
Shall drag their fetters into light, 

And spurn and trample on them all. 
And vengeance long — too long delayed — 

Shall rouse to wrath the souls of men, 
And freedom raise her holy head 

Above thy fallen tyrant then. 
-From "Whittier-Land," compiled by 

Samuel T. Pickard. 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



195 



The foregoing "poem, which I have 
never seen in print, I find in a manu- 
script collection of Whittier's early 
poems, in the possession of his cousin, 
Ann Wendell, of Philadelphia. It is a 
political curiosity, being a reminiscence 
of the excitement caused by the mystery 
of the disappearance of William Mor- 
gan, in the vicinity of Niagara Falls, m 
1826. It was written in 1830, three 
years before Whittier became especially 
active in the anti-slavery cause. He was 
then working in the interest of Henry 
Clay as against Jackson, and the Whigs 
had adopted some of the watchwords of 

the Anti-Masonic party." — Samuel T. 
Pickard. 



SAMUEL D. GREENE. 

(Concluded from the October Cynosure, page 170.) 

Mr. Greene looked through the lodge- 
room to see if he could see any token of 
relenting in the face of any member; but 
could see none. His neighbor, friend, 
and fellow-citizen, was to be killed for 
publishing Masonic initiations as he 
had taken them ; and the Episcopal min- 
ister and every male member of his 
church, the leading members of the Pres- 
bvterian session of his own church, the 
officers of the county, and men deemed 
the best men in the community, were co- 
operating in or silently consenting to the 
deed. 

The Terror of the Lodge. 

Mr. Greene was a large, robust man of 
strong nerve; but, as he gave me these 
facts, his whole frame quivered with 
emotion. He said, "I dared not speak to 
my nearest friend. I went to the attic of 
my hotel, knelt, and there prayed to God 
till my sweat wet the floor where I 
knelt |? 

Aaron White, Esq., of Rhode Island, 
speaking of men's terror of the lodge, at 
that time, said to the writer, "You boys 
know nothing about it. The power of 
Masonry at that time was like the power 
of popery before Luther burnt the Pope's 
bull, and was not burned himself. Be- 
fore the rise of the Antimasonic party, 
and the revelations of the lodge secrets 



by hundreds and thousands of seceding 

Masons, every one stood in terror of it." 

Miller, the Printer, Kidnapped. 

At length Morgan was kidnapped ; and 
Mr. Greene learned that Miller was to be 
taken off. He ventured to tell this to his 
wife, but she regarded him as out of his 
head to think that Masons would do such 
things. "Are they not our best men?" 
He and Mrs. Greene stood at a window 
looking out on Miller's printing office. 

"Madame," said he, "stand here twenty 
minutes and you will see, for I hear the 
roar of their coming." And come they 
did, at noonday, rushed up the outside 
stairs which they were looking at, seized 
Miller and carried him off. Mr. Greene 
sent a man to Mrs. Miller, to say, "Mor- 
gan is gone and will never return. Your 
husband is taken, and if you wish ever to 
see him alive, go into the main street 
through the town and cry, 'Murder !' at 
the top of your voice." Mrs. Miller did 
as directed ; crowds gathered and follow- 
ed Miller and his captors to Ganson's 
tavern, where Morgan had been tried by 
a Masonic justice before they put him in 
Canandaigua jail. Miller was having a 
similar sham trial ; but the Masons were 
frightened by the crowd and let him re- 
turn. 

The People are Aroused. 

As on the morning of the Lexington 
battle, so now the people arose without 
leaders and the cry arose, "Where are our 
sheriffs, laws, grand juries? Have we no 
protection for property, person, families, 
or lives ?" The lodges in Batavia and the 
next towns met, and agreed to lie and 
say, "Morgan was taken for larceny ; the 
Masons had nothing to do with it." And 
good men, who afterward confessed this 
sin, with weeping, said, "We did not con- 
sider that we were lying, but keeping our 
Masonic oath to conceal." Children now 
live of men who confessed, in open 
church, their lying for the lodge, and 
were restored on repentance and confes- 
sion. The city of Galesburg, Illinois, 
was founded by godly men and women 
some of whose parents uttered and after- 
ward confessed those lies for the lodge. 

The grand jury of Genesee met — 
twenty-four men — and called Mr. 
Greene before them. "Mr. Greene," said 



196 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



their foreman, "we have called you to ask 
if you can give us any information con- 
cerning the disappearance of our fellow- 
citizen, William Morgan." They hoped 
Greene would lie and say he knew noth- 
ing of Morgan's taking off, and thus 
destroy his power to harm. the lodge; for 
they already believed Greene had tried to 
save Morgan, and, had saved Miller, for 
he let his livery horses go to bring Miller 
back. 

The Martyr Spirit in Samuel D. Greene. 

This was a most terrible trial for Mr. 
Greene. But he had trusted in God, and 
resolved to die rather than cover crime. 
All the grand jury were Masons but two. 
Mr. Greene straightened himself up, and, 
pointing first to the foreman and then to 
the Masons in succession, replied : "You 
know who took Morgan off ! — and you ! 
— and you ! — Where shall I begin ?" 

With clenched fists and flaming eyes 
they plunged at him, uttering oaths of 
vengeance ; and Mr. Greene declared to 
me that he believed they would have 
murdered him, in their rage and mad- 
ness ; but the two non-Masons who were 
jurymen sprang to his side and said, "Mr. 
Greene, we have taken none of their 
cursed oaths, and you sha'n't be hurt for 
telling the truth." 

The people on the outside were listen- 
ing. They began clamoring for admis- 
sion. The door of the jury-room was 
burst open, and the Masons swallowed 
their rage and slunk away before the won- 
dering and indignant multitude. So the 
grand jury of Genesee county obtained 
no sworn falsehood that day to cover the 
murder of Morgan. 

Mr. Greene was then president of the 
trustees of Batavia. From that time he 
was pursued by Masons, as bloodhounds 
used to pursue their human prey in the 
South. They killed his brute animals. 
They invented lies to destroy his hotel 
business, and Masonic papers printed 
them. They arrested him on mock 
charges, and in short did what as Ma- 
sons they had sworn to do; and they 
would have murdered him a thousand 
times but for the rise of the people 
against the lodges and the merciful pro- 
vidence of God, such as He displayed in 



the life of Baruch in the days of Jeremiah 
the prophet, when the Masonic religions 
had broken down the Hebrew common- 
wealth and destroyed all human security 
for liberty or life. 

Mr. Greene, aided by Rev. Dr. Increase 
N. Tarbox, one of the holiest and loveli- 
est of men, compiled and condensed from 
his own writings the little book called 
"The Broken Seal." [See footnote.] * 

"^x >jC ^c 

Mr. Greene died in a. good old age, 
honored and beloved by the faithful, and 
respected by all who knew him, even 
though they dared not stand with him 
against the lodge. Those who attended 
the Syracuse Convention in 1873, saw the 
venerable man standing on the platform 
with Gerrit Smith and David Bernard, 
and they seemed like three angels from 
the clouds, which soon after hid them, to 
assure us that there are no secret societies 
in heaven nor will be on earth when the 
Lord's Prayer is answered and God's will 
is "done on earth as it is in heaven." 

Mr. Greene's old age was brightened 
by a most amiable and beloved wife, and 
his grave has been visited and honored 
like the tomb of a prophet. 

Jonathan Blanchard. 



"The Broken Seal, or Personal Reminiscences! 
of the Abduction and Murder of Capt. William 
Morgan." One of the most interesting hooks ever 
published. It is now out of print. — Editor. 



Do our readers reflect that all the time 
there are many who are thinking about 
joining some secret order, and that these 
people need, at the time when they are 
still free yet almost snared, truth that will 
keep them free? Are there not many 
who wish they had known the Cynosure, 
or some good book or tract which they 
have since found, before they wore the 
galling chain of a secret order, or be- 
came fettered with wrong obligations? 
May they not do well to reflect that an- 
other is almost lured to the brink of that 
down which they have fallen ? One way 
to save another is to mail a tract ; another, 
to send twenty-five cents to this office for 
a limited, three months' subscription, 
adding his address. If you have fallen 
into a pitfall, set up a sign for another 
coming in the same path. 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CY1SOSUKE. 



197 



Contribute* 



HOW PRESIDING ELDERS CATER TO 
THE LODGE. 

BYtR'EV. G. A. TEGRAM. ' i 
(Continued' from March, 1908; Cynosure, page 328.) 

4. In the autumn of 1902, a presiding 
elder in the, Detroit Conference wrote 
me, asking me if I would take a charge 
in Michigan. I, wrote him in reply that 
I preferred to work in the north, and that 
my friends and .relatives wanted me to 
comeback north,; but ., that I might not 
suit him, for four, reasons, viz.: I was a 
strong prohibitionist, ;was. opposed to 
secret societies, was, averse to destructive 
Biblical criticism, and believed in run- 
ning the, church by .its own Discipline. 
He replied immediately, saying that he 
was highly pleased with the description 
which -I had given of myself, and that 
he agreed with me on all those points, 
and requested me to come immediately. 

I came, but he had argument with me 
before I went to the charge. He insist- 
ed on my saying nothing against secret 
societies to my parishioners publicly. Why 
did he not write that way before I came? 
Why did he say he was highly pleased 
with the description which I had given of 
myself, when I said, among other things, 
I was opposed to secret societies? Why 
did he not tell me his views before I 
came? It looked as if he tried to hood- 
wink me to get me to come. That is not 
all. He wrote me that he did not be- 
long to any secret society. In civil law 
it is a state's-prison offense to obtain 
goods under false pretenses. Some time 
after I came, a man told me that this 
presiding elder told him shortly before I 
came, that he did belong but did not at- 
tend ; that he carried an insurance in a 
secret society, and joined it for that pur- 
pose. Moreover, several ministers told 
me that he belonged to one, and possibly 
more lodges. Another person told me 
that she heard the presiding elder advise 
a young preacher to join and get his life 
insured. Some others said they heard 
him commend the lodge and its work. 
All this goes to show that all of his con- 
duct was such as to make an impression 
on the public mind that he not only favor- 



ed lodges but belonged to them. All of 
these testimonies were direct, and were 
not mere rumors. This putting of the 
case is just as mild as the evidence will 
permit. 




GEORGE A. PEGRAM. 

When I first came, I was exceedingly 
popular. They all thought I deserved an 
appointment much larger than this. But 
when I refused urgent invitations to join 
the Oddfellows and Maccabees I soon be- 
came as unpopular as I had formerly 
been popular. This presiding elder 
catered to the lodge element, and opposed 
me. The more the lodge element opposed 
me, the more the real, genuine Christ- 
ians favored me, defended me, and sup- 
ported me. But the presiding elder usu- 
ally ignored everything the faithful did 
or said in my behalf, and always credited 
everything the lodge folks said. 

In less than two years I paid off the 
church debt, trebled the benevolent col- 
lections and the church papers taken, put 
in three or four hundred religious books, 
organized two new classes at other 
places destitute of services, and organ- 
ized three or four temperance societies 
which revolutionized political conditions 
in two or three " ~Mr" : es In short, the 



10S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



charge prospered so much that this pre- 
siding elder divided it the very year I 
left it. This division itself is prima 
facie evidence that he recognized its 
prosperity in my hands. 

In spite of all this I was sent to a 
small country circuit, made from scraps 
of two others. One point on my previ- 
ous charge had sent in, unknown to me, 
a unanimous recommendation to him in 
my favor. They had spoken to me of 
getting up a petition for my return. I 
opposed it as contrary to the spirit of 
Methodist polity. Hence they got up this 
recommendation. 

I protested to the presiding elder 
against such arrant injustice. He said it 
was of no use, for the people would not 
tolerate my opposition to secret societies. 
Bi^t if I would let lodges alone, he could 
send me to several good charges, much 
better than my former one. In fact, he 
spoke as if I could get an excellent ap- 
pointment if it were not for my posi- 
tion on the lodge question. He spoke so 
favorably that I asked him what grade 
of appointment I could get if I did not 
oppose secret societies. He replied im- 
mediately, "You could get the best there 
is." So, although he thought I deserved 
the best there was, yet on account of my 
opposition to lodges he gave me one of 
the worst there was, where I got $120 
for nine months' work. 

I want to say that I have never been 
called back to any charge so many times 
as I have to that from which he cast me 
down. They would never accept my res- 
ignation of the presidency of the temper- 
ance society, although I was twenty-five 
miles away. I have been called to preach 
and lecture in nearly every church in 
that community since I left it. The of- 
ficial minutes show that the charge, after 
it was divided, decreased in both mem- 
bers and contributions to benevolences. 

I heard several times that this presid- 
ing elder opposed me in the bishop's 
cabinet because of my stand on the lodge 
question. I want to say, for the benefit 
of the unsophisticated, that when a pre- 
siding elder becomes opposed to a min- 
ister, he tries to prejudice all the other 
elders against him. He will then say no 
other presiding elder wants him. A 



preacher's position in conference depends 
almost wholly upon his presiding elder. 
This is shown by the fact that usually a. 
minister who is a particular friend of a 
presiding elder is advanced right along, 
till the presiding elder goes back to the 
pastorate, when the preacher often goes 
down instead of up, or sometimes merely 
stops. 

5. The next presiding elder for whom 
I preached knew of my position on the 
secrecy question before he appointed me 
on his district. He had heard my former 
presiding elder speak of it a number of 
times. He professed to be opposed to 
secret societies, and said he had never be- 
longed to any. He not only acknowl- 
edged that they were injurious to the 
church ; he insisted and argued to me,, 
personally and privately, that they were 
detrimental to church, state, society, and 
business. He thought they were espec- 
ially injurious to the spiritual interests of 
the church. He even mentioned various 
ways in which they were injurious. 

But in spite of all his declarations 
against organized secrecy, on his very 
first visit to my church he was advising 
me against saying anything about the 
lodges. "Just preach the gospel." That 
is not all. I never remember of his visit- 
ing my charge without advising me 
against any public opposition to secret 
societies. He seemed always afraid I 
would do it, and do it too much ; al- 
though I never preached on it but once 
or twice during the eighteen months he 
was my presiding elder. I never did un- 
less it seemed absolutely necessary. 

I asked him how any man could 
keep silent upon the subject and be clear 
before God of the blood all men, if 
lodges were as injurious as he thought 
they were. He said a man could not. 
Yet in spite of it all, he went right on 
advising me that it was not wise to do 
it, even if it was injuring both souls and 
the church. How can any man refuse 
to warn souls against anything which 
would hinder or hurt them? Yet the pre- 
siding elder not only refused to do it, 
but insisted that I should not, even af- 
ter saying a minister could not be clear 
and not do it. 

His attitude toward the lodge, and 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



199 



lodgemen, was another thing that indi- 
cated that he catered to the lodge. Once, 
when he was giving his customary peri- 
odical advice, he stated as a reason, that 
the "Masons were just about as good as 
any of them," meaning other church- 
members. On another occasion he men- 
tioned something which reflected upon 
the Maccabees. He worried about it 
that night and the next day till he left, 
for fear it might injure him. When I 
"went to my last charge, he took special 
pains to turn my attention very favor- 
ably to three or four persons, every one 
■of whom was a leading lodgeman. 

Furthermore, I noticed that when he 
came on his quarterly visits he always 
wanted to see men who were prominent 
lodgemen. It did not matter whether 
they were pious or not. On my last 
charge I boarded in a family who were 
opposed to secret societies. . When he 
came to this charge, every time but once, 
he went to the home of some lodgeman 
to be entertained. He came to town 
several times and never even visited the 
pastor, nor visited his boarding house. 
This is considered among Methodist 
people a very serious breach of cour- 
tesy, and of justice, too. On the other 
hand, he never seemed to care for the 
poor, no matter how pious or faithful 
they were. I am told that he always 
showed the same spirit, even in the pas- 
torate. His former parishioners have 
told me that he always favored the mon- 
eyed men and lodgemen. 

When a few leading lodgemen on my 
last charge became hostile to me, he 
sided with them, in spite of the fact that 
two petitions were sent him in my fa- 
vor. There was not a single opponent 
who was not a lodgeman — not one, and 
even some in the lodge sided with me, 
desiring fair play. 

Two families of Masons ruled one 
church, and four families of Oddfellows 
another. I sought a change by recom- 
mending justice and suggesting a course 
fair to all. They voted down every sug- 
gestion, and voted in more of their own 
clique, in true lodge style. I announced 
that I would preach on lodgery at those 
two churches. While preaching at the 
first place, the presiding elder and 



another minister came in. This was on 
Sunday afternoon. After I had fin- 
ished preaching, he arose and denounced 
me for preaching on that subject. He 
said he did not feel at home there, was 
not accustomed to hearing the Metho- 
dist church, her bishops and elders, 
slandered. He said that he was going to 
preach at the other place himself, and 
that he was going to remove me from 
the charge. When he arose to preach 
at the other church, to a congregation 
assembled to hear me preach, several left, 
and went to another church. Quite i. 
number left both churches when he re- 
moved me, and even some sinners have 
never attended there since. Moreover, 
I have never heard of a single convert 
since, although many were under con- 
viction, and people were turning to the 
Lord. 

At both of these places the presiding 
elder was entertained by Masons. They 
also belonged to several other orders. 
He also changed the place of the next 
quarterly conference, which was con- 
trary to the discipline, and appointed it 
at the house of a strong and prominent 
lodgeman. The people he favored on 
this charge were all lodgemen. The 
people he most opposed were all anti- 
lodge men and women. 

Although this man has ahvavs denied 
ever having had any connection with a 
secret society, some of both laymen and 
ministers — Methodists and others, lodge- 
men and anti-lodgemen — have all de- 
clared that he did belong to more than 
one.' I have heard of both Maccabees 
and Masons who claimed that he be- 
longed to their lodges. If he does not, 
he has followed a course which strong- 
ly supports the claim. If he does not, he 
can act and preach in such a way that 
nobody, neither friend nor foe, can doubt 
it. O elder, please forgive us if we are 
mistaken, and do please act and preach 
in such a straightforward way as to re- 
lieve our minds of this painful suspense. 
We will be only too glad to welcome you 
to our ranks, and grant yon the right 
hand of fellowship, it you will only de- 
clare to lodgemen — not to us — that you 
are, were, always will be, on our side. 
Will you do it ' 



200 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



6. Since I left the pastorate,' the peo- 
ple of another parish have desired me 
to become their pastor. The pastor who 
was leaving knew about it and wrote 
me. He said he spoke to the presiding 
elder about it, and advised me to write 
him about it, as he said he had no man 
as yet for the place. I did so. I told 
him my position on the secrecy question. 
I never received any answer. At the 
next annual conference the delegate from 
that church said they still wanted me. 
Yet presiding elders will say that no 
church wants an anti-secret minister. 

To you folks who do not understand 
the tricks of presiding elders, I want to 
tell you their scheme. They always pre- 
tend not to know of anything favorable 
to anti-secret ministers. They ignore 
everything that is favorable, and credit 
everything that is unfavorable. No mat- 
ter whether it is a personal letter, or ad- 
vice, or request, or a petition, or com- 
mittee, in your favor, they completely ig- 
nore it, act and talk as if they nevel 
knew or heard anything about it. The 
previous presiding elder received per- 
sonal letters, personal requests and two 
petitions in my favor, yet he set them all 
aside for the clamor of a few worldly 
lodgemen. 

III. The presiding elders cater to the 
lodge for two reasons : 

1. They seem to fear that any oppo- 
sition to lodges will ruin the church. 
This position is itself a recognition of 
the power of the lodge over the church. 
The church receives its stamp from the 
kind of people taken into it. You. can 
have whichever class you work for, the 
.good or bad, the devoted or devilish, the 
worldly or Christian workers, lodge 
folks or anti-lodge folks. Driving out 
or keeping out the real, devoted Christ- 
ians will sap the spiritual life of any 
church. If any are kept out, let it be 
the worldly ones. This will eliminate 
worldliness and cultivate spirituality. 

2. Nearly every presiding elder seems 
to be afraid that any real, open opposi- 
tion to the lodge will endanger his posi- 
tion, influence, and salary. Their posi- 
tion is rather difficult. They have to 
deal with both preachers and laymen. 
But there are two classes in every 



church. If we cannot please both, why 
not favor the good, and not the bad? 
Moreover, this does not meari hostility 
to the bad, personally. "We know that 
we have pased from death unto life, be- 
cause we love the brethren..'-' ,(L John 
3:14.) "Know ye not that the friend- 
ship of the world is enmity with God? 
Whosoever therefore will be a friend of 
the world is the enemy of God." (James 
4:4.) Standing by the right, we in- 
crease both numbers and influence of the 
good. Yet the majority of presiding el- 
ders will side with the lodge, because it 
seems strongest in number and influence. 
But right is right, no matter whether 
popular and strong or not. 



MASONS' 175th ANNIVERSARY. 

REV. J. M. FOSTER, BOSTON. 

The establishment of St John's Lodge 
of Free and Accepted Masons, 175 years 
ago, was celebrated in our city this week. 
The Grand Masters of thirteen jurisdic- 
tions, which are conterminous with the 
boundaries of the thirteen original States, 
and the Grand Master of the Masons of 
Nova Scotia, together with the officers of 
the grand lodges of Massachusetts, met 
in Masonic Temple at 2 p. m. last Sab- 
bath and marched in their regalia to Tre- 
mont Temple, followed by a long proces- 
sion of white-aproned men, and occupied 
seats on the platform, three thousand 
people being packed in the great hall and 
as many outside unable to gain an en- 
trance. Five famous male quartettes 
rendered music. The Worshipful Mas- 
ter, Leonard G. Roberts, gave the intro- 
ductory address. Rev. George W. Col- 
son offered prayer, and Bishop John W. 
Hamilton, of the M. E, Church, deliver- 
ed the sermon. Basing his remarks on 
a verse from the 46th Psalm, and also one 
from the 36th chapter of Isaiah, he iden- 
tified the Masonic fraternity with Solo- 
mon King of Israel and Hiram King of 
Tyre, building the temple in Jerusalem. 
"The temple is gone and the tribes of 
Israel are scattered abroad among all 
nations, but their God is the God and 
Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. All 
Free and Accepted Masons are their fel- 
low craftsmen and their God is the God 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



201 



of Masonry. If men have one Father, 
then all of us are brethren. The only 
hope of uniting all the nationalities of 
New England, for instance, is to be found 
in the Christian faith. There can be but 
one universal empire. Without God all 
government is anarchy, and the only 
cure for anarchy is the monarchy of 
Jesus Christ." Upon this we wish to re- 
flect. In it there is a strange and em- 
barrassing confusion. 




J. M. FOSTER. 

I. He identifies the church of the liv- 
ing God with the synagogue of Satan. 
The temple of Solomon, built upon 
Mount' Moriah, by divine appointment, 
was a type of the church of Christ. "Ye 
are built upon the foundation of the 
apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ Him- 
self being the chief corner stone; in 
Whom all the building, fitly framed to- 
gether, groweth unto an holy temple in 
the Lord : in Whom ye also are builded 
together for an habitation of God 
through the Spirit." The church began 
its career in the Garden of Eden and will 
continue until the last trump shall sound. 
It has had its Patriarchal, its Jewish dis- 



pensations, and now has its Christian dis- 
pensation, and will yet have its millenial 
dispensation on earth, and its resurrec- 
tion dispensation in eternal glory in the 
heavenly country. God made a covenant 
with Abraham. The promise was, the 
man should become a family, the family 
should become a nation, out of the nation 
should come a Deliverer, the Deliverer 
would establish a kingdom, and the king- 
dom would become universal. We have 
the man, the family, the nation, the De- 
liverer and the kingdom. These are the 
"gulf-stream" of history. And it is car- 
rying us out into the great ocean of uni- 
versal triumph. 

But the Masonic, secret, oath-bound 
lodge-system is Satan's counterfeit of the 
church of Christ, and its claims are the 
product of "the father of lies." In- 
stead of being identified with Solomo.i's 
workmen building the temple, the Grand 
Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons did 
not exist until 1717. Instead of being 
built upon the Fatherhood of God and 
the brotherhood of man, it excludes the 
maimed, the halt and the blind, those 
physically and mentally and financially 
unfit, together with all women and 
children. Instead of making Jesus Christ, 
the living Redeemer, the foundation to 
Whom men, women and children of all 
nations, without exception and of all 
classes, without distinction, shall come, 
as lively stones to be built up a spiritual 
house for God, the Masons select a few- 
able-bodied and sound-minded males to 
be built with the untempered morter or 
good works into a house for Satan. In- 
stead of accepting the Bible as God's 
holy word, in which the Personal Word 
is revealed as God manifest in the flesh 
and giving His life as a ransom for sin- 
ners, they cut out the name of Jesus Clin -: 
from every verse in which that name, 
above every name, occurs, and they leave 
the true Christian in the bewilderment 
and distressing anguish of Marv Magda- 
lene at the empty tomb of our Lord, 
when she said: They have taken away 
my Lord and I know not where they have 
laid Him." 

2. He claims for Masonry universal 

empire, which belongs to Christ. He b* 
came obedient unto death, even the death 



202 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



of the cross, wherefore God also hath 
highly exalted Him, and given Him a 
name that is above every name, that at 
the name of Jesus every knee should bow 
and every tongue should confess that 
Jesus Christ is Lord. He must reign 
until His foes are made His footstool. 
And when He shall have subdued all au- 
thority and power, the angels will pro- 
claim: "The kingdoms of this world 
have become the empire of our Lord and 
of His Christ." 

But Satan is the god of this world. 
The whole world lieth in the wicked one. 
In the temptation of our Lord in the 
wilderness, Satan took Him into a great 
high mountain and showed all the king- 
doms of the world. He pointed to 
Greece, to Spain, to Germany, to Egypt, 
to Babylon, to China, to India, and 
Africa. He represented the unity of all 
these in the Roman Empire. All these 
Satan claimed as his. He had given them 
their authority; and they did his will. 
"Now," said Satan, "all these I will give 
you on one simple condition, that you fall 
down and worship me. You need not go 
to Jerusalem and die to purchase your 
kingdom. I will give all to- you for one 
act of homage to me." But our Lord re- 
pudiated the temptation — "Get thee be- 
hind Me, Satan." 

Bishop Hamilton is repeating Satan's 
false offer. He proposes to give the 
world to Christ on condition that His 
people engage in the false worship of the 
lodge, where "they sacrifice to devils and 
not to God." The Masonic lodge has 
stolen Christ's livery in which to serve 
the devil. Rome Pagan was Satan's 
counterfeit of the Kingdom of God and 
it was destroyed by the divine judgments. 
Rome Papal is Satan's counterfeit of 
Christ's Kingdom and that is to be over- 
thrown by God's judgments. And the 
secret, oath-bound lodge-system is 
Satan's counterfeit of Christ's church. 
And that is prepared for God's wrath. 
God was hindered from destroying Sod- 
om until Lot and his family were taken 
out. And God withholds His indignation 
from the secret empire of Satan until His 
people obey tht command: "Come out of 
her, my people, that ye be not partakers 



of her sins, and that ye receive not of her 
plagues." 

3. He courts inglorious defeat for the 
church. The abominable feature of our 
American policy in the Philippines is, that 
our army is used to force the Filipinos to 
accept the Roman friars against their 
will. A Protestant nation compelling 
a subject people to accept Romanism is 
a horrible monstrosity. And for a Meth- 
odist bishop to recommend a department 
of Satan's kingdom to the followers of 
Christ is a shocking perversion of his 
commission. As certainly as God reigns,, 
our Philippine policy will be rebuked. 
And as certainly as Christ is on the 
throne, so surely will He chastise His 
professed church for taking into her 
bosom Satan and his kingdom of dark- 
ness. "Shouldest thou help the ungodly? 
Should thy hand be with his?" One 
Achan in the camp caused the army of 
Israel to be defeated before Ai. Ariel 
when the camp is full of Achans, whaj: 
can we expect but humiliating and inglo- 
rious and disastrous defeat ? When the 
water comes into the ship it goes dowri. 
When the world comes into the church it 
sinks under the wrath of God. Only the 
hand that was pierced can save. And Pie 
will save only by purifying from sin. 
Every disciple of Christ should separate 
from the Lodge. The church should de- 
mand separation from the Lodge as a 
condition of fellowship. This is the posi- 
tion of rectitude. This is the attitude of 
power. 



$450 NEEDED. 

Mr. Edmond Ronayne, who requires 
no introduction to our readers, has rec- 
ently moved to Boulder, Colorado — ad- 
dress, R. F. D. 2, care of C. H. Crandall. 
Will not some of his friends who read 
this, loan him four hundred and fifty 
dollars, secured by a mortgage on his 
place in Arkansas which he has just left? 
He advises us that he is very much in 
need of the above-mentioned amount, in 
order to successfully support himself in 
his new home. He writes: "Wonder if 
any of the wealthy Cynosure readers 
could not loan us $400 or $450, taking 
a mortgage on our place, to be paid back 
when the place is sold?" 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



203 




CHARLES A. BLANCHARD. 

PRESIDENT BLANCHARD'S LETTER. 

Fathers and Brethren : I feel impressed 
to make the subject of my letter this 
month. — 

Anarchistic Oaths. 

I have at various times referred to the 
topic, but at this time, as God shall help, 
I desire to treat it more in detail than 
heretofore. The city of Chicago has been 
for several years agitated on the subject 
of the Sunday closing of saloons. There 
has been an effort to compel the Mayor 
of the city to act in accordance with his 
oath of office and shut them up. He has 
steadily refused to do so, and has justi- 
fied himself for his refusal by declaring 
that he stated, when a candidate for the 
office, that he would not enforce that law 
if elected. As the people elected him on 
this declaration, he holds that he is in- 
nocent in his false swearing. 



As to the facts in the case there is no 
dispute. It is admitted by both parties 
that the Mayor did, before his election, 
advertise his purpose to disregard his 
oath in case he was elected. It is admit- 
ted that on this declaration he was the 
successful candidate. It is further ad- 
mitted that, being inducted into office, he 
has fulfilled his pre-election promise and 
allowed the saloons to do business seven 
days a week, in violation of the law 
which the Mayor was compelled to swear 
that he would enforce in order to secure 
his office. The question whether he can 
be compelled to keep his oath, is now be- 
fore the Supreme Court of the State. 
What the decision of that court will be, 
we cannot tell ; but it is an encouraging 
fact, that that tribunal has generally been 
on the side of the law. We have a right 
to hope and believe that it will be in this 
instance, until we know that it proves 
recreant to its high trust. 

How Dare Men Thus Break Oaths? 

The mere multiplication of solemn 
affirmations, tends to make them contemp- 
tible. If a man should solemnly declare, 
before God, that he would bring in a pail 
of water, buy a pound of sugar, tie a 
horse to the fence, or take off his shoes 
before he went to bed, the result would 
be that his entire character would be de- 
stroyed: not because there was anything 
wrong in the promises but because they 
were of such a character that no appeal 
to God was needful. The man who 
should be continually appealing to the 
Most High for the fulfilling of such 
pledges, would show that he had no real 
respect for God ; and every such oath 
would be profane. 

But such swearing is not only pro- 
fane: like all other profanity, it tends to 
break down all respect for all oaths. Per- 
sons who swear in this way not only 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



swear profanely ; they swear falsely. The 
oath becomes contemptible to them. But 
still more, and worse, when one oath has 
been thus degraded, all other oaths are 
practically destroyed. 

All Lodge Swearing Anarchistic. 

The application of the principles stated 
is obvious. Our civil officers are very 
largely lodgemen. In their lodges they 
have been trained to swear all sorts of 
foolish and silly oaths. They swear that 
they will not tell anyone how they are 
dressed — or undressed — when they are 
initiated. They swear that they will help 
their friends when in need. They appeal 
to God for their fidelity to a pledge not to 
steal from a brother lodgeman or a lodge. 
They call Him to witness that they will 
not commit adultery with the female rel- 
atives of their lodge brethren. They 
swear that they will not give their lodge 
signs except under certain circum- 
stances, and that they will obey them 
when others give them. 

The result on character hardly needs 
to be stated. Of course men thus train- 
ed look upon an oath as a trifling thing, 
to be observed or disregarded as they 
may choose. Right here is the secret of 
the present carnival of perjury. Officers 
of high and low degree, officers execu- 
tive and officers judicial, plaintiffs, de- 
fendants, and witnesses, all are likely to 
be men who have sworn so many lodge 
oaths that the civil oath which they swear 
in a court has no more sacredness to 
them than a pan of potato -peelings which 
are thrown out into a back yard. And 
when a man has fallen so low that he 
has no fear of God, he never has any real 
regard for man. If he does not kill or 
steal, it is because he fears personal in- 
convenience, not because he has any ob- 
jection to the thing itself. 
"Can't Fool All the People All the Time." 

This saying of the great Lincoln is, 
like most of his sayings, true and im- 



1 



portant. Even to a careless and sleepy 
nation there comes a time of waking up J 
We are by the grace of God in such an \ 
era now. - The.distinguishing characteris- j 
tics of this particular age are the mani- 
festation of God's power, and a disposi- ! 
tion to inquire on the part of the man in ; 
the street. Grafting senators and judges j 
are being called to account in a manner! 
which must surprise them. Officers who I 
have accumulated large fortunes by legal 
but immoral methods are being asked to 
render an account of their. -stewardship, 
at a time when^hey -supposed that they j 
were quite past such a danger. The les- ; 
son is, that God does not forget, and that j 
our only safety is io be and do right ; and j 
if we have already been and done wrong, j 
to get right. 

I have repeatedly in these letters j 
Spoken of the national uprising against 
secret societies in our high schools. I p 
mention it at this time as an instance of \ 
the truth under consideration. For years 
men slept while the lodge demons were 
sowing tares in the colleges of our coun- 
try. It seemed as if God Himself did 
not care. Young men were maimed and 
killed, were corrupted and destroyed, 
with none to say nay. The few who pro- 
tested were looked upon as well-meaning 
fools. The pulpit was silent except in a 
few honorable instances, and the press 
was on the side of the evil ; while courts 

and legislatures did not know that there 
was a secret society in the world — I mean 

they did not seem to know. Of course 
during all these years lodges were elect- 
ing their tools to do their work : and fel- 
ons were not only unpunished ; they were 
made lawmakers and judges of courts. 
"""* What a Wonderful Change! 

The educational circular sent out by a 
State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion brings me the following note: "The 
Ohio Legislature has passed the bill abol- 
ishing high-school fraternities. It is now 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



203 



the duty of the school-board to deny the 
privileges of the high school to any pu- 
pil who continues his membership in a 
high-school fraternity; and any teacher 
or superintendent who fails to perform 
his duty in the matter, as outlined in the 
law, is subject to a heavy fine." And 
most sane people say, amen. 

The editor of The Educational Review 
of Brooklyn, N. Y., in an address deliv- 
ered last week before the Woman's Lit- 
erary Club of Hyde Park, used the fol- 
lowing language : 

"The fraternities are a 'breeding-ground 
for all forms of cheap snobbishness and 
make believe aristocrats. These organiza- 
tions are absolutely worthless. They wor- 
ship wealth, and it is only the rich student 
who gets any enjoyment or benefit (if there 
is any) out of them. 

"The elimination of these pests from the 
public high schools and the universities 
would be a most excellent thing. It would 
elevate the social tone and spirit of school 
life, and make for what is progressive and 
salutary." 

Mr. Andrews advocated the '.'spanking 
remedy," suggested by President Schneider, 
in handling stubborn high-school "children" 
who refuse to quit the fraternities. 

"A firm bedslat or a hickory cane would 
soon annihilate all these silly fraternity no- 
tions that the young high-school gentry have 
gone daft over," he said. 

All this is true, and has been true ; but 
what a marvel it is to have it proclaimed 
on the housetops in this fashion ! More 
and far worse is also true, and men are 
speaking out these needed truths ; and 
everywhere there is an awaking and a 
disposition to make the public schools 
safe places for boys and girls. 

Is a Lodge Oath Valid? 

This question was admirably answered 
by Mr. Pegram, our State Agent for 
Michigan, at the recent Convention in 
Grand Rapids. The address on the same 
subject made years ago by Dr. A. M. 
Milligan of Pittsburg, was also a final 
answer to the questions involved. If I 
were sure that you had at hand either of 



these complete discussions, I would not 
take your time for the brief argument 
which is here given. 

A valid oath is an oath to do a right- 
eous act. No oath to do evil is or can be 
binding. If a man were to swear a thou- 
sand times that he would commit a crime 
or do a base act, he could not thereby 
bind himself to an unrighteous deed. 
Evil is evil. Sin is sin. Crime is crime. 
No man can by an oath bind his con- 
science to an evil thing. Each time he 
swears such an oath he sins. All the 
time he is profaning the name of God. 
It is an insult to the Almighty to ask 
Him to be a party to an obligation to do 
wrong. 

A valid oath is imposed by lawful au- 
thority. The oath is a sacrament. It 
cannot be administered, innocently, by 
every Tom, Dick and Harry who would 
like to have somebody swear. The prop' 
er persons to administer oaths are the 
duly constituted authorities of church 
and state. A lodge has no more right to 
administer an oath than it has to counter- 
feit the currency. It is a far worse of- 
fense, in the sight of God, to counterfeit 
an oath than to counterfeit a coin. It is 
worse to injure a man's soul than to pick 
his pocket. 

A valid oath is one which is taken by 
a person who is able to enter into con- 
tract. An idiot, a lunatic, or a drunken 
man cannot swear a lawful oath. Nei- 
ther can a man do so who is in any way 
disabled from a full and intelligent con- 
sideration of the promises which he is 
asked to make with a solemn appeal to 
God for the due performance of the 
same. To put a man into a ridiculous 
situation, to frighten or embarrass him 
so that he is not in full possession of his 
judgment, is to render him incapable of 
swearing a valid oath. It is like making 
a man drunk in order to get his name on 
a legal document. 



20G 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



A valid oath is one which is not obtain- 
ed by duress. At times men in lodges 
have desired to withdraw, and have been 
compelled by threats to go forward and 
swear. Of course all such oaths are 
void. The very essence of the oath is 
that it is a free appeal to God for the 
truth of what is said, for the fulfilling 
of the promise which is made. In the 
Royal Arch chapter, when Rev. Nathan- 
iel Colver, D. D., refused to swear to 
aid a Royal Arch Companion whether he 
was right or wrong, the High Priest 
stepped down toward him and said, "Mr. 
Colver, you will swear that oath or you 
will never leave this chapter alive." The 
bogus high priest was mistaken in his 
man, and did not either scare or kill him. 
But what would a weak or timid man 
have done under those circumstances? 
Beyond a doubt he would have sworn the 
oath; and then the lodgemen who com- 
pelled him to swear it would have wanted 
to kill him if he broke it. All such oaths 
are from the beginning void. 

A valid oath is one which is not ob- 
tained by fraud. All contracts secured 
by wilful deception are void. A man 
cannot secure a promise from his fellow 
on one condition, and hold him to it on 
another. All secret orders assure those 
they are getting to take their oaths that 
these oaths are not in any way to con- 
flict with any of the duties which they 
owe to their families, their country, or 
their God. Of course the question is cer- 
tain to arise as to who is to judge wheth- 
er the lodge oath does conflict with these 

duties or not. 

At one time a man was taking the Ma- 
sonic oath in a lodge, but hesitated. He 
said, "Who is to judge whether this oath 
conflicts with my other duties or not?" 
The Master said, "You are to judge." A 
member of the lodge took issue with the 
Master, declaring that it would never do 
to allow each Mason to be his own judge 



on that subject. The Grand Lodge set- 
tled the matter, and decided that no Ma- 
son could lawfully question the rightful- 
ness of the oath. 

This an Inevitable Position. 

Of course the lodges must take this po- 
sition. And equally of course this makes 
the lodgeman a slave. He enters his or- 
der blindfold. He swears his oath as it 
is pieced out to him a few words at a 
time. If he is a common man he knows 
very little about his oath after he has 
taken it. He is assured that it will not 
conflict with any of his duties as a man; 
and when he thinks that it does, he is 
told that he has nothing to think about it 
— that the order has settled it for him. 
No intelligent freeman should submit to 
such a bondage for a single hour. 

But what should a conscientious man, 
who has his foot in such a trap, do? He. 
ought, first of all, to get his mind ab- 
solutely clear on the subject. He ought 
to see that all secret society oaths are in 
their very nature profane and wicked. 
He should see that, according to the 
laws of both God and man, such oaths 
are null and void. He ought to see that, 
instead of his being in debt to the order 
to keep its partial and bloody obliga- 
tions, the order is in debt to him for its 
shameless outrages and frauds. He 
ought to see that the only duty he has 
respecting such oaths is to repent of 
them, renounce them, expose them to the 
world. 

This was the opinion and teaching of 
President Finney and of many other able 
and godly men. It is the clear teaching 
of the Bible. The first five verses of 
the fifth chapter of Leviticus conclusive- 
ly prove it. The very nature of the 
case shows that it must be so. How can 
a man swear to things, the nature of 
which he does not know, and be guiltless 
if he fails to renounce and expose such 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



207 



orders to the world? Has he a right 
to stand by and see his fellowmen caught 
in his trap and do nothing to save them? 

President Finney 
said: "Masonic oaths are profane and 
wicked. It is a sin to take such oaths. 
This sin cannot be forgiven until it is 
repented. It is not repented until the 
oaths are renounced." 

In Christian love, fraternally yours, 
Charles A. Blanchard. 



THE LODGEMAN'S SONG. 

GEORGE A. CEEEKMORE. 
T. 

My lodge, in whose iworship my heart takes 
delight ; 

On which in affliction I call ; 
My comfort in sorrow, my song in the night, 

My master, my god and my all. 

ii. 
I have sworn by an oath, most solemn and 
strong, 
Thy secrets I'll hide them from all ; 
For thou art my hope, and the theme of my 
song, 
Dear lodge, my god and my all. 

nr. 
Come, brothers and sisters, and bow at its 
shrine; 
For the lodge is the god of us all : 
'Tis our hope of salvation, our creed, and 
our Christ ; 
Our lodge is our god and our all. 

IV. 

In sickness and sorrow, in hate and in love, 

Together we stand or we fall ; 
The lodge road we'll travel to the grand 
lodge above, 

To lodge heaven, the home of us all. 

Blackwell. Okla. 



GOSPEL-TEXT CALENDAR. 
A Beautiful Wall=CaIendar for 1909. 

H. S. Hallman, Berlin, Ontario, has 
issued a calendar, one page for each 
month, printed in different colors, con- 
taining not only the calendar for the 
month but admirably selected Scripture 
texts. He wishes agents to canvass for 
this calendar in every city throughout 
the United States, and promises that 
agents will do well in engaging with 



him. The calendar sells for 25 cents. 
Write to him for sample copy. We have 
exchanged with Mr. Hallman for ms 
Gospel Banner for many years, and can 
commend him to our readers. 



BOOK NOTICES. 

Rev. G. Lose is the author of two 
books which make interesting - reading 
for young people. "Zannie," the history 
of a young boy, can be had for 25 cenc ■;. 
The other book, "Bread Upon the 
Waters," is priced at 30 cents. These 
are intended as gift-books for the holi- 
day season. Address Lutheran Book 
Concern, 57 East Main street, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 



Among the publishers of good litera- 
ture that maintains a high standard of 
Christian living, shines the name of E. E. 
Shelhamer, of Atlanta, Georgia. One 
of his books, which we reviewed some 
years, ago, has been issued in a second 
edition. Its title is, "Rules and Helps 
to Holy Living." It is a compilation 
from such writers as John Wesley, 
Kempis, Fenelon, Jeremy Taylor, 
Madam Guyon, and others. Mr. Shel- 
hamer has also favored us with copies of 
two other books — "Experiences in Travel 
and Soul Saving" and "Pointed Bible 
Readings on Various Subjects." Of 
these he is the author as well as pub- 
lisher. Write for catalog to E. E. Shel- 
hamer, Publisher, Atlanta, Georgia. 



We have received a copy of "The 
Satan of Scripture versus the Devil of 
Christendom," by W. A. Mason, D. D. 
The table of contents includes the fol- 
lowing chapter headings: "General 
View of Satan as Presented in Scrip- 
ture," "The Present Scene of Satan's 
Activity," "Satan's Object," "Satan's 
Tactics," "Satan's Great Stratagem.' 
For sale at 15 cents, by the publisher, A. 
Sims, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. 



In the September Cynosure, page 146, 
second coiumn, line 20 should read : "Did 
you ever attend a social session of the 
Elks?" Through some mistake, the 
stenographic report read "Eagles," where 
the reference was to the Elks. 



20S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



ilem0 of §ur Porfc 

Our Imperative Needs. 



THE NATIONAL CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
work demands and merits your financial support, at least 
to the extent named below. 

$700 
$300 



for FREE LITERATURE FUND, in order to 
do as well as was done last year. 



$3 



for expenses of STATE AND NATIONAL 
CONVENTIONS. 

C(")ri is needed for 1908-1909. There were eight on 



salaries for a longer or shorter period last year 



$23,000 



is what we ask for GENERAL ENDOW- 



larger General Endowment Fund, to insure continuous 
work in times of panic and "hard times," and especially 
for enlargement of the Work of the Association. Philo 
Carpenter and others thought it ought to be at least 
$3J,0 0. The present amount is $7,000. 



POKM OF BEQUEST. 

I give, devise and bequeath unto the 'Na- 
tional Christian Association, a corporation 
created and existing under and by virtue of 
the laws of the State of Illinois, and having 
its principal office at 221 West Madison 

street, Chicago, Dollars, 

(or if lands, describe the same) to be applied 
to the uses and purposes of said Association, 
and under its direction. 

INDIANA STATE CONVENTION. 

The Annual State Convention of the 
National Christian Association in Indi- 
ana will convene at 2 p. m. November 
17th, and will close with the evening ser- 
vice of the 18th, meeting in the chapel of 
the Bible Training School, South Wayne 
Avenue, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

We are trying to make this one of the 
best conventions ever held in the State. 
We have the promise of Rev. W. B. 
Stoddard, of Washington, D. C, to be 
with us, and all who have heard him are 
anxious to do so again. 

Rev. Fitzwater, principal of the Bible 
department of Manchester College, this 
State, also has agreed to be present. We 
hope, also, to have Rev. Dr. W. H. Clay, 
of Huntington, Ind., the editor of the 
Christian Conservator, and others, who 
will do their best to make this Conven- 
tion both interesting and profitable. 

Can we not depend on your support? 
I am sure that some of God's money 
should be directed to this line of Christ- 



ian work. There are a number of neces- 
sary expenses, and there are no funds in 
the State treasury. If all will help some, 
the expenses will be easily met. Make 
your remittances payable either to Rev. 
D. Y. Schultz, Ft. Wayne, Ind., or to my- 
self, at 412 West Thirteenth St., Peru, 
Ind., and you will be duly credited for 
the same. Do not withhold because the 
amount is small ; it will help that much. 

We hope to have programs for distri- 
bution shortly and desire to send to you. 
Will the friends write me, that I may 
know who you are, and where. 

Then do not fail to be present, not only 
to swell the crowd, but to receive benefit ; 
and be prepared to carry the truth to oth- 
ers, who are needy as you once were. 

L. G. Bears, 

President Indiana State Association. 
Peru, Ind., Oct. 15, 1908. 



TWO GREAT CONVENTIONS. 

It is common to measure things in this 
world by numbers, noise, and the like. 
The Conventions which I have in mind 
were not great in these particulars. They 
were great in the subjects with which 
they dealt, and in the devotion, faith, and 
courage of the people who composed 
them. Numerically they were not large. 
The maximum attendance at any one ses- 
sion of the Iowa Convention, I do not 
think would exceed four hundred. The 
largest audience at the Michigan Con- 
vention was not more than one hundred 
and twenty-five. The day sessions were 
much smaller than these two figures. But 
in both of these Conventions men and 
women were conferring about the best 
means of pulling down the Kingdom of 
Satan in this world, and planting the 
Church of Jesus Christ in the ground 
which the great destroyer and deceiver 
has usurped. 

Satan claimed, even to our Lord Jesus 
Christ Himself, that the authority of this 
world had been delivered to him ; but our 
Lord never admitted this claim, and in 
a thousand ways showed that it was 
false. Jesus had power over the winds, 
power over the waves, power over sick- 
ness, power over death. 

The Iowa Convention was held in the 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



209 



buildings of the Holiness Association of 
that State; one day's sessions in the Cen- 
tral Holiness University, the others in the 
City Chapel of the same organization. 

The ministers, the teachers, and stu- 
dents, whom I met, were delightful 
Christian people, enlisted for the war. It 
was good to hear them sing and pray and 
witness. It is a sign of the times that 
people are seeking to walk closely with 
God. 

In Michigan the meetings were held 
in one of the Christian . Reformed 
churches of Grand Rapids. Some years 
since we held meetings in the same 
church. The pastor and people are a de- 
lightful Christian community. 

I did not have opportunity to meet all 
of the brethren in either Convention ; for, 
occurring as they did, in the same week, 
I had to leave one in order to reach the 
other, and to cut out a portion from each ; 
but the spirit was good. 

Brother Pegram is doing well for the 
Michigan Association. I wish the friends 
there would co-operate with him very 
earnestly to make the present year's work 
greater and better than all that has here- 
tofore been. The great need in Iowa is 
for the labor of a similar man ; and the 
need of Iowa is the need of many other 
States. Let us pray, therefore, the Lord 
of the harvest that He thrust forth work- 
ers into His harvest. 

Charles A. Blanchard. 



THE IOWA STATE CONVENTION. 

The Iowa State Convention of the Na- 
tional Christian Association met at Oska- 
loosa, Iowa, October 3-6, 1908. 

Dr. Charles A. Blanchard, President of 
the National Christian Association, spoke 
on Saturday evening, October 3d, in the 
auditorium of the Central Holiness Uni- 
versity, his subject being "Life's Best 
Things." On Sunday morning, October 
4th, he spoke at the Congregational 
church on "How Jesus Prayed;" and 
Sunday afternoon, at the Y. M. C. A., 
on "Power to Be the Sons of God." Sun- 
day evening he spoke at Central Holiness 
University, on "Search the Scriptures." 
We believe that by the help of God great 
results will come from this Sabbath at 
Oskaloosa. 



The Monday morning session of the 
Convention was devoted to prayer, 
praise, and testimony. The afternoon ses- 
sion began at 1 130 o'clock, at the univer- 
sity auditorium. After singing "Holy 
Spirit, Faithful Guide," Professor B. W. 
Ayres, Acting President of the univer- 
sity, gave his Address of Welcome. Both 
personally and as a representative of the 
university he gave the Convention the 
most hearty welcome. In his response, 
Rev. J. S. McGaw, President of the Iowa 
Christian Association, expressed the ap- 
preciation of the Convention for such a 
welcome. After a short season of prayer, 
led by William P. Sopher, Dr. Blanchard 
spoke with great power, his subject being 
"Plants Which God Did Not Plant." 
Our brother has great faith in the victory 
against secrecy. Abraham Lincoln de- 
clared it would take two hundred years 
to abolish slavery, but only five years 
later he wrote the Emancipation Procla- 
mation. 

Tuesday morning the Convention met 
at 9 o'clock in the Pentecostal Mission 
church. The session was opened by 
prayer. 

Letters to the Convention were read 
from Rev. J. G. Rugland, Saude, Iowa; 
Rev. H. P. Gray, Russell, Minn. ; E. J. 
Claussen, Sutherland, Iowa; Cyrus 
Smith, Leon, Iowa ; Alvin Hoskins, 
Greenville, Iowa; Mrs. Jennettie Siemil- 
ler. Blockton, Iowa; A. J. Millard, Little 
Rock, Ark. 

The committee on Plan of Work re- 
ported, and it was carried that the Execu- 
tive Board should arrange for antisecret 
lecturing in the State, and that Rev. J. 
S. McGaw and others whom the com- 
mittee may see fit be engaged in this 
work. 

The report of the nominating commit- 
tee was read and adopted, as follows : 

President — Prof. B. W. Ayres, acting 
President of the Central Holiness Uni- 
versity, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Vice-Presidents — Rev. J. W. Leedy, 
Oskaloosa; Rev. T. S. McGaw. Morning 
Sun, R. F. D. ; Rev. C. D. Trumbull, 
D. D., Morning Sun ; Wm. Crosson, J. A. 
Fenwick, Oskaloosa; W. P. Sopher, Os- 
kaloosa, R. F. D. ; Prof. George Shaw. 
B. D, Oskaloosa. 



210 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



Secretary — Rev. John Nelson, 909 
Lyon street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Treasurer — A. Branson, 616 North C 
street, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

The following resolutions were adopt- 
ed: 

Whereas, The secret-society system 
continues to menace the church and hin- 
der the progress of the Kingdom of 
Christ; therefore 

Resolved, That we, as an anti-secrecy 
organization, enter upon the work of the 
coming year with renewed energy and 
enthusiasm. 

2. That we urge upon ministers the 
duty of declaring the whole counsel of 
God on this subject to their people. 

3. That we invite to membership and 
co-operation all people, both men and 
women, who believe that the secret so- 
ciety is an evil. 

4. Resolved, That we extend to the trus- 
tees of Central Holiness University, and 
to the Trustees of Pentecostal Mission, a 
hearty vote of thanks for the use of their 
buildings for this Convention. 

5. Resolved, That we extend to the 
Faculty of Music of Central Holiness 
University, and the students who assist- 
ed them, hearty thanks for the excellent 
music furnished. 

Rev. John Nelson gave an address, his 
subject being, "The Pastor and the 
Lodge." In the afternoon Dr. C. D. 
Trumbull gave a splendid address. 

John Nelson, Secretary. 



ADDRESS TO PEOPLE OF IOWA. 
From Committee of Iowa State Christian 
Association, in Annual Meeting As= 
sembled. 

Fathers, Brothers and Friends : The 
Iowa State Christian Association, assem- 
bled in annual convention in the city of 
Oskaloosa, once more sends you fraternal 
greeting. 

During the year much has passed since 
our meeting at Des Moines. The work 
of our association has continued, though 
in a less powerful and effective manner 
than we could wish. The importance of 
the cause demands the employment of 
secretaries who shall give their entire en- 



ergies to the dissemination of the truth 
regarding secret associations. 

No Argument for Lodges. 

That no valid argument for secret as- 
sociations is possible has been evident 
from the days of Daniel Webster, Wm. 
H. Seward, Millard Fillmore, John Quin- 
cy Adams, John Marshall, Richard Rush 
and their co-laborers. Until this hour no 
reply has been made to the indictments 
of the lodge. It has been affirmed, nay, it 
has been proved, that secret associations 
are essentially evil. It has been shown 
that the crimes which they have commit- 
ted against men, the church and the state 
have not resulted from the presence of 
certain evil men connected with them, but 
arise from the very constitution of the 
orders. 

Secret Societies Essentially Evil. 

When we see the "Mollie Maguires" 
killing scores of people in Pennsylvania, 
the Federation of Miners killing scores 
of people in Colorado, college fraternities 
and even high school fraternities killing 
boys and young men in their senseless 
initiations, we are told that these disas- 
ters result from the presence of reckless 
or abandoned men in the orders. But 
events are showing that these results, 
with the awful demoralization which pre- 
cedes, attends and follows, are the out- 
come of the secret society system. The 
very fact that men are united in a secret 
organization tends to make them crimi- 
nals. Honest men do not need secret 
combinations. Reckless and wicked men 
can always use them for accomplishing 
their purposes. The system should not 
be mended by improvement in member- 
ship. It should be ended by abolition. 

Signs of Hope. 

There are a number of encouragements 
to a continued protest against this whole 
secret society system. The revelations of 
unlawful transactions in the business and 
political world confirm the saying of our 
Savior that there is nothing secret which 
shall not be known and come abroad. 
Conscientious men who have been trap- 
ped into membership in orders of one 
kind and another are continually aban- 
doning them. Many who have been led 
out of them, and who have considered 
their oaths to secrecy binding, have been 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



211 



set free and are speaking the truth with- 
out hesitation. The revised ritual of the 
Odd Fellows' lodges is in print and on 
the market. The Masonic rituals have 
not been materially changed, and every- 
one who wills may know the inner work- 
ings of this great enemy of the human 
race. The movement in boards of edu- 
cation, state legislature, and court, circuit 
and supreme, against the high school fra- 
ternities, continues and always works out 
one way. There is practically no dissent 
from the proposition that secret societies 
in public schools are hot-beds of immor- 
ality and rebellion. So far as we are in- 
formed there has not yet been one court 
which has disputed the right of boards 
of education to exterminate these pests. 
The Position of the Church. 
We would gladly make a more favora- 
ble report of the position of the churches 
on this subject than we are aole to pre- 
sent. Churches which are afraid of or in 
friendship with the world do not oppose 
fraternities any more than they do Sab- 
bath-breaking, worldly amusements, 
business dishonesties or political corrup- 
tion. But it. is our judgment that on the 
part of all live Christian organizations 
there is a great disposition to bear testi- 
mony respecting this subject. Godly men 
by scores and hundreds are abandoning 
the lodge in every part of our country, 
not so freely as they ought, possibly, but 
more freely than has sometimes been the 
case. They are warning their fellows 
against these snares, traps and pitfalls of 
the enemy. So far as we can understand 
there is a growing indisposition on the 
part of Christian men to enter such or- 
ganizations. The lodges are initiating 
thousands of men every year, but these 
men are not usually those who attend the 
church. They are not generally men of 
large business power. They are politi- 
cians, loafers, men who do not care much 
for their homes. Exceptions, of course, 
there are, but that this is the general 
character of the new members of lodges 
in our time we believe to be the case. Of 
course such persons will not materially 
strengthen the lodges. They are not in 
them for what they can do, but for what 
they can get. Such men are a load to be 
carried, not a power to move. 



The Real Source of Victory. 

But we do not rely upon the testimo- 
nials of even good men, nor upon the 
weakness of evil men. Secret societies 
will be destroyed because they belong to 
the kingdom of Satan and antagonize the 
kingdom of God. Jesus Christ must 
reign until every enemy is under his feet. 
This is the declaration of God's word ; it 
is confirmed by the history of the human 
race. There are many signs which lead 
us to hope that the day of His completed 
triumph is near at hand. He will turn 
and overturn until He reigns in right- 
eousness. All secret orders belong to the 
kingdom of darkness. All secret orders 
are built upon selfishness. All secret or- 
ders involve distrust of God and reliance 
upon human aids. All secret orders, 
whatever may be their pretended pur- 
poses, are necessary for no good end, and 
are capable of being used for any evil 
purpose whatsoever. They rival and de- 
stroy the churches. They corrupt and de- 
stroy courts and legislatures. They are 
essentially anarchistic in character. 
No man who is not an infidel can believe 
that such a system is to continue in this 
world. We therefore bid you be of good 
courage. We urge you to more continual 
and impressive testimony. We pray you 
to use the printed page and the spoken 
word more freely than ever before. Do 
not assume that your enemy is invincible. 
Even to-day he trembles at the thought of 
his coming doom. Be of good courage 
and God will strengthen your hearts, and 
you shall see in the near future the de- 
struction of all anti-Christs and the com- 
plete victory and the glorious coronation 
of our King. 



IOWA TREASURER'S REPORT. 
Rendered October 6, 1908. 

Balance from last year, $16.93 i receiv- 
ed from A. Millet, $1 ; Mrs. J. Sierm'ler, 
$5 ; W. M. Mathews, $4 ; George Berry, 
$2 ; Mrs. J. R. Johnson, $1 ; collection 
per Rev. Van der Ark, $15; collection 
per Rev. Canthers, $12.61 ; collection per 
Rev. Hanslegh, $9.50 ; two collections at 
Convention, $8.48 ; memberships. $2 ; to- 
tal, §77-52. 

Paid speakers, $31.25 ; expenses of Ex- 



21S 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



ecutive Committee, $5 ; other expenses, 
60c ; programs and postage, $6.20 ; print- 
ing Convention letters, $1.50; balance in 
treasury, $32.97 ; total, $77-5 2 - 

A. Branson, Treasurer. 



Oskaloosa, Iowa, October 7, 1908. 
W. I. Phillips, Chicago: 

Dear Friend — The Convention closed 
last evening at 4 o'clock. It was a grand 
success for the cause. Attendance was 
large, both evenings, and a wonderful 
interest was manifested throughout. We 
could hardly close the Convention, but 
were obliged to because Rev. J. S. Mc- 
Gaw and Rev. C. D. Trumbull had to 
leave on the 4:10 train. 

President Blanchard delivered seven 
addresses while here and was somewhat 
worn out, but all of his words were ea- 
gerly listened to, and eternity alone can 
tell the great good which has been done 
by the Convention this year. I feel well 
repaid and happy this morning for all 
the time and effort that I have put into 
it to help to a successful issue. The cause 
has been greatly advanced. The Press 
was very liberal in printing our programs 
and printing notes of the Convention. 
In haste, yoUrs for the truth, 

A. Branson. 



Morning Sun, Iowa, Oct. 19, 1908. 
i Editor Cynosure: I was not present at 

J-tne^ meetings on October 4th, and. the 
morning of October 5th, but was present 

"at all the other sessions. There are at 
tjiis'time over three hundred students in 
attendance at the University. Probably 
one hundred of these, with their instruct- 
ors, and a few other persons were -in at- 
tendance the afternoon of the 5th. The 
attendance was somewhat larger in the 
evening. All seemed deeply interested in 
the addresses ; and well they might be, for 
they were of a high order. 

B. W. Ayres, Acting President, extend- 
ed a hearty welcome to the Convention, 
making us to realize that we were among 
friends. Rev. J . S. McGaw responded in 
happy terms. The address of President 
Blanchard on "Plants Which God Did 
Not Plant," was in his usual happy vein 
and was calculated to carry conviction to 
any unbiased mind. The evening ad- 



dress of Rev. J. S. McGaw set forth rea- 
sons for separation from secret orders. 
It was delivered with much earnestness 
and was well received. This was fol- 
lowed by an interesting talk by Prof. 
Shaw, of the University, who gave his 
experience as a pastor of churches more 
or less dominated by secret orders. 

The sessions of October 6th were in 
the Pentecostal Mission church and were 
slimly attended; there being not more 
than twenty persons present at either ses- 
sion. Those present were of the tried 
and true friends of the cause, so that the 
meetings did not lack interest. The Rev. 
John Nelson delivered an able address, 
which was requested for publication- in 
the Cynosure. The only other address 
was by the writer. 

(Rev.) C. D. Trumbull. 



REPORT OF MICHIGAN CONVENTION. 

Editor Cynosure: The Annual Con- 
vention of the Michigan Christian Asso- 
ciation, opposed to secret societies, held 
in the Lagrave Street Christian Reform- 
ed church, Grand Rapids, October 7th 
and 8th, was surely a record-breaking 
meeting. In point of interest, the num- 
ber in attendance, and the number of de- 
nominations represented, it excelled any 
other held in recent years: All the speak- 
ers announced were present" except two. 
And all present evidenced careful prepa- 
ration of the subjects presented. 

Wednesday afternoon, the President, 
Rev. J. W. Brink, called the Convention 
to order. The pastor of the Lagrave 
Street church, Rev. Henry Beets, con- 
ducted the devotional exercises. 

Representatives were present from the 
Wesleyan Methodist, Free Methodist, 
Methodist Episcopal, United Brethren, 
and Christian Reformed churches, the 
Salvation Army, and the ' Pentecostal 
Church of the Nazarene. One from each 
denomination was appointed to report the 
convention to their respective church 
papers. Committees on State work, nom- 
inations, finance and resolutions were 
appointed. Addresses were delivered by 
H. A. Day, J. W. Brink, J. L. Van Tie- 
len, S, A. Manwell, G. A. Pegram, I. 
Groen, and C. A. Blanchard, all of 
'which were excellent and worthy of much 



November, 1908. 



CHLUST1AN CYNOSURE. 



21.°» 






larger audiences. It was very evident 
that there is a growing interest, in anti- 
secret work in the State of Michigan. 

It was decided by the Convention to 
ask every church favoring antisecret 
work to contribute at least $5 per year 
to the cause, and also to have each pas- 
tor preach at least one sermon annually 
on the subject. 

An invitation to hold the next Annual 
Convention in the United Brethren 
church at Alma, Michigan, was accepted 
by the Convention. 

The State officers elected for this year 
are : 

President—Rev. J. W. Brink, 155 Ter- 
race st., Muskegon. 

Vice-President — Rev. A. B. Bowman, 
Aima. 

Secretary — Rev. A. R. Merrill, 64 
West 9th st., Holland. 

Treasurer — Rev. H. Voorhess, Flint. - 

State Agent and Lecturer — Rev. G. 
A. Pegram, Elkton. 

Revs. G. A. Pegram, J. A. Watson, E. 
E. Wood, A. B. Bowman, H. A. Day, 
J. Groen, together with the officers, were 
constituted the Executive Committee. 

The Treasurer's book shows total re- 
ceipts of $71.00, with disbursements of 
$56.00. Balance on hand, $15.00. 

This year's work was better than that 
of the year before. But we must go for- 
ward, not backward. 

First, Let every A^tichigan reader of 
the Cynosure pray every day for this 
cause. 

Second, Let every one of us become a 
member of the Michigan Christian Asso- 
ciation and send the annual fee, $1.00, to 
either the Secretary or Treasurer. 

Third, Let us all, who belong to anti- 
secret churches, see that our churches 
send at least $5.00 to the Treasurer of 
the Michigan Christian Association, and 
then let each church arrange with the 
State Lecturer for at least one lecture. 

This can all be done with a little effort. 

Yours for victory, 

A. R. Merrill, Secretary. 

October 16, 1908. 



THE MICHIGAN ANTI-SECRET- 
SOCIETY CONVENTION. 
Held October 7 and 8 in Grand Rapids. 

^ It was several years ago that a State 
Convention under the auspices of the 
National Christian Association (against 
secret, oath-bound societies) was held 
in the Lagrave Street church of Grand 
Rapids. At that time Rev. Stoddard and 
President Blanchard spoke to a well-filled 
church, as well as Rev. Thomas M. 
Chalmers of the U. P. Jewish mission in 
Chicago. Then also, we think, the Mich- 
igan State Association was formed. 

Since then annual meetings have been 
held in various parts of the State, and 
this year, October 7th and 8th, Grand 
Rapids and the Lagrave Street church 
once more was the place of meeting. 

Wednesday afternoon the Rev. J. W. 
Brink, the State President, called the 
meeting to order with a few appropriate 
remarks. The local pastor then led the 
devotional exercises. 



♦ 



* 



"Many a criminal never would have 
gone to jail, if the flowers had been 
taken to him sooner." 



Rev. H. A. Day of Hickory Corners, 
formerly of Grand Rapids, delivered an 
address. 

Wednesday evening the Rev. J. W. 
Brink read a strong paper on "High 
School Fraternities." It showed a great 
effort on the part of Rev. Brink to pro- 
cure unbiased opinions from educational 
leaders. And nearly every one of these 
testimonies condemned the High School 
"frats" and sororities as detrimental in- 
stitutions, fostering an un-American, un- 
democratic class spirit, and promoting 
offensive snobbishness. The paper was 
long, rather too long, but it was strong 
and convincing. 

Thursday morning reports were read 
and testimony given about the evil re- 
sults of secret societies. Some of these 
testimonies were very touching and con- 
vincing and showed very plainly that all 
who love vital religion and care for the 
true welfare of their soul should re- 
frain from joining organizations of this 
kind. 

The "Grange" was also condemned. 

During the afternoon meeting of 
Thursday, Rev. Pegram spoke on 
"Oaths." And he did it well. 

Two addresses were delivered during 



214 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



the closing session of Thursday night. 

Rev. J. Groen spoke in the Holland 
language, and he did it forcefully and 
convincingly, like we are accustomed 
from him. ''The Secret Societies an Or- 
ganized Power Arrayed Against the 
Kingdom of God" was his subject. 

He spoke of how Christ had created 
our race as a unity, how sin had broken 
up this oneness, but how the grace of 
God and His Christ endeavors to restore 
this. Common grace is constantly oper- 
ating to bring this about. But Satan, 
who destroyed the union between heaven 
and earth, is angered at this reorganizing 
work of God. And to frustrate God's at- 
tempts he also organizes his forces, there- 
by imitating the Christ of God, like 
Luther already called the devil "the ape" 
of Christ. 

Now, whenever organizations appear 
in this world the question arises : On 
what side do they stand, to what king- 
dom do they belong? To God's or to 
that of darkness ? 

Next the question was debated: To 
what kingdom does the lodge belong? 
Plainly — to that of the kingdom of dark- 
ness. 

The speaker showed this by pointing to 
the following facts: 

i. The name of Christ is omitted from 
nearly all lodge prayers, and in many of 
them omitted on purpose. 

2. A self-appointed religion is placed 
beside and above the one revealed in 
Holy Writ. 

3. Its promises of unconditional se- 
crecy suggest works of darkness. 

4. The unity of the human race is 
broken and class spirit is advanced by 
secret societies. 

5. These organizations do not supply 
one need which existing bodies, church 
and state, cannot supply. 

6. Many of its festivities and cere- 
monies are sinful and heathenish. 

Rev. Dr. Blanchard, President of 
Wheaton College, Illinois, and President 
of the National Christian Association, 
was the last speaker. In his usual inter- 
esting way he discoursed on "The Duty 
of the Hour Regarding Secret Societies." 

This duty, he stated, consisted of a 
close study of them. And if studied 
properly it would become evident that 



such organizations are at heart enemies 
to the three God-ordained human insti- 
tutions: the family, the state and the 
church. Many illustrations, some of 
them very forceful, and all of them 
taken from practical life, proved his con- 
tentions. 

This evening meeting was the best of 
the series of meetings held. It was also 
the best attended. Although that, alas! 
does not say much. All told, there were 
only 120 persons present! What a dis- 
appointment ! 

But a handful of our church members 
appeared at any of the meetings. Only 
a very few of our pastors. Still less 
of our professors. The students of our 
school were the best represented — al- 
though their numbers also were not 
large. Some of the meetings held dur- 
ing the day were exceedingly poorly at- 
tended. We are sorry to be obliged to 
record this. 

A few years ago, the meetings of this 
kind were finely attended. This year the 
speakers were equally good. The cause 
of secret societies is equally strong and 
calls for continued, yea, increasing oppo- 
sition. 

Grand Rapids brethren and brethren of 
the Colony — you did not do well in thus 
holding aloof, but rather hurt a good and 
necessary cause! 

The N. C. A. has proved a valuable 
and indispensable ally in our warfare 
against secret societies. Without it we 
would be soldiers practically without 
weapons and munitions of war. Up, 
then, and let us be doing to support it 
better than ever. More collections, sent 
in regularly, as Synod appointed. More 
Cynosure subscriptions to support that 
monthly and encourage Rev. W. I. Phil- 
lips, the editor, 221 W. Madison street, 
Chicago, 111. It is with pleasure, and ow- 
ing to the Cynosure's- courtesy, that we 
present Rev. Dr. C. A. Blanchard's pic- 
ture and that of Rev. G. A. Pegram, the 
Michigan State Agent and Lecturer. 
This latter brother labors in our State 
for but comparatively little recompense. 
This year his total income amounted to 
less than $400. No wonder. The whole 
State brought only $32.00 in annual sub- 
scriptions of $1.00. 

What a pity such a cause should go 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



215 



a-begging, where less worthy and less 
needful matters always get what they 
want! — The Banner, Grand Rapids, 
Mich. 



NEW YORK=NEW JERSEY CONVENTION 
Condensed Minutes. 

The New York and New Jersey Con- 
vention (of the National Christian Asso- 
ciation) met Monday and Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 19th and 20th, in the North Side 
Christian Reformed church, Passaic, N. 
J. The Convention opened Monday 
evening. A cordial welcome was given 
by Rev. A. T. Van den Heuvel, the pastor 
of the church in which the Convention 
gathered. Rev. F. M. Foster, Ph. D., of 
New York City, , as president of the As- 
sociation, responded in well-chosen 
words. He spoke of the unpopularity of 
the antisecrecy reform and the popular- 
ity of the lodges. Multitudes are being 
led into lodge traps. The question, Why 
do men go into the dark lodges, was 
asked and answered. Men hope to gain 
something that they could not gain hon- 
estly, by their own exertions and merits. 
Fuss and feathers appeal to some; the 
supposed secrets, to others; help of one 
kind or another attracts still others. But 
above all, men are held in lodge bonds 
because Satan is at the bottom of it. 
Three reasons were given against joining 
the lodges : The initiation ceremonies are 
degrading; the lodge religion is without 
the true God and without Christ; the 
lodge oaths are blasphemous and contrary 
to the Word of God. 

Rev. P. Jonker, pastor of the Prospect 
Park Christian Reformed church, gave 
an address in the Holland language, 
"Why Oppose Secret Societies?" in which 
he gave many reasons in answer to this 
question. 

Tuesday forenoon was largely devoted 
to business. The following officers were 
ueuecl c 1 * the ensuing year: 

Officers for 1908=1909. 

President— Rev. F. M. Foster, Ph. D., 
345 West 29th st.. New York City. 

1st Vice-President — Rev. D. Vander 
Ploeg, 47 Flope av., Passaic, N. J. 

2nd Vice-President — Rev. K. F. Ohl- 
son, 140 East 50th St., New York City. 

3rd Vice-President — Rev. O. V. Ke- 
tels, . 



Secretary — Rev. G. Westenberg, 129 
Fourth av., Paterson, N. J. 

Treasurer — Rev. James Parker, Ph. 
D., 341 Webster av., Jersey City, N. J. 

A report regarding the progress of the 
work was read. It was full of encour- 
agement, and reminded of the glorious 
truth that if we keep looking to God we 
will be victorious, in spite of the general 
lack of interest in this work, which is 
very obvious. The subject of how to 
procure a greater attendance at Conven- 
tions was discussed, several persons par- 
ticipating, among them Rev. James P. 
Stoddard, of Boston, who from his ex- 
tensive experience thought that the best 
way of creating interest would be to 
spread the matter before the prayer-meet- 
ings. Dr. Foster extended the invitation 
of his church to hold the next year's Con- 
vention there. 

A very interesting part of the program 
of Tuesday morning was the Seceders' 
Testimony service. Mr. Charles A. Lag- 
ville, of Corona, N. Y., told how he for 
many years had been a Freemason and 
had held all the offices in that lodge ex- 
cept that of Worshipful Master. He had 
thought the Masonic lodge a very grand 
thing, until he came to know Christ and 
to see what He had done for us. He 
then left the lodge, where they had no 
Christ, and was greatly blessed in his de- 
liverance. Mr. Joseph F. Eberhard, of 
East Orange, N. J., also gave his testi- 
mony, which was similar to the preceding 
one and supported the statement that the 
lodge system is evil and a great obstacle 
in Christian development. 

Letters from the following persons 
were read before the Convention : Dr. 
Charles A. Blanchard, president of the 
National Christian Association ; J. C. Da- 
vis, New York; L. M. Thompson, of 
Brooklyn ; H. R. Smith, Jr., of Hough- 
ton, N. Y. ; Stephen Higginson, of Ea- 
tontown, N. J. ; L. Woodruff, of Bing- 
hamton, N. Y. ; Mrs. Rose N. McConnell. 
of Mayville, N. Y. ; M. T. Lindsay, of 
Brooklyn ; Rev. H. L. Crockett, of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y. ; H. Schopfe, Union Hill, 
N.J. 

In the Conference of Denominations, 
on Tuesday afternoon, Rev. J. C. Slater, 
of the Covenanter church, spoke of the 
attitude and work of that body in regard 



21G 



CHRISTIAN GYNOSUKE. 



November, 1908. 



to lodges. He said a church may assume 
one of three attitudes as to secret organi- 
zations: first, that of approval ; second, 
that of indifference in the matter of sep- 
arating the church from rival organiza- 
tions ; third, that of antagonism in creed 
and practice. The last is the attitude of 
the Covenanter church. Each member of 
that church subscribes to the absolute ex- 
clusion of all secret orders from the 
church. The church exalts Christ as su- 
preme in every department of life, nat- 
ural and spiritual. 

The Wesleyan Methodist church was 
represented by a letter which stated 
that this church will not allow her mem- 
bers to hold membership in any of the 
secret orders. By joining such an order 
a person thereby forfeits membership in 
the church. 

The position of the Christian Reform- 
ed church was presented in a few well- 
chosen words by the pastor of the church 
in which the Convention met. Brother 
Van den Heuvel thought the greatest 
danger from secret societies was with 
their young people, who are gradually be- 
coming Americanized, he said. 

Rev. H. F. R. Steckholtz spoke of the 
stand of the Missouri Lutheran synod 
(German) . He stated that this body can- 
not have any members of secret societies 
in her membership, for many Biblical 
reasons which he clearly set forth. None 
of the 2,600 ministers of this synod are 
members of any lodge, as far as known. 

Rev. J. P. Stoddard spoke for the Uni- 
ted Presbyterian church, of which he has 
recently become a member. He left the 
Congregational church because a pastor 
was chosen who had been a Freemason 
for many years, and he (Mr. Stoddard) 
could not go back on his principles 
against the Lodge in his old age. He 
said he was happy to say now that he is a 
member of a church that is opposed to 
all lodges. 

Rev. T. F. Nordberg represented the 
Swedish Congregational church, _ which 
aiso opposes the Lodge. He said the 
Swedish people in general were not in- 
clined toward the secret orders, and that 
his church would be loyal to the princi- 
ples of the teaching of Scripture in gen- 
eral. 



Dr. James Parker, who came in during 
the course of this conference of denomi- 
nations, spoke of the attitude of the Uni- 
ted Presbyterian church. That church 
holds that Christians ought not to be 
members of secret, oath-bound societies. 
Brother Parker thought the main point 
that should be pressed by the church is 
the deity of Jesus Christ. All lodges are 
opposed to just this point. Masonry 
teaches that a man is saved by a clean life 
and by obeying the precepts of the Lodge. 
Dr. Parker said that so far as he knew 
there was not a minister in the United 
Presbyterian church who was a member 
of any of these lodges. That church has 
one rule for both ministers and lay mem- 
bers. He admitted that the doors had 
been swung open to lodge-members by 
some ministers, in their zeal to get new 
members for their churches. But gener- 
ally speaking the church is practically 
and comparatively free from Christ-re- 
jecting orders. 

Resolutions were adopted, condemning 
the lodges and deploring their evil effects, 
religiously, socially, and politically, and 
pledging" diligence in opposing them. The 
general condemnation of secret fraterni- 
ties in public schools was noted, with 
rejoicing, and the belief expressed that 
the same arguments for their destruction 
apply with equal force to the lodges for 
older people. Appreciation was express- 
ed of the assistance of the pastor and 
people of the North Side Christian Re- 
formed church, and to the musicians who 
contributed to the success of the Conven- 
tion. On Tuesday evening Rev. J. S. 
Thompson, of Beaver Falls, Pa., gave an 
address — "On Which Side of the Lodge 
Door Should the Young Man Be 
Found ?" He presented first the teaching 
of the Bible, and second, the testimony of 
those who have left and exposed the 
Lodge. A large number of excellent rea- 
sons were given why young men should 
remain outside the Lodge. 

A collection for the National Christian 
Association was taken. 

Rev. James P. Stoddard spoke on the 
subject, "Does the Lodge Seek Control 
of Church and State?" He used charts 
in developing his subject, and showed 
that the Lodge is seeking such control. 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



217 



\yr.T. 



A GOOD RECORD. 
W. B. Stoddard's Report for October. 

Passac, N. J., Oct. 17, 1908. 
Dear Cynosure: — My record for an- 
other month has been made. God has 
given health and I have been stirring as 
usual. 

A noon meeting at a tile factory in 
Delaware, Ohio, gave opportunity to pre- 
sent truth to some needy ones. The 
theme was the divine brotherhood. This, 
of course, differs from that of the Lodge. 

While passing a house I handed an 
elderly man a tract and told him I was 
working against the lodges. He replied, 
"I admire your spunk. This town is 
full of lodges. The college professors 
who belong to the Greek-letter fraterni- 
ties have to keep quiet when the boys 
steal pigs and eat them in their chapter 
houses. Some of the students board with 
me, and I know what I am talking 
about." Is not the "partaker as bad as 
the thief?" Would it not be well for the 
parents of these pig-stealing lodge boys 
to make inquiry as to their lodge educa- 
tion? 

Friends were visited at Reynoldsburg 
and New Concord, Ohio. At the Bloom- 
iield United Presbyterian church I found 
those who welcomed the reform message 
and contributed in support of our work. 
Pastor and people are loyal along re- 
form lines. The United Presbyterian col- 
lege at New Concord opened with quite 
an increase in the student body. Pros- 
pects were never so bright. The presi- 
dent is a hard worker. He reported the 
needed $100,000 endowment nearly se- 
cured. At his request your Agent ad- 
dressed the students during their morn- 
ing devotions. I was glad to meet our 
many friends at this place, but especial- 
ly a retired minister in whose church 
I spoke some twenty years ago. He told 
of a young man who was about to marry 
one of the young ladies of his congre- 
gation. Prior to my visit the young man 
had thought favorably of uniting with 
the Masonic" lodge and going to another 
church. He said it was my lecture that 
caused the young man to give up the idea 
of joining the Masons. He is now an 
officer in the church (United Presbyte- 



rian) and both he and his excellent wife 
are doing much in its support. It is al- 
ways cheering to know that God blesses 
His truth to the salvation of some: 

In a visit near Grantsville, Maryland, I 
found some of our friends harvesting a 
large, fine apple crop. My support was 
what was expected. 

A short-notice meeting in the Mennon-' 
ite church at Springs, Pa., gave oppor- 
tunity to present truth to the hundred or 
more who were gathered. Oh, the beau- 
ties and freedom of this mountainous 
country ! 

The severest storm and rain of the 
season came to Washington, D. C, Sep- 
tember 28th, just at the time announced 
for my lecture in the church of the 
Brethren. A brief talk was given to the 
few who braved the storm. I hope to 
try again later. 

I reached New York City the first day 
of this month, and have worked in this 
vicinity ever since. I find the means of 
transportation about New York become 
easier and faster every year. By way 
of tunnels we fly under the rivers. As 
the man described it, "They put you into 
sort of car gun, shoot it off, and there 
you are!" Hundreds of thousands travel 
through these tunnels every day. 

A Sabbath at Corona, L. I., afforded 
another delightful visit, and opportunity 
to speak to friends in the Swedish Con- 
gregational and Union churches. Min- 
isterial gatherings of Swedish Congrega- 
tional and Missouri Synod Lutheran pas- 
tors in Brooklyn and New York were ad- 
dressed in the interest of the Conven- 
tion meeting in Passaic, the 19th and 
20th. 

A church of our Christian Reformed 
friends at West Sayville, L. I., greeted 
me with a full house, and gave a collec- 
tion of $8.65 to the cause. A collector 
reported that some lodge people contrib- 
uted. Let us hope they were converted. 
I was sorry I could not tarry to enjoy the 
good things found at this noted fishing 
center. 

Our Free Methodist friends at New- 
ark, N. J., were cordial as ever. Ad- 
dresses to the children and a sermon to 
those older was there given, in return for 
much kindness. The Bethany Presbyte- 



218 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



rian pastor hopes to arrange for me to 
address his people. 

Most of the time for the prayer meet- 
ing last Wednesday evening was given 
to your Agent in the Second Christian 
Reformed church, Paterson, N. J. Our 
friends there always make me welcome 
and contribute to meet my need. 

A good program is prepared and much 
work has been done in the interest of 
the New York and New Jersey Conven- 
tion, which gathers here next Monday 
and Tuesday. I have sought to do my 
part, and I have no doubt God will do 
His. Were there time for details, I could 
write of some hindrances, but there is 
much to encourage. 

Next Wednesday evening I am an- 
nounced to lecture for a Lutheran pastor 
at Grantwood, N. J., who is having trou- 
ble with the lodge people. On Thursday 
evening I hope to speak to the young 
people of the Swedish Congregational 
church, Fiftieth street, New York City. 
Friday evening goes to the Fourth Chris- 
tian Reformed church of Paterson, 
N.J., if expected arrangements are made. 
On October 27th I lecture, D. V., in the 
Lutheran church in Washington, D. C, 
of which Rev. Doermann is pastor. Pas- 
tor Doermann is president of a district 
synod of the Joint Synod of Ohio. I 
shall likely be in Western Ohio or Indi- 
ana by the time this letter is read by 
Cynosure friends. My appointments for 
to-morrow (Sabbath) are in the three 
Christian Reformed churches of this city. 

Let us remember that, while the battle 
is the Lord's, He uses those of us who 
are willing to work. W. B. Stoddard. 



New York, Oct. 21, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure : Just a line to let 
friends know that another successful! 
Convention has been held. The attend- 
ance was not large, but representative. 
The addresses were of a high order and 
well received. Some of us wanted to 
tell the whole story at once, and so took 
more than our share of the time. Much 
good seed was sown. Contributions met 
the financial needs and left a small bal- 
ance in the treasury. The minutes will 
give details. Truly, 

W. B. Stoddard. 



MICHIGAN STATE AGENT. 

Spring Arbor, Mich., Oct. 19, 1908. 

Dear Cynosure: After my last letter 
I remained at Grand Rapids, advertis- 
ing and preparing for the State Conven- 
tion. 

On September 19th I addressed ' the 
"Convocation of Prayer" on "The Rela- 
tion of Lodges to Revivals," showing 
how they always hinder and never help. 
Man)- a revival has been hindered, and 
some have been prevented altogether, by 
the fact that church members attended 
lodge meetings instead of church meet- 
ings. 

During this "Convocation of Prayer" 
I had the privilege of addressing the men 
at three different factories in the city of 
Grand Rapids, — some of them several 
times. These men usually listened with 
the greatest interest, respect, and atten- 
tion. 

On September 23d I spoke to the men 
at the Salvation Army Industrial Home, 
and on the following evening to the girls 
at the Rescue Home. 

On September 27th I preached at the 
Wesleyan Methodist church. On Octo- 
ber 4th I preached to the men in jail on 
"The Chains of Evil Habits," and the 
need of deliverance through Christ. In 
the evening I preached at the Salvation 
Army hall. There was quite a spirit of 
prayer, and four or five sought the Lord 
at the penitent form. 

On Wednesday and Thursday of this 
week, October 7th and 8th, the State 
Convention of the Michigan Christian 
Association met in Grand Rapids. There 
were seven or eight denominations repre- 
sented. A good spirit prevailed through- 
out the whole Convention. All were en- 
couraged. Both addresses and business 
enlisted more interest this vear than last. 
Preparations were made for more ag- 
gressive work during the coming year. 
I wish that all evangelical denominations 
in this State would lay aside sectarian 
prejudices sufficiently to join hands with 
all antisecret Christian people against a 
common foe. 

The State Agent gave two addresses, 
one on "How the Lodge Dominates the 
Methodist Church," during the open par- 
liament, and one on "Lodge Oaths." 

On Octoher 15th I spoke on "High 



It .,■ «v ' 



November, 1908. 



CiiKlSTlAN CYNOSUHK. 



210 



School Fraternities" at the Alpine Ave- 
nue Christian Reformed school. The 
children seemed to understand and ap- 
preciate what was said. In the evening 
1 preached again at the Salvation Army. 
Some were under deep conviction but 
would not yield. 

This week I visited Clarksville, Sun- 
field, and Portland, looking after the As- 
sociation's interests. At each of these 
places I found friends of the work and 
received promises of future opportuni- 
ties to lecture on secrecy. 

On October 17th I came to Lansing, 
and preached in the evening at the Sal- 
vation Army hall. Three sought the 
Lord ; one of whom was so drunk it took 
two to help him to the altar. He gave 
up pipe, tobacco, and sporting papers, 
and soon found the Lord. He stood up 
alone and testified of his purpose and 
Christ's forgiveness. 

On Sunday afternoon, the r8th, I 
preached again, and five more came for- 
ward. In the evening I preached, and 
one or two came to the altar. God is con- 
tinually blessing the truth, and it moves 
on to final victory. 

Your fellow-worker, G. A. Pegram. 



MRS. LIZZIE WOODS' LETTER. 

Pine Bluff, Ark., Oct. 8, 1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips — On the 23d of 
last month I was at the Brothers' Cen- 
tral District Association. This meeting 
was at Pastoria, Arkansas, the place I 
was telling about some time ago, where 
the Oddfellows ran the man off that 
killed his wife some years ago in the 
State of Mississippi. I learned all about 
the matter while at this meeting. I 
stopped next door to the church clerk 
that carried him fifteen miles in the 
country. He is a nice, promising-look- 
ing young man, but yet he had to get a 
man out of the way of the law, on ac- 
count of his oath to the Oddfellows. The 
murderer killed his innocent wife, who 
was about to be a mother, and wrapped 
her dead body up in a quilt, and ran 
away to Arkansas. He stayed here two 
years and married again. He joined the 
Oddfellows here, but they did not know, 
when he joined, that he had killed his 
wife, so they say. That is what one of 



them told about it. One of the Oddfel- 
lows and his wife told me about the 
wicked plot. They said this man carried 
his pistol at all times. If he saw a man 
that looked like an officer, he would 
dodge out of the way, and he seemed to 
be scared all the time. At last a family 
moved here from his old home, who 
knew him and knew what a dear wife he 
had. He had changed his name, and 
pretended he did not know this family. 
The man of this family was an Oddfel- 
low, and he told on this man to the or- 
der ; so they made him tell about the mur- 
der, up in the hole in the wall at Pasto- 
ria (see Ezekiel 8:7, etc.). After he 
told the tale, the order, knowing that the 
newcomer's wife had written to the mur- 
derers' home, made up the money and 
had this good, Christian young man, 
against his will, take him fifteen miles in 
the country. The murderer told the 
brothers of the lodge that he could see 
his wife that he killed any time, wrapped 
in that quilt. He said he was the most 
miserable man on earth. He said if he 
could bring his dead wife back to life, 
he would gladly take her place in the 
grave. After his statement they run him 
to Oklahoma City. His wife number 
two went to the postoffice and mailed a 
letter to her husband. When she dropped 
the letter in the office, the detective 
stepped up to the postmaster and asked 
for the letter. The postmaster gave him 
the letter. He broke it open and found 
where the man was, and went right on 
to Oklahoma City and brought him back 
here to Pine Bluff, and wired the officer 
of Mississippi and he came at once. 
When the murderer saw the officer of 
his home he yelled like a wild cat, but 
they put the iron bracelets on his hands 
and took him home to justice. The offi- 
cer here kept the young man in jail that 
carried him off, till they got the mur- 
derer. 

I scattered the tracts as I told you I 
would do. There were great men here, 
from all over the state. Most of them 
are anti-secret men. We have some few 
that are still holding to the old Beast, 
but they are getting weak. Some of 
them told me they did not go into the 
lodge room twice a year. I said, "Yes, 
but your name and influence cause 



22C 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



others to go into the cursed idolatry." 
The moderator, Rev. D. L. Lindsay, put 
a motion before the house to stop the an- 
nual sermons in this district. Nearly all 
the preachers have quit, but a few top- 
waters that will tell any kind of tale to 
get that little money. I spoke to this 
association on Saturday night, to a 
crowded house. I told the sin of the 
secret societies and got many amens all 
over the house. A ladyucame to me: on 
Sunday, after I spoke Saturday night, 
and said, "Sister, I am. done with that 
hellish idolatry.'/ She said she had not 
been to the lodge since last May, but she 
had been sending in her .money, but she 
said, "They will never get another dollar 
out of my earnings." I said, "Thank 
God for that." An Oddfellow came to 
me last Sunday, who had heard me up 
at the association, and said, "Sister 
Woods, I am an Oddfellow ; all you say, 
and all the National Christian Associa- 
tion says, is true. I have known for a 
long time that something was wrong, 
but I have got my eyes open since you 
talked up yonder, as never before." He 
said, "My sister, the preachers who are 
hi the lodge are the cause of my being 
in there to-day. What will these preach- 
ers tell God when they appear at the 
judgment bar of God?" I said, "Mat- 
thew 7 :22." He said, "The church 
ought to care for the poor." I said, 
"She will when these false preachers 
come downstairs and bring the people 
back to the church." He said, "God 
bless you. Go on, my sister; tear us up, 
for that is what you are doing, and God 
will not let you be killed." I said, "If 
I am killed, all right ; God will put some- 
body else in my place." 

Yours in Christ, 

(Mrs.) Lizzie Woods. 



REPORT OF SPECIAL AGENT. 

Paducah, Ky., Oct. 6, 1908. 
Dear Brother Phillips : 

I received the tracts you sent me three 
days before I left Hammond, La., for 
the National Baptist Convention in Lex- 
ington, Ky. I gave out most of the 
tracts at the Convention and secured a 
good many subscribers for the Cynosure. 

Several of the ministers of the Con- 



vention informed me that it was unwise 
to spend my time working for an organi- 
zation that would cause me to become un- 
popular withi the leading people. They 
say that most of the leading people be- 
long to the lodges. I informed them that 
that was why the National Christian As- 
sociation was sending out colporteurs and 
evangelists to teach men and women the 
error of their ways. 

From Lexington I went to West Point, 
Ky., where I gave out the remainder of 
the tracts and gave one lecture. Mrs. 
Maria Wales, a seceder of West Point, 
Ky., said to me as I was about to leave, 
"Sister Randle, I feel that God wants you 
to go to Elizabethtown, Ky. I feel that 
you can do. great good there." 

At Elizabethtown I was nicely enter- 
tained at the home of Mrs. Fanny Quinn, 
who subscribed for the Cynosure and 
used her influence to get appointments 
for me at the Methodist and Baptist 
churches, where I was kindly received by 
Rev. Beamon of the M. E. church and 
Rev. Wood of the Baptist church. 

From Elizabethtown, Ky., I went to 
Central City, Ky., where I was enter- 
tained by Mrs. Clarissa Coleman, wife 
of a popular secret order man. I left 
her undecided as to whether or not Chris- 
tians should belong to secret societies. I 
pray that God may open her eyes. 

Friday, October 2d, I went to Prince- 
ton, Ky. As the Red Men's Car- 
nival was in town, I could not get a hear- 
ing before Sunday. Sunday, October 
4th, I spoke at 10:30 a. m. to the Green- 
bay Sunday-school. At 3 :30 p. m. I 
made a brief talk on our work at the 
Colored Methodist Episcopal church, 
Rev. Huron, pastor. At night I spoke at 
the Greenbay Baptist church, Rev. 
Leavel, pastor. 

I am now at Paducah. I go from here 
to Clinton, to the Tenth District Associ- 
ation of Kentucky. 

Yours for the Master, 

(Mrs.) Alice E. Randle. 



Rev. W. B. Stoddard was invited to 
speak on the lodge question on October 
27th in the Grace Evangelical Lutheran 
Church, Washington, D. C, Rev. J. E. 
A. Doermann, Pastor. 



Noyember, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



221 



RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT. 

Address at the opening of the Annual Business 
Meeting of the New England Christian Association, 
by Rev. James P. Stoddard, Corresponding Secre- 
tary. 



"Be of good courage, and He shall 
strengthen your heart, all ye that hope in 
the Lord." — Psalm 31 '.24. 

Beloved in the household of faith, 
greeting. 

Another year's labor with you in the 
Master's service has closed in harmony 
and peace. It has been a year of steady 
progress, without sudden changes or acts 
of violent opposition. God is with us to- 
day, and coming days and events are with 
Him who knoweth the end from the be- 
ginning and is never surprised by the un- 
expected. 

Evidences that an impending crisis in 
this world's affairs is hastening, are 
cumulative. Principalities and powers 
have not ceased to do evil and learned to 
do well, nor have the kingdoms of this 
world become the kingdoms of our Lord. 
The apocalyptic "woe to the inhabiters 
of the earth and of the sea" still sounds 
the alarm, and a wrathful devil, burning 
with rage against Christ the King and 
His bride the church, is urging on and 
organizing the hosts of evil men and se- 
ducers towards that Armageddon conflict, 
in which blood shall flow to the horse's 
bridle. It is a fearful picture of un- 
precedented wreck and disaster, which 
means costly sacrifice and desperate 
fighting, but certain victory to the Lion 
of Judah and his valiant army. 

Confronted by such conditions, it be- 
hooves us to heed the admonition, "Be 
ye also ready." Our Leader expects us 
to show our loyalty and prove our weap- 
ons by faithfulness and valor, in the pre- 
liminary skirmishes to the superlative 
and final encounter. Have we done it 
the past year ? Are we doing it to-day ? 
Are we ready to bind our souls, by sol- 
emn covenant with God and with each 
other, by the help of divine grace to do 
it in the future? The recording angel is 
entering the silent response of each 
heart, in "the book of remembrance," at 
this very moment. Brother, sister, fel- 
low-comrade, what has been your record 
the past year? What is your present 
attitude ? and what, by God's help, are 



you purposing to do during the year upon 
which we have just entered? Are these 
not pertinent and important questions at 
this time? 

Surely we ought to know our attitude 
towards God, and His attitude towards 
us and the organization we are here to 
represent. Are we right with God? Did 
He plant the New England Christian 
Association for a specific purpose? Have 
we His mind and are we acting under 
that great commission, "Behold, I send 
you forth as sheep in the midst of 
wolves"? If so, we are clothed with di- 
vine authority and warranted in claim- 
ing the promised help and protection 
which the cause requires. Although as 
seen by men, ours is a "little flock," we 
may boldly affirm, "They that be with us 
are more than they that be with them." 

God's attitude towards us is deter- 
mined by our attitude towards his Son, 
Jesus Christ: Without faith in His Son 
it is impossible to please God. Christ is 
"The Truth," and unless we and our 
organization are rooted and grounded in 
Him we are powerless in the presence of 
our adversary, the devil. However zeal- 
ous and self-sacrificing we may be, our 
best efforts will prove abortive and come 
to naught. We must be able to say 
truthfully, "On Christ, the solid Rock 
we stand," if we would make any im- 
pression upon the flinty ramparts of re- 
sisting forces. 

Without the mind of Christ in the or- 
dering of our lives and the conduct of 
our work we shall but repeat the expe- 
rience of those Galilean fishermen who 
toiled all night and took nothing. Had 
they despaired of success and given up at 
the midnight hour, they would never 
have met the Master and received their 
reward at the dawning. If it be the 
mind of Chrst that we should encounter 
head-winds and toil in the midst of dis- 
couragements, we must nevertheless la- 
bor on until the morning breaks and the 
shadows flee away. 

Let us remember that God is never 
in haste. He takes his own time to up- 
root deep-seated systems of wickedness. 
It took decades to abolish the slave-sys- 
tem. The faithful in two centuries work- 
ed and prayed, apparently to little pur- 



29-2 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



pose; but when God's time came, four 
millions of serfs came out of the house 
of their bondage, as free as Peter was 
when conducted by an angel out of the 
prison at Jerusalem. "Yet a little while, 
and He that shall come will come, and 
will not tarry." 

Motive has very much to do with re- 
sults. Mere sentiment or sympathy are 
not sufficient. They will prove a sandy 
foundation in times that try men's souls. 
In our work, nothing short of deep con- 
viction that Ihe lodge-system is a relig- 
ion; that it denies and dishonors Christ, 
and teaches the fatal delusion that wicked 
men may be forgiven and eternally saved, 
without the atonement — this deep-seated 
conviction is the only impelling power 
that will bring men into the fighting- 
line at the front and hold them steady- 
when the battle waxes hot. Love of hon- 
or, or worldly advantage, or even sym- 
pathy for the distressed, are superficial, 
and the person who is moved by no 
stronger motive, even though he should 
enlist for a season, is sure to wither like 
the stoney-ground hearer of the word, 
however zealous at the beginning. 

If the lodge-system affected the tem- 
poralities of this life only, would it be 
folly to expend time and energy in its 
destruction? but when, after rejecting 
Christ, it teaches that men may climb 
up to heaven some other way, it assumes 
the attitude of a rival of Christ and an 
antagonist to the religion which He 
founded in the shedding of His blood 
for the remission of sins. If the lodge 
claim is founded in fact, then Peter's 
declaration, "There is none other name 
under heaven, given among men, where- 
by we must be saved," is a mistake, and 
the whole Bible is misleading. The Bi- 
ble teaches that there is a heaven and 
a hell, that men are sinners, and that the 
only way of escape from punishment is 
through the door of mercy. Christ says, 
"I am the door ; by Me if any man enter 
in, he shall be saved," and "No man com- 
eth to the Father but by Me." The Lodge 
contradicts the Bible and substitutes rit- 
uals and ceremonies for the atonement. 
It proclaims to the world that the Christ- 
excluding services in their secret wor- 
ship "furnishes all that the soul of man 
requires." And multitudes believe it. 



Brethren, I am persuaded that the 
greatest need of our work to-day is not 
money, but a sound, Biblical conviction 
that the secret lodges of this city and 
country are sending men, and women, 
too, straight to hell in platoons and bat- 
talions. If the Bible is true (and it is) 
and the facts are as we know them to 
be, any other conclusion is impossible. A 
soul trusting in the lodge religion for sal- 
vation is as surely doomed as a heathen 
in any other land, and when we realize 
this fact and our responsibility to warn 
them, we will count it all joy to do our 
utmost to save men from the grip of this 
monster evil. 

To be successful we must be humble 
and much given to prayer. With the ex- 
ample and teachings of our Lord before 
us, in the days of His humiliation, we 
are certainly without excuse. To Him 
the Spirit was given without measure, 
yet He continued all night in prayer be- 
fore selecting from His disciples twelve 
"whom also He named apostles." Fol- 
lowing the Pentecostal baptism, when the 
disciples were filled with the Holy Spir- 
it, the twelve whom Jesus had chosen 
called an assembly of the multitude of 
disciples and directed them to select 
"seven men of honest report, full of the 
Holy Ghost and wisdom," to look after 
the temporalites of the church, that they 
(the apostles) might give themselves 
continually to prayer, and to the ministry 
of the word." Paul knew the deepest 
needs of a Spirit-filled soul and of a 
body of believers, and his familiar in- 
junction is, "Pray without ceasing." The 
devout in all ages have deemed com- 
munion with God in prayer a boon of in- 
estimable worth. It is the Christian's 
vital breath, and no reformer can long 
maintain his spiritual life and power 
without it. It is the key which unlocks 
the arsenal o f heaven, -and puts weapons 
in our hands with which to make both a 
defensive and aggressive war with the 
devil and all his minions. It is Christ's 
prescri, tion in all desperate straits; for, 
when speaking of a very obstinate case, 
which baffled the best efforts of His dis- 
ciples, He said, "This kind goeth not out 
but by prayer and fasting." When ap- 
proaching the hour of His own betrayal, 
trial and crucifixion, you remember how 



November, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



223 



in Gethsemane's garden He agonized in 
prayer, until He sweat as it were great 
drops of blood. I cannot too strongly 
urge this duty upon every member of this 
Association. Not one of us can afford 
to neglect it, and we may not but at ex- 
treme peril to our own souls and to the 
cause intrusted to our care. May God 
help us to be more faithful in prayer ! 

We are God's witnesses, and He ex- 
pects us to improve our opportunities to 
-testify for the truth and against untruth. 
If. we have found deliverance and peace 
in Christ our. Lord, we should confess 
Him before men. If we have found the 
Lodge a delusion and snare, we should 
be equally bold in warning men to avoid 
and abandon it. Why is not the one duty 
just as imperative as the other? When 
we know the evil, is not silence an im- 
plied testimony in its favor ? "Inasmuch 
as ye did it not" is conspicuous among 
the charges against those of whom it is 
said, "These shall go away into everlast- 
ing punishment." Being forewarned, it 
is our duty to avoid the fate of that 
"servant who knew his Lord's will and 
did it not." You remember Christ's di- 
rection to Peter, "When thou art con- 
verted, strengthen thy brethren." 

When Israel's greatest king would en- 
courage and inspire his subjects with 
confidence and zeal to conquer and sub- 
due their enemies, he did not minimize 
the difficulties and dangers of the under- 
taking, but exhorted them to be of good 
courage and "remember God's marvelous 
works that He hath done, His wonders 
and the judgments of His mouth," and 
gave them the 105th Psalm of inspira- 
tion. We do well to seek courage and 
inspiration in our work from the same 
source. What hath God wrought for and 
by the New England Christian Associa- 
tion? Was the organization born of the 
ilcsh or of the Spirit? Has it a specific 
and God-appointed work assigned to it? 
We believe the anti-slavery societies of 
the first half of the nineteenth century 
had very much to do with the breaking- 
up of that accursed system of human 
chattelism. They did their work and dis- 
appeared when no longer needed. Has 
the New England Christian Association 
a similar mission to perform, in eman- 



cipating our country from the thralldom 
of the secret empire? Negro slavery was 
local, but the Lodge is cosmopolitan. It 
knows no "Mason and Dixon line," and 
recognizes no civil or ecclesiastical gov- 
ernment as paramount to its own. It en- 
ters every party in politics, that it may 
control thein. It joins every religious 
body from which it is not rigidly exclud- 
ed. It lays its hidden hand upon our ju- 
diciary system and paralyzes the arm of 
justice in our civil courts. It binds pres- 
ident and peasant alike under its bru- 
tal oaths, and stealthily manipulates the 
marts of trade so that no man may buy 
or sell, on equal terms with his fellows, 
unless he has the mystic seal of some se- 
cret clan. It is against this gigantic im- 
postor that our "little flock" has unfurled 
its banner, in defense of the equal rights 
of men and the royal household of the 
Christian faith. 

Can anyone who believes in God doubt 
for a moment that the godly few who 
founded this work were led by His spir- 
it? No worldly or selfish motive could 
have impelled them to enter upon such a 
hazardous undertaking. I sincerely be- 
lieve those great souls were moved by 
the Holy Ghost in their work, as was 
Nehemiah to rebuild the temple and the 
walls of Jerusalem, or Garrison, Phil- 
lips, and their compeers to form anti- 
slavery societies and lead in the great 
battle for human freedom ; and what God 
plants He will defend and support until 
it has accomplished His purpose. Hith- 
erto He hath supplied all our needs ac- 
cording to His riches in glory by Christ 
Jesus. God has not exhausted His treas- 
ures or gone into bankruptcy. The hearts 
of all men are still in His hand, and the 
treasures of the whole earth are at His 
disposal. 

The past has been rich in blessing: and 
why distrust Him for the future? He 
has given prosperity and health to the 
official members of this body, and not one 
of our number has been removed by 
death during the past year. The wisdom 
of your committee in selecting No. 560 
Columbus avenue as the home and head- 
quarters of reform work in New England 
has become more and more apparent ev- 
crv year. The building is well located, 



224 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



November, 1908. 



suitable for our purposes, and property 
in this locality is steadily advancing in 
value. There is every reason to believe 
that it v. ill be one of the important cen- 
ters in the south end district in the near 
future. Business is coming this way, 
and desirable corners are in demand. 
Rentals from rooms not required for our 
work, and means derived from other 
sources, have been sufficient to meet cur- 
rent expenses and close the financial year 
with a balance on the credit side of ac- 
counts. Four new tracts have been added 
to the list, in editions of 5,000 each ; and 
about 15,000 of these, with other liter- 
ature, have been put in circulaton among 
the people. During the vacation season 
God gave me strength to visit six impor- 
tant religious gatherings, at all of which, 
except the M. E. camp meeting at Willi- 
mantic, Conn , your agent and our anti- 
secrecy literature have been cordially 
welcomed. The six consecutive confer- 
ences at East Northfield, Mass., the Na- 
tional Prohibition Convention at Colum- 
bus, Ohio, and the Advent camp meeting 
at Alton Bay, N. H,, gave the widest and 
most hopeful fields for work, which I 
occupied without let or hindrance. In 
each of these I found abundant proofs 
that labors in the past had not been in 
vain in the Lord. 

The outlook is by no means discour- 
aging. It calls for faith in God, loyalty 
to each other, and ceaseless activity in 
the prosecution of our work. Our adver- 
sary is strong, but his bulwarks are not 
impenetrable. Contention within his own 
ranks is ominous of "breakers ahead." 
So fierce has the contention become, that 
it has received special legislation for its 
protection, secured by its own members 
who have been sent to the Legislature by 
the secret fraternities to do their bidding. 
Some of the people, at least, are begin- 
ning to understand that the secret lodge 
system is a gigantic political machine, 
and that our city, State and national laws 
are simply filtered through legislative 
forms under the supervision of expert 
strategists, elected by the voters but se- 
lected by the Lodge for that very pur- 
pose ; and it is only a question of time, as 
to how long the masses will quietly sub- 
mit to such an outrage. Public opinion 



may be tardy in its movements, and. even, 
capricious in its methods; but when it as- 
serts itself, revolutions sometimes follow 
quickly. I claim no prophetic sentiment : 
but stranger things have happened than 
the exclusion of lodge emissaries from 
legislative assemblies, and the pulpits and 
churches, in all this land, within the next 
decade. "The things which are impos- 
sible with men, are possible with God." 

What God needs is a strong, devout, 
and consecrated administration to direct 
the affairs of this Association, and vigor- 
ous, godly men and women to canvass 
New England with literature and pro- 
claim the gospel of deliverance from sin 
and the bondage of the Lodge, through 
Christ Jesus, our exalted High Priest and 
King. 

Beloved fellow-laborers, it is our priv- 
ilege and duty to supply the first, of these 
requirements : and what shall be our re- 
sponse? God has moved some, already, 
to consider favorably a call to enter upon 
the more active and extended field; and 
others will be ready when the Lord hath 
need of them. Would we not do well to 
begin this year by heeding the counsel of 
Peter, who exhorted his brethren in the 
church at Jerusalem : "Look out among 
you seven men of honest report, full of 
the Holy Ghost and of wisdom," to man- 
age the affairs of this body and render 
final decision in any matter of interest in 
its work? 

Before entering upon the formal busi- 
ness of this annual gathering, let us pre- 
sent our bodies in living sacrifice to the 
Lord, and most fervently pray for di- 
vine guidance in selecting the officers and 
planning the campaign for the ensuing 
year. 

With unfeigned gratitude to God for 
improved health ; to my brethren and sis- 
ters who have so considerately borne with 
my shortcomings ; arid to the official 
members who have heartily responded to 
my suggestions, I am, 

Your fellow-servant in the Master's 
vineyard, James P. Stoddard, Cor. Sec'y> 
N. E. C. A. 



"He who works both night and day, 
will soon sleep both night and day — and 
through a long series of years." 



STANDARD ILLUSTRATED RITUALS 

SERMONS, ESSAYS, AND HISTORICAL DATA 
CONCERNING T ODGES 

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ON FREEMASONRY 

FREEMASONRY ILLUSTRATED. 

The complete ritual of the three degrees of 
j the Blue Lodge. By Jacob O. Doesburg, Past 
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Profusely Illustrated. A historical sketch of the 
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accuracy of this ritual is legally attested by J. 
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This book gives the opening, closing, secret 
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The complete revised ritual of the Lodge, 
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REVISED KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS RIx 

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MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA RIT- 
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EXPERIENCE OF STEPHEN MERRITT, 

THE EVANGELIST 

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WHY I LEFT THE MASONS. 

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CHICAGO. DECEMBER, 1908. 



Polar Night, 

Thou Serv'st 
A WAYMARK 




The Beauty of the 
World. 

Rev. William V. Kelley, D, D. 

The beauty and chief ornaments of 
the world are human; no flower is as 
lovely as a sweet child; no sunrise as 
splendid as the golden morning of a 
young manhood or womanhood; no 
crystal as beautiful as the firm purity 
of a clarified character; no mountain 
so imposing and sublime as a lofty 
life ; no harvest of fields or fruitage on 
branches so fair as the goodly product 
of a useful and noble career. 

From "The Ripening Experiences of Life." 



CHRISTIAN CYN03URE 

WILLIAM IRVING PHILLIPS 

Managing Editor 

221 West Madison Street, Chicago 



TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION 

PRICE— Per year, in advance, $ 1 .00; three months, on trial, 
twenty-five cents; single copies, ten cents. 

PRESENTATION COPIES — Many persons subscribe for the 
Christian Cynosure to be sent to»FRIENDS. In such 
cases, if we are advised that a subscription is a present 
and not regularly authorized by the recipient, we will 
make a memorandum to discontinue at expiration, and to 
send no bill for the ensuing year. 

Entered as Second-class matter May 19, 1897, at the 
Post Office at ChicagD, IJ1., under Act of March 3, 1879. 



CONTENTS. 



One Seceder to Another " 225 

Experience oif an Ex^. O. U. W 225 

A Seceding Oddfellow 226 

Evangelist Withdraws from Masonry. .. .226 

Oakdale, 111., M. W. A 227 

"By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know 

Them." By Rev. H. H. Hinman 229 

"Square Deal for All." By J. O. Young. .280 

/Chaplain Repeats Criticism 232 

Oldest Mason in the Country 232 

The Moody Bible Institute ...233 

An Ancient Lodge Secretary .233 

Nature Fakers .234 

A Cunningly Devised Snare 235 

A Mental and Moral Effect. .237 

According to Masonic Authorities. ..... .237 

Oddfellow Religious Claims 239 

Eight Hundred Hibernians See Initia- 
tion . . . , . . . .241 

Interesting, Important and Encouraging. 242 

School Fraternities. By Geilest 242 

The "Charter Oak" Bridge 243 

The African Charter 244 

Prince Hall Masonic Centenary. 244 

Handicraft and Guild: Factory and 

Union 246 

From Our Mail . .'. 246 

\Lodge Entertainment : Candidate Serious- 
ly Injured 247 

Obituary : Josiah W. (Leeds and Elder 

-Rufus Smith 250 

News of Our Work 250 

Report of Indiana Annual Convention ... 255 



SERMONS AND ADDRESSES 

"A SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES" 

By Rev. S. P. Long, A. M., Pastor of First 
English Lutheran Church, Mansfield, Ohio. A 
very convincing article against secret societies 
argued from a Scriptural standpoint. 27 pages, 
8vo. f paper cover, 7c, per doz. 60c. 

"DIE RELIGION DER GEHEQIEN GE- 

SELLSCHAFTEN" 

By Prof. Gottfried Fritschel, D. D., of the 
Wartburg Theological Seminary. 76 pages, 
paper cover, 25c, per doz. $2.40. 

"WAS HAT DIE KIRCHE MIT DER LOGS 

ZU THUN?" 

By Rev. Prof. George Fritschel of Wartburg 
Theological Seminary, Dubuque, la. 44 pages, 
paper cover, 10c, per doz. $1.00. 

"THESEN NEBER DIE GEHEIMEN GE- 
SELLSCHAFTEN." 

By Prof. Gottfried Fritschel, D. D. Paper 5c. 

ARE SECRET SOCIETIES A BLESSING? 

An address by Rev. B. Carradine, D. D., 
pastor of the Centenary M. B. church, St. Louis, 
Mo., Jan. 4, 1891. W. McCoy writes: "That ser- 
mon ought to be in the hands of every preacher 
in this land, and every citizen's, too." A pamphlet 
of 20 pages. 5 cents. 

PROF. J. G. CARSON, D. D., ON SECRET 
SOCIETIES. 

A most convincing argument against fellow- 
sniping Freemasons in the Christiac Church. 10 
cents. 

FREEMASONRY CONTRARY TO THE 
CHRISTIAN RELIGION. 

By "Spectator,'' Atlanta, Ga. 16 pages; 
5 cents. 

FREEMASONRY SYMBOLIZED IN REVE- 
LATION. 

By Rev. James P. Stoddard. This is an at- 
tempt to answer the questions : "Is a prodigious 
system, drawing into itself and unifying all minor 
conspiracies, symbolized in the 'Book of Revelar 
tion' ?" and is there now in active operation a 
system approximating the description given in 
Revelation? This is a book both instructive and 
interesting. 30 cents. 

SERMON ON MASONRY. 

By Rev. J. Day Brownlee. In reply to a 
Masonic oration by Rev. Dr. Mayer, Wellsville, 
Ohio. 5 cents. 

FINNEY ON MASONRY. 

"The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of 
Freemasonry," by Ex-President Charles Q. Finney, 
of Oberlin College. 

President Finney was a "bright Mason," but left 
the lodge when he became a Christian. This book 
has opened the eyes of multitudes. Cloth, 75 
cents ; paper, 50 cents. 

Address National Christian Association, 221 
West Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

SERMON ON SECRET SOCIETIES. 

By Rev. Daniel Dow, Woodstock, Conn. The 

special object of this sermon is to show the right 

. and duty of Christians to inquire into the real 

character of secret societies, no matter what 

objects such societies profess to have. 5 cents. 

GRAND LODGE MASONRY. 

Its relation to civil government and the Chris- 
tian religion. By President J. Blanchard. The 
un-Christian, anti-republican and despotic char- 
acter of Freemasonry is proved from the highest 
Masonic authorities. 5 cents. 





"Jesus answered him, — I spake openly to ihe world; and in secret have I said nothing," John 18:20. 



VOLUME XLI. 



CHICAGO, DECEMBER, 1908. 



NUMBER 8 



ONE SECEDER TO ANOTHER. 

"I am glad to note the fact that you 
[Rev. W. S. Bandy] have quit all secret 
orders. About twenty years ago I joined 
the Freemasons. Later on I was elected 
Sheriff of the county, which was over- 
whelmingly Democratic. Some could 
hardly endure it, that an old Republican 
should be Sheriff, but thev had to take it. 
The worst thing they could see to do, 
was to throw me out of Masonry. 

"I can say there never was a poorer 
thing on earth than Masonry. All these 
trifling secret orders are founded on Ro- 
man Popery. The lodge system is rotten 
from start to finish, as far as religion is 
concerned. Notice the last expression of 
our Saviour while on earth, Tn secret 
have I said nothing' ; and at another time 
he said, Whatsoever ye hear in secret, 
proclaim it from the housetops ! I think 
these two passages sufficient to knock the 
lint off secret orders. They are nothing 
but the devil's get-up, from start to fin- 
ish, and I don't propose ever to let my 
mind so much as think of belonging to a 
thing of the kind again." 

"T. L. Bandv." 

"Catawba, N. C, Feb. 3, 1908." 



EXPERIENCE OF A SECEDER. 
Preacher Abandons the A. O. U. W. 

In the fall of 1903, while Methodist 
preacher at Halbrite, Sask., Canada, I 
was induced to join the lodge called the 
Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
which was then being organized at Este- 
van, Sask., joining it with some other 
ministers and a number of professing 
Christians. 

The organizer was a Presbyterian, and 
with other Christians, I could then see no 
harm in it.- The first thing that caused 
questionings of conscience was the initial 
oath, which began, "I, in the presence of 
Almighty God and these witnesses here 



assembled," etc. It was a very solemn 
obligation and we took it with our hand- 
on the Bible, opened at 13th chapter of 
I. Corinthians. 

I felt that Almighty God had nothing 
to do with it, and should not be invoked 
in the proceedings. Speaking afterwards 
to an unconverted man who was initiat- 
ed the same evening, I discovered he had 
the same feeling and had hesitated about 
obligating himself in such terms, think- 
ing that a promise was enough. 

I had not been long in the lodge before 
the obligation of secrecy became irksome 
— it seemed to me to be unnatural and 
unnecessary. Further, I was oath-bound 
to some ungodly men, whom I was com- 
pelled to brother in the lodge-room. I 
sometimes acted as Chaplain and read 
the prayers for them, but there was no 
mention of Christ in them, nor apparent- 
ly any need for Him. God was the Fath- 
er of us all, according to the teaching of 
the lodge, as witnesses the opening ode, 
which ran thus : 

"Welcome, brothers; let us render 
Thanks to God, our Father dear : 

Grateful praise for care so tender 
And the joy of meeting here."' 

I then began to take notice, in tin- lodge 
paper, of the doings of 9ome other 
brandies of the A. O. U. W. Their 
balls, and advertised dances, card-parties, 
etc., all convinced me I was connected 
with an organization with which I had no 
business as a Christian man. 

Tn October, 1904, i was -cut to 
preach near Caron, Sask., and getting 
clearer light on the whole lodge system, 
from some Free Methodist brethren, I 

cut (Hit the lodge, and have never regret- 
ted it. feeling that the sooner a bad oath 
is broken the better. 

Since then I have exerted my influence 



226 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1908. 



against secretism. I became pastor of 
the M. E. church at Clarkfield, Minn., in 
1905, and efforts were made there to 
have me join the Woodmen, but as I 
preached and talked against them the}- 
soon let me alone. Had the same experi- 
ence here, when I came as pastor last 
fall, but it is becoming well known now 
that I am an anti-lodge man. Some oth- 
er pastors in this Minnesota Conference 
are taking the same stand, and I believe 
their number is increasing. Our best 
people here approve of the stand I take, 
although it brings me opposition in some 
quarters. 

If a man cannot learn charity and true 
fraternity at the feet of Jesus Christ, he 
can learn it nowhere else. 

Yours, out of the lodge aud out to 
stay. H. W. Cannon, 

Pastor M. E. Church, Hendricks, Minn. 



A SECEDING ODDFELLOW. 

Pilot Grove, Mo., April 7, 1908. 
By some means the April number of 
your magazine came into my hands and 
I am somewhat amused in reading the 
article signed by John H. Shaw, extoll- 
ing the Odd Fellows' Lodge, and the 
beautiful teaching and high aims of the 
order, etc. In reply, will state that I 
was an Odd Fellow in good standing 
for about twelve years ; that I occupied 
and held nearly every office in the Odd 
Fellows' lodge; that I know the ins and 
outs of Odd Fellowship from "A to 
Izzard," including its side degrees, which 
no self-respecting man would care to go 
through with again. I positively assert 
and affirm that the word Christ is not 
found in any ritual of Odd Fellowship 
or any word or meaning that has anv 
relation to Christ whatever. The Chap- 
lain of the lodge merely reads a printed 
prayer, printed in the ritual of the 
lodge; he dare not pray in the name of 
Christ; he can be fined under the rules 
of the order for so doing. Our Lord 
Jesus Christ is barred absolutely from 
Odd Fellowship — from its ritual — and 
the door of the lodgeroom locked against 
Him. No member dare mention the 
name of Christ or speak in His praise 
in debate or otherwise for fear of of- 
fending some Christless Jew sitting in 



the lodge. He would be instantly de- 
clared out of order by the presiding 
officer and subject to a fine. Poor, de- 
luded men, they are seeking to reach the 
Father through their own so-called good 
works, denying their Lord, who boug J ht 
them with His own precious blood. 

As a Christian I could not remain in 
the lodge that barred my Christ from 
the lodge. No child of God can go into 
any place that he can not take Christ 
with him, or where Christ would not be 
welcomed. 

No prayer ever prayed or read in an 
Odd Fellows' lodge went higher than 
the ceiling of the lodgeroom, because 
not uttered in the name of Christ. 

And, in conclusion, I positively assert 
and affirm without fear of successful 
contradiction, that neither John H. 
Shaw, nor any other Odd Fellow in the 
United States, can find the word Christ, 
or Christ's name used, in any teach- 
ing of Odd Fellowship, or in any pray- 
er written or uttered in any ritual used 
in any Odd Fellows' lodge. The article 
written by E. Ronayne in your April 
number is true and correct in every re- 
spect. 

— F. W. Moore, in The Hatched 



EVANGELIST WITHDRAWS FROM 
MASONRY. 

Andalusia, Ala., Sept. 7, 1908. 

I will speak a few words through the 
Cynosure, about how God delivered me 
from secret orders. I am thankful to 
God to-day that I am free from oath- 
bound, ungodly societies. 

I will confess that when I joined I 
really did so somewhat against my best 
judgment. I had, several years before,, 
read the first three degrees of "Freema- 
sonry Illustrated," sold by the National 
Christian Association.. Yet the evil one 
finally persuaded me to believe that it 
would be a means of exercising a larger 
influence among ungodly men, to be made 
a Mason: and so under his Satanic sug- 
gestions I allowed a preacher of the gos- 
pel to put in my application. The lodge 
put me through free of charge, in order, 
no doubt, that they might use me as a 
bait to catch others. 

From the time I was admitted into the 



December, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



227 



lodge and marched from point to point 
up to the last part of the third degree I 
was not surprised at hardly anything that 
I saw or heard. I had read practically 
all of it. The day that I was "entered 7 ' 
as an Apprentice I had to preach the 
gospel in the church nearby, and when I 
reached the pulpit I could not help but 
notice what effect the hilarity and fool- 
ishness and shame of the initiation cere- 
mony had upon my preaching ; it seemed 
that God was frowning upon the course 
that I was pursuing. 

Old Satan continued to delude and of- 
fer inducements for me to go on ; and in 
spite of all good influences, the next reg- 
ular meeting of Harrison Lodge, No. 
246, A. F. & A. M., at Henderson, Ala., 
found me ready to be "passed" to the 
degree of Fellowcraft. After I had been 
"raised to the sublime degree of Master 
Mason" my conscience seemed to sleep 
for a time, and I became a strong advo- 
cate of Free and Accepted Masonry. I 
memorized the lectures and was in de- 
mand to instruct "rusty boys" and newly 
initiated Masons. 

In a short time the Holy Spirit began 
to open up the Scriptures to my mind, 
and my awakened conscience began to 
lash me terribly. I moved from Troy to 
Opp, Ala., and I shall never forget one- 
night. I left my precious wife after sup- 
per and went to the lodge-room. There 
were several to be "raised." The clock 
hands were pointing to eleven and one 
more was to be "raised." I was "work- 
ing" in the "West," and being urged to 
stay, I did so. In the "wee, sma' hours" 
I went to my home. I found my wife in 
tears, not knowing but that something 
dreadful had happened to me. Oh, how 
the Holy Spirit rebuked me for the pre- 
cious hours I had wasted in foolish riot- 
ing ! 

Only a few days elapsed before the 
Lord showed me that I must obey II. 
Corinthians 6: 17 or lose what grace He 
had already given me. / did obey. He 
did free me. I am free to-day. Praise 
God! 

Hoping that my experience may be 
used of the Lord to cause some precious 
soul to be led from unholy secrecy io 
open truth, I am Yours in His service. 
Evangelist William O. Self. 



OAKDALE, ILL., M. W. A. 

The secret fraternity known as For- 
esters, or Modern Woodmen, is one of 
the most pernicious and dangerous of 
all the secret orders. It has some of 
the worst features of the fraternities, 
particularly the outrageous abuses prac- 
ticed at its initiations. At Clinton, Mo., 
the other day, Howard Peotner filed a 
suit in the Circuit Court against the 
Modern Woodmen lodge for $25,000 
damages, because of personal injuries 
inflicted during his initiation — injuries 
that are likely to maim him for life. 
Mrs. Rev. W. S. Fulton, of Coulter- 
ville, says that while they resided at 
Idana, Kansas, a young man, Harvey 
Rankin, was obliged to draw his revolv- 
er in self-defense when his initiatory 
ceremonies had passed the danger line, 
in a Woodman lodge. In this vicinity 
recently a young man was being initiated 
by the Woodmen, and when they began 
their degrading orgies, threatening him 
with personal violence, he drew a revol- 
ver and commanded them all to stand 
back, while he deliberately inarched out 
of the lodge room never to return. Be- 
fore the Woodmen in Oakdale built 
their lodge hall almost within the shadow 
of our church, they initiated their mem- 
bers on the first floor of a vacant store 
room, and the distressing cries of some 
of these victims still ring in the people's 
ears. We have been asked how it 
came to pass that such a heathen insti- 
tution could spring up and live in a 
Covenanter and United Presbyterian 
community like Oakdale. We believe 
it was owing to the policy of "silence" 
or "let it alone ;" "agitation only in- 
creases the evil ;" "the orders only grow 
by opposition." But Jesus gave no heed 
to this policy when the devils said, '"'let 
us alone ; art thon come to torment us 
before the time?" Isaiah said. "My 
people are destroyed for lack of knowl- 
edge." The only policy with every evil, 
and especially with the secret society 
curse, is to turn on the light. There is 
no evil that can long withstand the light 
of God's truth. 
— Christian Nation, July 15, 1908. 

"The best swimmers are generally 
short-lived." 



2,28 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1908. 



TESTIMONIES OF SECEDERS 



PRESIDENT a G. FINNEY, OBERLIN, OHIO 

^Pastor, Evangelist and 
a renouncing Mason 

'.' How can we fail to pronounce Freemasonry an antichristian institution ? Its morally is 
unchristian. Its oath-bound secrecy is unchristian. The administration and taking of* its oaths 
are unchristian, and a violation of a positive command of Christ. Masonic oaths pledge its mem- 
bers to commit most unlawful and unchristian deeds ; to conceal each other's crimes ; to deliver 
each other from difficulty whether right or wrong ; to unduly favor Masonry in political actions and 

in business transactions j its members are sworn to retaliate, 
and persecute unto death the violators of Masonic obliga- 
tions. * * -X- lt s oaths are profane, the taking of the 
name of God in vain. The penalties of these oaths are 
barbarous, and even savage. Its teachings are false and 
profane. Its design is partial and selfish. Its ceremonies 
are a mixture of puerility and profanity. Its religion is 
deistic. It is a false religion, and professes to save men upon 
other conditions than those revealed in the Gospel of Christ. 
It is a virtual conspiracy against both church and state. 
Those who adhere intelligently and determinedly to such an 
institution have no right to be in the Christian church. 
■fc * •& If Freemasonry is a sin, a sham, an abomination, 
as I know it to be, and as you also know, then there is but 
one way open to us, or to any honest man who knows what 
Freemasonry is, and that way is to bear a most decided and 
persistent testimony against it, cost what it may. If any 
man will withhold his testimony against so great a wrong 
to save his influence he will sooner or later lose it." 




PRES. C. G. FINNEY 



^EV. m. L. HANEY 

Pastor of M. E. Church, Evan- 
gelist and a seceder from Masonry 

"I have seen the church prayer-meeting nearly desolate in 
every part of the country, because many of its members had 
their hearts divided with the lodge. I have demonstrated, in 
thirty years of evangelism, that it is well-nigh impossible to 
have a wide, deep, thorough revival of religion in any com- 
munity, town, or city which has been honey-combed by the 
influences of the lodge. In my seventy-ninth year, and before 
I depart to God, I felt I must leave the above testimony." 




REV. M. L. HANEY 



COL. GEORGE R. CLARKE 

Founder of the Pacific Garden 
Mission and a renouncing Mason 

"I have been a member of several secret societies. I was a 3 2° Mason in Chicago 
before the fire; I also belonged to the Blue Lodge and other intervening orders. In all those that 
I belonged to, the association was with the men of the world, without respect to their religion, 
whether they had any or had none at all. Such men as atheists, infidels, Mohammedans, Catho- 
lics and Protestants can all unite together in these secret associations on an equality, in a bond 
which they call the 'bond of brotherhood. ' 



December, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



229 



Contribution 



"BY THEIR FRUITS YE SHALL KNOW 
THEM.'' 

No fact is better established than that, 
in the moral as well as the natural world, 
the practical fruits of all customs and in- 
stitutions are the determining- factors in 
their character, and that whatever does 
not conserve the public good will sooner 
or later be condemned by the voice of the 
people. 

This is manifest in the temperance re- 
form. It has taken a long time to con- 
vince the American people that the use of 
and traffic in intoxicants is not a good 
thing to be protected, but an evil to be 
abolished by the surest methods ; but now 
eight States have wheeled into the line 
of absolute prohibition, while more than 
half the territory of other States has been 
voted dry. Similar verdicts have been 
given in reference to the practice of duel- 
ing, gambling, the lottery, and other 
forms of public vice. Human slavery, 
which was once prevalent and popular 
over most of the world, has been practic- 
ally outlawed by all civilized nations, and 
there is "none so poor as to do it rever- 
ence." When international war shall be 
placed in the same category, is only a 
question of time. The forces are at work 
that will undoubtedly produce this result. 
The writer can look back over seventy- 
five years, and see a great change in pub- 
lic opinion in that time. 

The system of organized secrecy is no 
exception to this rule. Its evil fruits 
have been obvious to such eminent states- 
men as John Quincy Adams, Webster, 
Seward, and others, and such eminent 
Christians as Finney, Moody, Pentecost, 
and many others. It seems entrenched in 
the popular selfishness of the day, and is 
hard to eradicate from the popular mind. 

Among its evil fruits are: 
ist. It supplants Christianity as the 
best method of promoting human wel- 
fare. Diffident as has been the action of 
the organized church, it has been the 
great power for the renovation of society 
and the elevation of public opin- 
ion. Whatever tends to absorb the pub- 
lic mind, teaching neglect of manifesl 



duties and diverting attention from the 
eternal truths of Christianity, must de- 
lay, according to the* extent of its influ- 
ence, the consummation of its great work 
— the establishment of the Divine King- 
dom on the earth. It is quite obvious 
that, while many secretists give their as- 
sent to Christianity, they do little for its 
promotion. Their time and attention is 
largely absorbed in the ends for which 
their lodges were established. They 
could not, if they would, give their un- 
divided attention to the cause of Christ. 
Hence we rarely see secret lodge mem- 
bers in the prayer-meetings, and we never 
hear the lodge openly advocated as a 
means of bringing the world to Christ. 

2d. The purposes of the lodge are not 
worldwide and beneficent, but partial and 
exclusive, and its tendency is to promote 
the selfish ends of the individual and the 
order, to the neglect of that practical 
altruism which is the substance of prac- 
tical Christianity. 

3d. The objects of the lodges are not 
only quite dissimilar to those of our Lord, 
but its methods are often the very re- 
verse. He "spake openly to the world" ; 
in secret He said nothing. He command- 
ed to go into all the world and proclaim 
His gospel to every creature, while the 
secret lodge makes silence and secrecy 
anions' its cardinal virtues. Christ says, 
"Come unto me and I will give you rest' : 
while secrecy hides behind tyled doors 
and says, "1 will take you in if you ai< 
not too young or too old, and are sound 
in body, and pay your dues now and 
henceforth. 

4th. Secrecv either wholly ignores the 
Lord Jesus, or fails to hold Him up as 
the absolute example for imitation. 
Either course is' fatal to salvation, and 
many o\ these lodges promise salvation, 
either by implication or by direct teach- 
ing, and thus leave souls confirmed in Sill. 
That these evils will in time become 
obvious to the Christian world, and jc 
cret societies in all their forms become 
things o\ the past, is perelVctly sure. 
Lndgerv is a craze of the hour, hut the 
sober moment will come, in which people 
will seek a more excellent \va\. 

II. II. I Human. 

( )berlin, ( )hio. 



230 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1908. 



"SQUARE DEAL FOR ALL." 

I attended a session of the Prohibition 
Convention a few days ago. The Secre- 
tary read letters from various workers 
unavoidably absent, including one from a 
Granger in sympathy with the Conven- 
tion's objects. He recommended that two 
Grangers be nominated for office, and 
said that the Grange stood for "a square 
deal for all." 

It sounded to me funny, if it was not 
Machiavelian, that a secret society, and 
oath-bound at that, should stand for "a 
square deal for all." Either the gentle- 
man was so infatuated with the order 
that he failed to see the utter selfishness 
of the obligation he had taken, or he was 
trying to fool the people at least once. 

People who take upon themselves ex- 
traordinary obligations — extrajudicial — 
yet pose as loyal citizens, either are very 
careless about the meaning of words and 
as to what constitutes citizenship, be he 
president or one of the smaller fry, or 
are intentionally out of harmony with 
lawfully constituted authorities. It is 
contrary to good sense to suppose that a 
person will surrender his conscience to a 
lodge's keeping, pledging himself to 
obedience to that lodge, and at the same 
time give "a square deal to all" citizens. 

The "square deal" given by the lodge, 
outside the obligation, materializes in 
very rare cases. When the outsider gets 
the "square deal" as against a lodge- 
member, the person giving it is a traitor 
to his obligation and is a better citizen 
than he is a lodge man. We are thank- 
ful for the few, even if they are in a false 
position ; and 'tis a pity that in the crowd 
it is so hard to separate the parrot from 
the crows. Poor Polly gets hit because 
of the company he is in, not because of 
his genus ; they get in the way. Were it 
not for the well-meaning persons drawn 
into the lodges by designing adventur- 
ers, the work of the reformer would be 
cut in two at least; the crow could not 
hold up Polly as now, and try to ward off 
criticism with Polly's reputation. It is 
mortifying that the adage, "Birds of 
feather flock together," cannot be applied 
absolutely to the crow in the case, be- 
cause the ignorant, confiding Polly has 
flocked with the crows. 



"A square deal for all," when voiced 
from behind secret obligations, had better 
be considered in the light of Washing- 
ton's farewell address. "The very idea 
of power and the right of the people to 
establish government presupposes the 
duty of every individual to obey the es- 
tablished government. 

"All obstructions to the execution of 
the laws, all combinations and associa- 
tions, under whatever plausible character, 
with the real design to direct, control, 
counteract or awe the regular delibera- 
tions and actions of the constituted au- 
thorities, are destructive of this funda- 
mental principle and of fatal tendency," 
etc. 

Of course the lodge Polly will protest 
that the above quotation does not apply 
to him, and doubtless it is an honest 
thought; neverthless the logic of Daniel 
Webster must fit the case : "And all se- 
cret associations, the members of which 
take upon themselves extraordinary ob- 
ligations to one another, and are bound 
together by secret oaths, are naturally 
sources of jealousy and just alarm to oth- 
ers ; are especially unfavorable to harm- 
ony and mutual confidence among men 
living together under popular institu- 
tions, and are dangerous to the general 
cause of civil liberty and good govern- 
ment. Under the influence of this con- 
viction it is my opinion that the future 
administration of all such oaths, and the 
formation of all such obligations, should 
be prohibited by law." 

Then and only then can we look for "a 
square deal for all." 

J. C Young. 

Degolia, Pa. 



"Any one nowadays who lets the grass 
grow under his feet, is' gradually going 



to grass. 



"A cat in a trap would be one of the 
finest exhibitions of zoology that a mouse 
ever saw." 



"Be as little of a bully in your own 
home, as you are in the street." 



"It is a thousand times better to be 
jilted before marriage, than afterward." 



December, 190S. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



231 



TESTIMONIES OF EVANGELISTS 



<%EV. R. A. TORREY 

Superintendent Bible Institute, Chicago, 
No<vj World-Wide Evangelist 

"I do not believe it possible for a man to be an intelligent Christian and an intelligent Mason 



at the same time. 





p&*^ 








VHft^t, . ; f-^ - 


I '■-'■' - 






BSk ^H 






P^ 








1 






t 



WV. GEO. C 8KEEDHAM 

The Irish 
Evangelist 

c< The mere recognition of the Bible and the mere ac- 
knowledgment of God is not enough, and especially when a 
ritual is connected with heathen ceremonies and paganistic 
initiations, does the profession of a belief in God become 
presumptuous and blasphemous." 



REV GEO. C. NEEDHAM 



DWIGHT L. mOODY 

"Give them the truth anyway, and if they would rather leave their churches than their lodges 
the sooner they get out of the churches the better. I would rather have ten members who were 
separated from the world than a thousand such members. Come out from the lodge. Better one 
■with God than a thousand without him. We must walk with God, and if only one or two go 
with us it is all right. Do not let down the standard to suit men who love their secret lodges or 
iiave some darling sin they will not give up." 

<%EV. B. CARRADINE, <D. <D. 

SM. E. Church, South; 
St. Louis, Mo., says: 



1. The method of initiation is wrong. 

2. These secret fraternities are rapidly becoming clubs and 
convivial gatherings. 

3. Secret fraternities strike at the happiness of the home. 

4. These fraternities rob Christ of his glory. 

5. The fraternity hurts us in the matter of church 
attendance. 

6. The fraternity hurts the church financially. 

7. The fraternities have captured much of our preaching 
talent. 

8. The fraternity is used by many as a substitute for the 
church. 

9. Many of these fraternities are striking at the sanctity 
of the Sabbath. 




RKV. B. CARRADINE 



GEORGE F. VENTECOST, D. D. 

"I believe that Masonry is an incalculable evil and essentially antichrist in its principles and 
influences." 



232 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1908. 



tutorial. 



The Cynosure asks tor answers to the 
question about the effect of the Masonic 
oath on knowledge of Masonry gained 
outside the lodge ; as when a Mason 
reads up a degree that he has not taken. 
The question is explained on page 1 14 of 
the August magazine. Granting the cor- 
rectness of the Entered Apprentice oath, 
does it cover what is Masonically deliv- 
ered, and that alone? Ex-President Ad- 
ams laid at the door of that degree the 
primary viciousness of Masonry, though 
he found enough of other evil in an in- 
stitution against which he hurled scath- 
ing denunciation. Will not some who 
have an opinion try to send us short 
answers to the question for early in- 
sertion ? 



CHAPLAIN REPEATS CRITICISM. 

The first Sunday in September a lodge 
bearing, with strange unfitness, the name 
"Trinity," was holding its semi-centen- 
nial. Its Chaplain, who was also the 
Episcopal rector, preached a sermon to 
the lodge, in his own pulpit. In the 
lodge-room it would not have been lawful 
for him to name the One who said, "I am 
the good Shepherd ;" now he folded the 
pack in sheep's clothing in his "Church 
of the Good Shepherd." 

He had chosen for a text Mark 14 :'j : 
"For ye have the poor always with you," 
and he explained the choice by saying : 

"The text is chosen iwith reference to the 
i'act that to-morrow is Labor Day, when it is 
bidden to remember the interests of the 
world Dgman ; and Masonry, iike all frater- 
nal orders, has for one of its leading tenets 
the care of the poor. 

"If Masonry does what is called practical 
work, and is known to have helped the sick 
or buried the dead, all men speak well of 
it ; (but if it pays attention to the social side 
of life, or has occasional spectacular cere- 
monies, some begin to say it has outlived its 
usefulness and is no longer a fraternal or- 
ganization. It has been said that it is a 
somewhat selfish or useless order, because 
the so-called beneficial side is not so pre-emi- 
nent in it as in other secret societies." 

The Masonic Chaplain thus compared 
Masonry, and noted a criticism, on so 



special an occasion as a semi-centenniaL 
He also did this more publicly because he 
was preaching in a church, and to a con- 
gregation not wholly made up from 
Masons. The comparison and criticism 
were even more forcible because made 
not only by the church's pastor but by 
the lodge's Chaplain. 



OLDEST MASON IN THE COUNTRY. 

We wonder how many "oldest Ma- 
sons" there have been, from time to time ; 
but Saturday, September 5th, Mt. Ver- 
non lodge called, in a body, on James 
Bellows McGregor, who was 107 years 
old Sunday, September 6, 1908. Besides 
being the oldest Mason, he was also near- 
ly, if not quite, the oldest white man 111 
the United States. There is one jockey 
who still drives a race horse, and is of 
about the same age as this Mason, who 
since he was a hundred years old has 
taken a first prize. Mr. McGregor, hav- 
ing been born in 1801, lived througli vir- 
tually the whole of the nineteenth cent- 
ury; and though we are not informed of 
the date of his initiation, we do know that 
his lifetime has covered more than half 
the period in which Masonry, of the pres- 
ent form, has existed. 

The grand lodge report of Illinois, for 
1873, dated the formation of the third 
degree, which is now the really essential 
one, at some time not previous to "about 
the year 1721"; and that leading author- 
ity, Dr. Mackey, claims in the Encyclo- 
paedia of Freemasonry that the third de- 
gree does not date farther back than 
about the year 1738. This does not ap- 
pear to conflict with any history that be- 
longs to the year 17 17, when the first 
grand lodge was formed. It is not nec- 
essary to imagine a third degree for that 
trade union from which speculative Ma- 
sonry drew its name. . 

From 1717 to 1801 was eighty- four 
years ; and when Mr. McGregor was 
born, men older than that were still liv- 
ing. From 1738, which Mackey makes 
the approximate date of the third degree, 
was sixty-tnree years : — less in extent than 
two-thirds of his own lifetime. He is 
therefore not only the oldest Mason in 
the country, but also a connecting link 
with that period which antedates, not 



December, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CSfNOSUUE. 



233 



only the vital degree of present Masonry, 
but also the very formation of the in- 
stitution. 



THE MOODY BIBLE INSTITUTE 

Conducts a weekly Union Bible Class 
in the Moody Church, Chicago and La- 
Salle Aves. 

One of the desires of the late D. L. 
Moody, in connection with the work in 
Chicago which bears his name, was to 
reach as large a number of people as 
possible through a Bible study class. 

The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 
conducts this Bible Conference each week 
on Saturday from 3 to 10 o'clock. The 
first hour is a Prayer Hour conducted by 
one of the pastors of the city, at which 
time requests for prayers are received 
and remembered in prayer. 

At 4 o'clock — Christian Growth Hour, 
Rev. James M. Gray, Dean of the Moody 
Bible Institute, is the speaker. 

At 5 o'clock — Christian Service Hour, 
Mr. Fitt, secretary of the Institute, con- 
ducts the hour. 

' At 6 o'clock, for those who live at a 
distance, luncheon is served. During last 
winter the average number of persons 
served each week was 418, or a total of 
10,891 during the season. 

The Missionary Library, fitted with ihe 
best books, charts and wall maps, is open 
from 4 to 8 o'clock. Copies of mission- 
ary letters from those in the field, and 
other literature is given out. 

At 6:30 o'clock — Praise Hour, con- 
ducted by Mr. C. H. Coultes, Assistant 
Superintendent of the Men. 

At 7 o'clock — Sunday School Hour, 
conducted by Mr. John H. Hunter, 
Director of the Evening Department. 

At 8 o'clock — Bible Hour, Rev. A. C. 
Dixon, D. D., Pastor of Moody Church, 
gives a popular Bible exposition of dif- 
ferent books of the Bible. 

At 9 o'clock — Prayer Hour. 

A census taken in the past shows no 
less than 150 churches represented. Peo- 
ple in attendance at this Conference often 
come from fifty to sixty miles. 



"Many who think they are going to 
land in Heaven all right will find con- 
siderable trouble at the custom-house." 



THE LEGAL VIEW OF CALLOW FRA= 
TERNITIES. 

The June number of University of 
Colorado Studies has an essay by John 
D. Fleming, dean of the law school, on 
"Some legal aspects of high-school fra- 
ternities." The study appears to have 
been thorough, and until decisions of die 
higher State courts provide actual prece- 
dents, the essay can no doubt be held 
legal authority. In fact, four decisions, 
already made, are quoted from in this es- 
say. They are from courts in Washing- 
ton, Indiana, Illinois, and Minnesota. 
They seem to make it clear that school- 
boards have lawful right to enforce-rules 
against secret societies in high schools, 
and to expel pupils who break the rules 
against them. 

Outside things brought into a school 
would seem to fall not so much in the 
way of the lawful rights of the board as 
of its legal duty. To shut out or put out 
what does harm, looks like part of 
what they are set to do. If they make 
out a plan of what pupils are to do in 
school, they seem of course to have power 
to judge what a group of young pupils 
may add to the work the board has given 
them to do in school. They cannot let a 
few young pupils harm their own work 
and that of all the rest, and do nothing 
to protect all. 

It is good to know that the dean of the 
law school of a State university makes 
the sensible view seem also legal. 
Mental, moral, and social harm is charg- 
ed to secret societies by those whose busi- 
ness it is to know high schools. If tin;. 
are held to account for the use they make 
of what they know, and for i^m^d school 
results, they ought to have lawful con- 
trol, and in the view (^\ this essay they 
do. Teachers, superintendent-, school- 
boards, and parents are not at the mere) 
of groups of children hidden in the dark 
and bent on doing mischief to themselves, 
to each other, and to others who i\^ not 
act with them in worse than foolish mis- 
deeds. 

AN ANCIENT LODGE SECRETARY. 

Men were still living who remembered 
the time when grand lodge Masonry had 
not Net come into the world, on its evil 
errand, when William 1 loskins. whose 



234 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



December, 1908. 



portrait has within a few years been 
hung in the Masonic library, became Sec- 
retary of the new Massachusetts grand 
lodge. A native of Boston, he there took 
the Blue Lodge degrees in the second 
lodge; but in 1772, just before the Rev- 
olution and only about two years after 
the Boston Massacre, he joined St. An- 
drew's lodge, and for a short time was 
its Secretary. What a sacreligious use of 
the name of Jesus' disciple was made by 
this early lodge ! Rome seems hardly 
to do worse in calling by such a name an 
image to which it bows down. 

Five years later Mr. Hoskins became 
Secretary of the grand lodge, and this 
office he continued to hold from 1777 to 
1781. At the time when he became 
Grand Secretary, grand lodge Masonry 
was sixty years old ; though this lodge in 
America was younger. He also held 
some place in the commissary depart- 
ment, ranking as an officer in the army 
01 the Revolution. 

The year before he became Grand 
Secretary, the colonies had made their 
Declaration of Independence ; in this fol- 
lowing year they adopted the present flag, 
and drew up thirteen articles of confed- 
eration for the government of the thir- 
teen States, which went into effect when 
adopted by the thirteenth State, in 1781. 
This period of progress toward union be- 
ing also that of his Masonic office, some 
Masonic orator should find a relation of 
cause and effect proving the wisdom and 
aid of Masonry. Would that his laurels 
had been otherwise won, and that his por- 
trait had been hung more openly in some 
more creditable place. But in a historic 
time, when laurels were to be won, this 
commissary officer turned to record the 
hidden doings of an English order trans- 
planted to fresh fields that it was des- 
tined to infest like an exotic weed or an 
imported thistle. 



NATURE FAKERS. 

Elk9 of the pure breed know enough 
to go into the shade, but the two-legged 
mongrels that last year herded in the 
streets at Philadelphia furnished a press 
dispatch that made sad reading, for one 
of the hottest heated terms. Hundreds of 
thousands were massed on the sidewalks 



as spectators of the parade while multi- 
tudes marched in a sun that smote like 
the Fool-killer's club. 

The Boston Elks were dressed in 
shameful caricature of the Pilgrim Fath- 
ers whom they publicly dishonored in the 
streets of Philadelphia. They were the 
more sorely punished by Old Sol, because 
they wore heavy hats with wigs. They 
also carried bean- pots, which the dis- 
patch says, they made "useful as well 
as ornamental. Some carried water in 
them, some carried lemonade, and some 
carried other things." It was no wonder 
that several of them were obliged to drop 
out of line. 

"The sun mowed down three thousand 
persons." 

"The terrific heat prostrated so many 
that the hospitals were over-crowded." 

"Every hospital and infirmary soon be- 
came swamped and all pretence of rou- 
tine was abandoned." 

"Ambulances had more than they 
could do. The police forced private 
wagons into service." 

"Ambulances, private equipages and 
wagons of all descriptions scurried about 
the city to bring the victims to the in- 
stitutions." 

"So deadly was the effect of the hu- 
midity and the terrible heat that a mes- 
sage was sent to the Elks' marshal to 
stop the parade for humanity's sake." 

"The scenes attending the carrying 
away of the victims were shocking. 
Often, as one fell others could not help 
trampling upon the limp form before it 
could be picked up." 

"Women who withstood the heat faint- 
ed at the sight and made matters worse." 

"One man's brain addled under the 
heat and he became a raving maniac. It 
took eight attendants to overpower him 
and get him to a drug store where he 
was given an ice bath." 

"Henry J. Walter, exalted ruler of 
Philadelphia Lodge, No. 2, telephoned 
from St. Joseph's Hospital: Tn the name 
of humanity get word immediately to 
Grand Exalted Ruler Melvin and have 
the parade stopped.' " 

But Melvin could not be reached for 
the crowd. 

If a herd of natural born Elks had 



December, 1908. 



CHRISTIAN CYNOSURE. 



235 



seen this herd of nature fakers, they 
would have said, "What fools these mor- 
tals be." Such a march in a noble cause 
would have evoked more than pity, it 
would have called out sympathy with 
heroism ; but this crowd, drinking liquor 
from bean pots in a dangerous sun, and 
advertising insurance of a sort in a 
ridiculous way, would have to be more 
'"'Exalted" and "Grand-exalted" to claim 
much more than the ordinary pity we 
give to those who foolishly incur injury 
and trouble. This time, nature fakers 
seemed to receive little mercy from 
Nature. 



A CUNNINGLY DEVISED SNARE. 

"Satan's masterpiece," was the descrip- 
tive name applied to Freemasonry by a 
minister of experience in the lodge. "I 
regard it," said he, "as Satan's master- 
piece, a terrible snare to men." There 
are baits of false representation and ficti- 
tious appearance to lure men into this 
snare. As soon as caught, they* are de~ 
barred from warnings other victims. The 
spear of lodge vengeance is leveled to 
enforce silence ; silence itself is the salient 
point of primary lodge obligation. Vic- 
tims al